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Posts Tagged ‘CRS’

A Proposal to Leverage FATCA to Punish Black and Grey Hat Governments.

Posted by William Byrnes on February 16, 2017


please download my proposal https://ssrn.com/abstract=2916444

Abstract: Professor William Byrnes examines whether it is prudent for taxpayers to trust the governments of the 117 countries that scored a fifty or below on Transparency International’s Irs_logocorruption index. The complete information system invoked by the Foreign Account Tax Compliance Act (FATCA) encourages, even prolongs, the bad behavior of black hat governments by providing fuel (financial information) to feed the fire of corruption and suppression of rivals. Professor Byrnes recommends that the United States leverage a “carrot-stick” policy tool to incentivize bad actors to adopt best tax administration practices.  Article download at https://ssrn.com/abstract=2916444

Keywords: FATCA, Common Reporting Standards, OECD, Exchange of Information, Taxpayer Rights, IGA, corruption

Professor William Byrnes is the primary author of Lexis’ Guide to FATCA and Common Reporting Standard Compliance – 2017.  He designed then wrote the initial 2012 edition and has grown it to the #1 FATCA resource for advisors and institutions.  Now in its fifth edition for 2017!

Over 1,800 pages of analysis of the FATCA and CRS compliance challenges,  79 chapters by FATCA and CRS contributing experts from over 50 countries. Besides in-depth, practical analysis, the 2017 edition includes examples, charts, timelines, links to source documents, and compliance analysis pursuant to the IGA, CRS agreement, and local regulations for many financial centers.   This fifth edition will provide the financial enterprise’s FATCA and CRS compliance officer the tools for developing and maintaining a best practices compliance strategy.  No filler of forms and regs – it’s all beef !  See Lexis’ order site and request a copy of the forthcoming 2017 edition – http://www.lexisnexis.com/store/catalog/booktemplate/productdetail.jsp?pageName=relatedProducts&prodId=prod19190327

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OECD Common Reporting Self Certification Tax Forms Now Available

Posted by William Byrnes on February 10, 2016


hat tip: Prof. Haydon Perryman: OECD Self-certification forms

The Business and Industry Advisory Committee to the OECD (BIAC) has drafted the following self-certification forms –  

Financial institutions should consult their advisers to ensure their CRS-related operations, including the self-certification forms collected from accountholders, comply with all applicable national laws. 

Guide to FATCA Compliance (New 2016 Edition includes) over 1,500 pages of analysis of the FATCA and CRS compliance challenges,  73 chapters by FATCA and CRS contributingOECDexperts from over 30 countries.  Besides in-depth, practical analysis, the 2016 edition includes examples, charts, time lines, links to source documents, and compliance analysis pursuant to the IGA and local regulations for many U.S. trading partners and financial centers.   The Lexis Guide to FATCA Compliance, designed from interviews with over 100 financial institutions and professional firms, is a primary reference source for financial institutions and service providers, advisors and government departments.  The 19 newest chapters include by example an in-depth analysis of designing a FATCA internal policy that is compliant with the initial two-year soft enforcement initiative, designing an equivalent form to the W-8, reporting accounts, reporting payments, operational specificity of the mechanisms of information capture, management and exchange by firms and between countries, insights as to the application of FATCA, CRS, and the IGAs within BRIC, SEA and European country chapters.

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OECD Releases 3 New Reports to Combat Offshore Tax Evasion

Posted by William Byrnes on August 8, 2015


The OECD today releases three new reports to help jurisdictions and financial institutionsOECDimplement the global Standard for automatic exchange of financial account information.

  • Common Reporting Standard Implementation Handbook (the CRS Handbook): this first edition provides practical guidance to assist government officials and financial institutions in the implementation of the Standard. It sets out the necessary steps for implementation and will help financial institutions and governments implement the Standard more efficiently by promoting the consistent use of optional provisions, identifying areas for alignment with FATCA and addressing the operational and transitional challenges resulting from the staggered implementation of the Standard. It also contains answers to frequently asked questions (FAQs) received from business and governments, with a view to furthering the effective implementation of the Standard. The Handbook is intended to be a “living” document and will be updated on a regular basis.

