William Byrnes' Tax, Wealth, and Risk Intelligence

William Byrnes (Texas A&M) tax & compliance articles

Posts Tagged ‘Retirement planning’

Byrnes & Bloink’s TaxFacts Intelligence (September 17, 2020)

Posted by William Byrnes on September 17, 2020


Texas A&M University School of Law’s online wealth management, international tax risk management, and general risk management graduate curricula for industry professionals has attracted over 160 enrolled for fall semester. Apply now for courses that begin January 11. 

Texas A&M, annual budget of $6.3 billion (FY2020), is the largest U.S. public university, one of only 60 accredited U.S. universities of the American Association of Universities (R1: Doctoral Universities – Highest Research Activity) and one of only 17 U.S. universities that hold the triple U.S. federal grant of Land, Sea, and Space