  • Offshore Voluntary Disclosure Programmes: this second edition contains a wealth of practical experience from 47 countries in relation to their voluntary disclosure programmes. The guidance on the design and implementation of such programmes has been updated, particularly taking into account the views of private client advisers. The limited time left until the automatic exchange of information under the Standard becomes a reality will in many instances be the last window of opportunity for non-compliant taxpayers to voluntarily disclose. This is therefore a crucial moment to update the publication and reflects OECD policy of encouraging countries to examine voluntary compliance strategies that enable non-compliant taxpayers to come forward.

The Standard calls on jurisdictions to obtain information from their financial institutions and automatically exchange that information with other jurisdictions on an annual basis. Over 90 jurisdictions have committed to implement the Standard, with the first exchanges starting in 2017/2018, subject to the completion of necessary legislative procedures.

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Global Forum releases new compliance ratings on tax transparency

Posted by William Byrnes on August 6, 2015


The Global Forum on Transparency and Exchange of Information for Tax Purposes published new peer review reports today for 12 countries or jurisdictions, moving further OECDahead with its goal to implement global standards on transparency and exchange of information for tax purposes.

Phase 1 reports on AlbaniaBurkina FasoCameroonDominican Republic,LesothoPakistan and Uganda assessed their legal and regulatory frameworks for transparency and exchange of information on request. These countries were assessed to have legal frameworks in place to enable them to move to the next stage of the review process, which will assess exchange of information practices.

The Global Forum also reviewed exchange of information practices through Phase 2 peer review reports in Lithuania and Sint Maarten. Both were given a rating for compliance with the individual elements of the international standard and an overall rating with Lithuania receiving an overall rating of “Compliant” and Sint Maarten an overall rating of “Partially Compliant.”

Jurisdictions continue to request supplementary reviews that assess steps taken to address recommendations of the Global Forum to address gaps in their legal frameworks and exchange of information practices identified in previous reviews. This included the Marshall Islands, which had been blocked from moving to Phase 2 of its review process due to significant gaps in its legal framework. A supplementary review concluded that key changes to its legislation now enable the Marshall Islands to move to Phase 2.

Austria, which was rated “Partially Compliant” in July 2013, has since implemented a number of recommendations by the Global Forum, leading to an upgrade of its overall rating to “Largely Compliant” in its supplementary report. The supplementary report of the British Virgin Islands, which assesses progress made since its Phase 2 report in July 2013 also concluded that based on significant improvements having been made, its overall rating be upgraded from “Non-Compliant” to “Largely Compliant.”

The Global Forum is the world’s largest international tax group, with 127 members on an equal footing. The Forum has now completed 198 peer reviews and assignedcompliance ratings to 80 jurisdictions that have undergone Phase 2 reviews. Of these, 21 jurisdictions are rated “Compliant”, 46 are rated “Largely Compliant”, 10 are rated “Partially Compliant” and 3 jurisdictions are “Non-Compliant.” A further 11 jurisdictions are blocked from moving to a Phase 2 review due to insufficiencies in their legal and regulatory framework.

The Global Forum continues to ensure that the benefits of participation in the new tax transparent and cooperative environment are available to all. It has conducted a number of training seminars to help jurisdictions prepare for peer reviews, sensitize tax auditors in the use of the exchange of information infrastructure and equip governments to implement automatic exchange of information. Around 200 tax experts participated in seminars in Colombia, Cameroon, Ghana and Kenya. The Global Forum will also support a new pilot project on Automatic Exchange of Information announced jointly by Ghana and the UK on the sidelines of the 3rd Financing for Development Conference in Addis Ababa.

Global Forum members will meet at their annual plenary meeting on 29-30 October 2015 in Bridgetown, Barbados.

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UK Amnesty Not Leading to Disclosure of Tax Evasion in Channels. Is It “Much To Do About Nothing” ?

Posted by William Byrnes on July 22, 2015


In 2011, HMRC forecast that it would receive “billions” from the Swiss Disclosure HM_Treasury_logo.svgFacility.  In 2012, HMRC stated that this number would be 5 billion sterling, and another 3 billion sterling from the LDF.  This implies that a couple hundred thousand United Kingdom tax residents are non tax compliant by not disclosing income and income-producing assets overseas, in offshore countries.  As of that report of data up to 2012, 50,000 taxpayers had come forward through all offshore disclosure facilities, generating one billion in tax, interest, and tax penalties, thus on average 20,000 sterling per disclosure.

My tables and figures are available at International Financial Law Prof Blog.

The offshore noncompliance problem in the context of all non-tax compliance, and all taxpayers, requires first asking how many individual taxpayers file in the UK? see International Financial Law Prof Blog.

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Haydon Perryman & William Byrnes’ June FATCA GIIN Update

Posted by William Byrnes on July 1, 2015


The FFI GIIN List Update (Lists from June 1, 2014 through June 1, 2015)

On 1 June 2015 the IRS published its thirteenth FATCA GIIN list of “approved FFIs” (a list of theFATCA_rollfinancial firms that have registered on the IRS FATCA portal).

Total approved FFIs reached 165,461, and increase of only 2,851 during the month of May.  This FATCA registration trend since January has been described as lethargic, with April’s increase just 2,600 additional firms joining, 3,734 additional during March, and 2,479 in February.  But when compared to what was forecast by the IRS, by industry, and by the UK, it’s a troubling low figure.

In its FATCA FAQs, the IRS suggested a 500,000 potential FFI registration figure.  Many industry stakeholders suggested that 800,000 – 900,000 firms fall under the expansive definition of financial institution.

Given the broad definition of a financial institution that must register for a GIIN, the UK HMRC estimated that, even with its IGA and its accompanying local regulations, 75,000 UK entities probably are impacted.  Yet, only the UK GIIN population is only 23,256.

If the UK HMRC is correct that 75,000 entities are impacted in the UK, then extrapolated among other large and sophisticated financial service economies like Japan, China, India, and Germany, the IRS estimate of 500,000 may be low.

90 countries and dependencies have entered into a FATCA IGA with the U.S. based on Model 1A (reciprocal), or are awaiting local ratification, accounting for 100,190 of the registrations.  A further eight countries signed a Model 1B (non-reciprocal), accounting for a further 39,564 GIINs.  A final 14 countries signed a Model 2 version IGA, adding 18,458 FFI registrations covered by an IGA.  Thus in total, 158,212, representing 96% of FFI registrations, are from the 112 IGA states and their dependencies.

The 131 countries and dependencies without an IGA have only registered 6,295 FFIs to date, a surprising low number given that the initial implementation of the 30% withholding for non-compliance with FATCA began 1 July 2014.

The UK and its ten dependencies and overseas territories comprised 74,694 of the GIINs, representing 45% of the total, or without the UK included, 49,898 for 30.6%.  The 34 OECD members have produced 79,057 GIIN registrations.

Cayman remains the FFI registration global leader, with 30,868, throughout the entire FATCA registration process.  Ironic that the EU Commission just black listed it last week.

The major financial industries of the four BRIC countries have only led to 8,254 FFI registrations, which is seen as a worrying point for FATCA acceptance among non-OECD states.  BRIC registrations are now just dripping in, up from 8,186 in May, 8,060 in April and 7,962 in March.

OECD Common Reporting Standard signatories for the a multilateral competent authority agreement to automatically exchange information has reached 61.  But a notable holdout of a signatory that has not yet actually ratified the agreement is the U.S.  88 countries and dependencies are signatories to the Multilateral Convention on Mutual Administrative Assistance in Tax Matters, the latest being Mauritius which signed June 23.

FATCA IGA Scenarios GIINs Jurisdictions
Model 1A IGA  100,190  90
Model 1B IGA  39,564  8
Model 2 IGA  18,458  14
No IGA  6,295  131
US  886  1
US Territories  68  6
Total  165,461  250

Want to read more GIIN analysis and statistics?  See the International Financial Law Professor blog

I am beginning my new faculty position with Texas A&M University School of Law in a week.  With the resources of Texas A&M Law, my research colleague Haydon Perryman (who is now with UBS Investment Bank where he is responsible for global regulatory reporting of FATCA and the CRS) and I will be able to expand our FATCA and CRS research capacity.  Any readers that want to assist in such research, please contact us at Haydon Perryman or William Byrnes.  Please download my FATCA SSRN article here.

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Heads of Tax Administration agree global tax actions

Posted by William Byrnes on October 27, 2014


OCDE_10cm_4c

The OECD/G20 Base Erosion and Profit Shifting (BEPS) Project and the move to automatic exchange of financial account information took centre stage when Heads of Tax Administration met on 23-24 October in Dublin, Ireland.  The FTA is the leading international body concerned with tax administration, bringing together the heads of tax administrations from the OECD, members of the G20 and large emerging economies.

More than forty delegations participated in the Ninth Meeting of the OECD Forum on Tax Administration (FTA) and agreed that ever greater co-operation will be necessary to implement the results of the BEPS project and automatic exchange of information.

Specifically they agreed:

  • A strategy for systematic and enhanced co-operation between tax administrations;
  • To invest the resources needed to implement the new standard on automatic exchange of information; and
  • To improve the practical operation of the mutual agreement process.

The communiqué released at the close of the meeting contains more details and contains links to the following publications that have just been released by the FTA:

Excerpted from the communiqué:  To support the implementation of these global initiatives, while improving service levels and operational efficiency, we as Commissioners with responsibility for tax administration and compliance management must work ever more closely together, share our knowledge, co-ordinate our actions and deal with tax administration aspects that may result from the BEPS work. Recognising the support of G20 Finance Ministers for further “co-ordination and collaboration by tax administrations on compliance activities on entities and individuals involved in cross border tax arrangements” we agreed the following actions:

• We are taking a significant step forward in global tax co-operation. We have agreed a strategy for systematic and enhanced co-operation between our tax administrations, based on existing legal instruments, that will allow us to quickly understand and deal with global tax risks whenever and wherever they arise. Along with the strategy, we have created a new international platform called the JITSIC1 Network to focus specifically on cross border tax avoidance, which is open to all FTA members on a voluntary basis. This new network integrates the existing cooperation amongst some of us into the larger FTA framework.

• We will invest the resources necessary to implement the new standard on automatic exchange of information and use the information to counter tax evasion wherever it arises, while protecting taxpayer confidentiality and ensuring the proper use of the information. We will ensure that common, secure and effective transmission systems are in place.

• We will improve the practical operation of the Mutual Agreement Procedure (MAP) so that issues of double taxation are addressed more quickly and efficiently in order to meet the needs of both governments and taxpayers and so assure the critical role of those procedures in the global tax environment. We have advanced work in this area which will be integrated with the result from the related 2015 BEPS action item. We will encourage competent authorities of all member countries to actively participate in the relevant activities (www.oecd.org/site/ctpfta/map-strategic-plan.pdf).

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OECD releases Standard for Automatic Exchange of Financial Account Information in Tax Matters

Posted by William Byrnes on July 21, 2014



OCDE_10cm_4c

 

The OECD today released the full version of a new global standard for the exchange of information between jurisdictions.

I have posted Notes on the Common Reporting Standard for Automatic Information Exchange on my new International Financial Professor Law Blog at

http://lawprofessors.typepad.com/intfinlaw/2014/07/the-oecd-today-released-the-full-version-of-a-new-global-standard-for-the-exchange-of-information-between-jurisdictions.html

CRS Due Diligence Standards similar but not identical to FATCA

The CRS contains a reporting and a due diligence standard that underpins the automatic exchange of information, very similar to FATCA.

Due diligence distinguishes between pre-existing accounts and new accounts, individual accounts and entity accounts.

Individual Accounts

Pre-existing accounts do not have a de minimis amount but are divided between low value and high value accounts.

Low Value

Low value accounts have a permanent residency based test based on documentation or, failing that, based upon indicia.  If indicia are found, then either the account holder must provide self-certification or the account must be reported to all jurisdictions to which the indicia attach.

High Value

High value accounts are defined as having an aggregate balance or value of $1 million US dollars by December 31 of a calendar year. High value accounts require a paper based search as well as the test of actual knowledge of the relationship manager.

New Accounts

All new individual accounts (no de minimis) require self-certification, with confirmation of its reasonableness, which can be performed at the time of account onboarding.

Entity Accounts

Preexisting entity accounts

Preexisting entity accounts firstly need to determine if the entity is a reportable person, generally using available AML/KYC information, and if such information is not available, then a self certification will be required from the entity.

However, a preexisting entity account de minimis size of US$250,000 is available at the option of the jurisdiction adopting the CRS.

Passive entity

If the entity is a passive entity then the residency of the controlling members of the entity must be determined.  Passive entity status may be determined by self-certification unless the financial institution has contra-indication information, or information is otherwise publicly available to refute the self-certification.  Controlling members of the entity may be determined based upon the AML/KYC information available.  Control must be interpreted in a manner consistent with the FATF standard.

New entity accounts

For new accounts, the de minimis option is not available because self-certification is easily obtainable at account opening.

See full comments at http://lawprofessors.typepad.com/intfinlaw/2014/07/the-oecd-today-released-the-full-version-of-a-new-global-standard-for-the-exchange-of-information-between-jurisdictions.html

free Lexis FATCA Compliance chapter download here —> http://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=2457671   Number of Pages in PDF File: 58

Over 600 pages of in-depth analysis of the practical compliance aspects of financial service business providing for exchange of information of information about foreign residents with their national competent authority or with the IRS (FATCA).

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66th country signs OECD Convention on Tax Information Exchange

Posted by William Byrnes on July 4, 2014


free chapter download here —> http://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=2457671   Number of Pages in PDF File: 58

The OECD announced yesterday that Gabon became the 66th country to sign the Multilateral Convention on Mutual Administrative Assistance in Tax Matters. Gabon is the seventh African country to sign the Convention since it was opened for signature to all countries in June 2011.  (previous article on tax information exchange)

“Already a member of the Global Forum on Transparency and Exchange of Information for Tax Purposes since October 2012, Gabon’s commitment today plays an important role for regional co-operation in tax matters and demonstrates effective action towards greater exchange of information”, said Pascal Saint-Amans. “We hope it will act as an encouragement to other African and developing countries to also join this important area of international co-operation in the fight for a fairer and more transparent international tax system”.

The Convention provides for all forms of mutual assistance: exchange on request, spontaneous exchange, tax examinations abroad, simultaneous tax examinations and assistance in tax collection , while protecting taxpayers’ rights. It also provides the option to undertake automatic exchange, requiring an agreement between the Parties interested in adopting this form of assistance.

Automatic Exchange of Information for Tax Purposes

47 countries and major financial centers on May 6, 2014 committed to automatic exchange of information between their jurisdictions, announced the OECD.  All 34 OECD member countries, as well as Argentina, Brazil, China, Colombia, Costa Rica, India, Indonesia, Latvia, Lithuania, Malaysia, Saudi Arabia, Singapore and South Africa  endorsed the Declaration on Automatic Exchange of Information in Tax Matters that was released at the May 6-7, 2014 Meeting of the OECD at a Ministerial Level.

The Declaration commits countries to implement a new single global standard on automatic exchange of information (“CRS” or “GATCA”).  The OECD stated that it will deliver a detailed Commentary on the new standard, as well as technical solutions to implement the actual information exchanges, during a meeting of G20 finance ministers in September 2014.

Common Reporting and Due Diligence Standards (“CRS”)

February 13 the OECD released the Standard for Automatic Exchange of Financial Account Information Common Reporting Standard.  The Draft Commentaries for the CRS, developed by the Working Party No. 10 on Exchange of Information and Tax Compliance, and discussed at its May 26-28, 2014 meeting, are expected to be released very shortly, in July.

The CRS calls on jurisdictions to obtain information from their financial institutions and automatically exchange that information with other jurisdictions on an annual basis. It sets out the financial account information to be exchanged, the financial institutions that need to report, the different types of accounts and taxpayers covered, as well as common due diligence procedures to be followed by financial institutions. Part I of the report gives an overview of the standard. Part II contains the text of the Model Competent Authority Agreement (CAA) and the Common Reporting and Due Diligence Standards (CRS) that together make up the standard.

What are the main differences between the CRS (“GATCA”) and FATCA?

The CRS is also informally called “GATCA”, referring to the “globalization” of FATCA.

The CRS consists of a fully reciprocal automatic exchange system from which US specificities have been removed. For instance, it is based on residence and unlike FATCA does not refer to citizenship. Terms, concepts and approaches have been standardized allowing countries to use the system without having to negotiate individual Annexes.

Unlike FATCA the CRS does not provide for thresholds for pre-existing individual accounts, but it includes a residence address test building on the EU savings directive. The CRS also provides for a simplified indicia search for such accounts. Finally, it has special rules dealing with certain investment entities where they are based in jurisdictions that do not participate in the automatic exchange under the standard.

Single Global Standard for Automatic Exchange (“GATCA”)

Under GATCA jurisdictions obtain information from their financial institutions and automatically exchange that information with other jurisdictions on an annual basis. Part I of this report gives an overview of the standard. Part II contains the text of the Model Competent Authority Agreement (CAA) and the Common Reporting and Due Diligence Standards (CRS) that together make up the standard.

The Report sets out the financial account information to be exchanged, the financial institutions that need to report, the different types of accounts and taxpayers covered, as well as common due diligence procedures to be followed by financial institutions.

To prevent taxpayers from circumventing the CRS it is specifically designed with a broad scope across three dimensions:

  1. The financial information to be reported with respect to reportable accounts includes all types of investment income (including interest, dividends, income from certain insurance contracts and other similar types of income) but also account balances and sales proceeds from financial assets.
  2. The financial institutions that are required to report under the CRS do not only include banks and custodians but also other financial institutions such as brokers, certain collective investment vehicles and certain insurance companies.
  3. Reportable accounts include accounts held by individuals and entities (which includes trusts and foundations), and the standard includes a requirement to look through passive entities to report on the individuals that ultimately control these entities.

The CRS also describes the due diligence procedures that must be followed by financial institutions to identify reportable accounts.

If CRS and IGAs are Universally Adopted, Then Why is the Multilateral Convention on Mutual Administrative Assistance in Tax Matters Necessary?

Both the CRS model, which is currently being developed by the OECD with G20 countries, and the IGAs are based on the automatic exchange of information from the tax administration of one country to the tax administration of the residence country.  As with other forms of exchange of information, a legal basis is needed to carry out automatic exchange. While bilateral treaties such as those based on Article 26 of the OECD Model Tax Convention would permit such exchanges, it may be more efficient to implement a single global standard through a multilateral instrument.  See OECD Information Brief

Global Forum Peer Reviews and Monitoring Of Automatic Exchange

G20 governments have mandated the OECD-hosted Global Forum on Transparency and Exchange of Information for Tax Purposes to monitor and review implementation of the standard.  More than 60 countries and jurisdictions of the 121 Global Forum members have now committed to early adoption of the standard, and additional members are expected to join this group in the coming months. See the link for Country Peer Reviews and the Global Forum list of ratings chart.

book coverPractical Compliance Aspects of FATCA and GATCA

Over 600 pages of in-depth analysis of the practical compliance aspects of financial service business providing for exchange of information of information about foreign residents with their national competent authority or with the IRS (FATCA), see Lexis Guide to FATCA Compliance, 2nd Edition just published!

34 chapters by 50 experts grouped in three parts: compliance program (Chapters 1–4), analysis of FATCA regulations (Chapters 5–16) and analysis of Intergovernmental Agreements (IGAs) and local law compliance requirements (Chapters 17–34), including  information exchange protocols and systems.

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47 Countries Endorse OECD’s GATCA / CRS

Posted by William Byrnes on May 10, 2014


47 countries and major financial centers on May 6, 2014 committed to automatic exchange of information between their jurisdictions, announced the OECD.  All 34 OECD member countries, as well as Argentina, Brazil, China, Colombia, Costa Rica, India, Indonesia, Latvia, Lithuania, Malaysia, Saudi Arabia, Singapore and South Africa  endorsed the Declaration on Automatic Exchange of Information in Tax Matters that was released at the May 6-7, 2014 Meeting of the OECD at a Ministerial Level.

The Declaration commits countries to implement a new single global standard on automatic exchange of information (“CRS” or “GATCA”).  The OECD stated that it will deliver a detailed Commentary on the new standard, as well as technical solutions to implement the actual information exchanges, during a meeting of G20 finance ministers in September 2014.  The Declaration contains the following statements:

“2. CONFIRM that automatic exchange of financial account information will further these objectives particularly if the new single global standard, including full transparency on ownership interests, is implemented among all financial centres;

3. ACKNOWLEDGE that information exchanged on the basis of the new single global standard is subject to appropriate safeguards including certain confidentiality requirements and the requirement that information may be used only for the purposes foreseen by the legal instrument pursuant to which it is exchanged;

4. ARE DETERMINED to implement the new single global standard swiftly, on a reciprocal basis. We will translate the standard into domestic law, including to ensure that information on beneficial ownership of legal persons and arrangements is effectively collected and exchanged in accordance with the standard;”

Global Forum Peer Reviews and Monitoring

G20 governments have mandated the OECD-hosted Global Forum on Transparency and Exchange of Information for Tax Purposes to monitor and review implementation of the standard.  More than 60 countries and jurisdictions of the 121 Global Forum membershave now committed to early adoption of the standard, and additional members are expected to join this group in the coming months. See the link for Country Peer Reviews and the Global Forum list of ratings chart.

Common Reporting and Due Diligence Standards (“CRS”)

February 13 the OECD released the Standard for Automatic Exchange of Financial Account Information Common Reporting Standard.

The CRS calls on jurisdictions to obtain information from their financial institutions and automatically exchange that information with other jurisdictions on an annual basis. It sets out the financial account information to be exchanged, the financial institutions that need to report, the different types of accounts and taxpayers covered, as well as common due diligence procedures to be followed by financial institutions. Part I of the report gives an overview of the standard. Part II contains the text of the Model Competent Authority Agreement (CAA) and the Common Reporting and Due Diligence Standards (CRS) that together make up the standard.

Presenting the new standard back in February 2014, OECD Secretary-General Angel Gurría said: “This is a real game changer. Globalisation of the world’s financial system has made it increasingly simple for people to make, hold and manage investments outside their country of residence. This new standard on automatic exchange of information will ramp up international tax co-operation, putting governments back on a more even footing as they seek to protect the integrity of their tax systems and fight tax evasion.”

What are the main differences between the CRS (“GATCA”) and FATCA?

The CRS is also informally called “GATCA”, referring to the “globalization” of FATCA.

The CRS consists of a fully reciprocal automatic exchange system from which US specificities have been removed. For instance, it is based on residence and unlike FATCA does not refer to citizenship. Terms, concepts and approaches have been standardized allowing countries to use the system without having to negotiate individual Annexes.

Unlike FATCA the CRS does not provide for thresholds for pre-existing individual accounts, but it includes a residence address test building on the EU savings directive. The CRS also provides for a simplified indicia search for such accounts. Finally, it has special rules dealing with certain investment entities where they are based in jurisdictions that do not participate in the automatic exchange under the standard.

Single Global Standard for Automatic Exchange (“GATCA”)

Under GATCA jurisdictions obtain information from their financial institutions and automatically exchange that information with other jurisdictions on an annual basis. Part I of this report gives an overview of the standard. Part II contains the text of the Model Competent Authority Agreement (CAA) and the Common Reporting and Due Diligence Standards (CRS) that together make up the standard.

The Report sets out the financial account information to be exchanged, the financial institutions that need to report, the different types of accounts and taxpayers covered, as well as common due diligence procedures to be followed by financial institutions.

To prevent taxpayers from circumventing the CRS it is specifically designed with a broad scope across three dimensions:

  1. The financial information to be reported with respect to reportable accounts includes all types of investment income (including interest, dividends, income from certain insurance contracts and other similar types of income) but also account balances and sales proceeds from financial assets.
  2. The financial institutions that are required to report under the CRS do not only include banks and custodians but also other financial institutions such as brokers, certain collective investment vehicles and certain insurance companies.
  3. Reportable accounts include accounts held by individuals and entities (which includes trusts and foundations), and the standard includes a requirement to look through passive entities to report on the individuals that ultimately control these entities.

The CRS also describes the due diligence procedures that must be followed by financial institutions to identify reportable accounts.

book coverLexis Guide to FATCA Compliance – 2015 Edition 

1,200 pages of analysis of the compliance challenges, over 54 chapters by 70 FATCA contributing experts from over 30 countries.  Besides in-depth, practical analysis, the 2015 edition includes examples, charts, time lines, links to source documents, and compliance analysis pursuant to the IGA and local regulations for many U.S. trading partners and financial centers.   The Lexis Guide to FATCA Compliance, designed from interviews with over 100 financial institutions and professional firms, is a primary reference source for financial institutions and service providers, advisors and government departments.  No filler of forms and regs – it’s all beef !  See Lexis’ order site and request a copy of the forthcoming 2015 edition – http://www.lexisnexis.com/store/catalog/booktemplate/productdetail.jsp?pageName=relatedProducts&prodId=prod19190327

A free download of the first of the 34 chapters is available at http://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=2457671

<— Subscribe by email on the left menu to the FATCA Updates on this blog:  https://profwilliambyrnes.com/category/fatca/

If you are interested in discussing the Master or Doctoral degree in the areas of international taxation or anti money laundering compliance, please contact me profbyrnes@gmail.com to Google Hangout or Skype that I may take you on an “online tour”

  • Chapter 1 Background and Current Status of FATCA
  • Chapter 1A The International Financial System and FATCA
  • Chapter 2 Practical Considerations for Developing a FATCA Compliance Program
  • Chapter 2A FATCA Internal Policy
  • Chapter 3 FATCA Compliance and Integration of Information Technology
  • Chapter 4 Financial Institution Account Remediation
  • Chapter 4A FATCA Customer Outreach
  • Chapter 5 FBAR and Form 8938 Reporting and List of International Taxpayer IRS Forms
  • Chapter 6 Determining U.S. Ownership of Foreign Entities
  • Chapter 7 Foreign Financial Institutions
  • Chapter 7A Account reporting under FATCA
  • Chapter 8 Non-Financial Foreign Entities
  • Chapter 9 FATCA and the Offshore Trust Industry
  • Chapter 10 FATCA and the Insurance Industry
  • Chapter 11 Withholding and Qualified Intermediary
  • Chapter 12 FATCA Withholding Compliance
  • Chapter 13 “Withholdable” Payments
  • Chapter 13A Reporting Payments
  • Chapter 14 Determining and Documenting the Payee
  • Chapter 14A W8 Equivalents
  • Chapter 15 Framework of Intergovernmental Agreements
  • Chapter 16 Analysis of Current Intergovernmental Agreements
  • Chapter 17 European Union Cross Border Information Reporting
  • Chapter 18 The OECD Role in Exchange of Information: The Trace Project, FATCA, and Beyond
  • Chapter 19 Germany
  • Chapter 20 Ireland
  • Chapter 21 Japan
  • Chapter 22 Mexico
  • Chapter 23 Switzerland
  • Chapter 24 United Kingdom
  • Chapter 25 Brazil
  • Chapter 26 British Virgin Islands
  • Chapter 27 Canada
  • Chapter 28 Spain
  • Chapter 29 China
  • Chapter 30 Netherlands
  • Chapter 31 Luxembourg
  • Chapter 32 Russia
  • Chapter 33 Turkey
  • Chapter 34 India
  • Chapter 35 Argentina
  • Chapter 36 Aruba
  • Chapter 37 Australia
  • Chapter 38 Bermuda
  • Chapter 39 Colombia
  • Chapter 40 Cyprus
  • Chapter 41 Hong Kong
  • Chapter 42 Macau
  • Chapter 43 Portugal
  • Chapter 44 South Africa
  • Chapter 45 France
  • Chapter 46 Gibraltar
  • Chapter 47 Guernsey
  • Chapter 48 Italy


If you are interested in discussing the Master or Doctoral degree in the areas of financial services or international taxation, please contact me: profbyrnes@gmail.com to Google Hangout or Skype that I may take you on an “online tour” 

Posted in FATCA, OECD, Reporting | Tagged: , , , | 1 Comment »

 
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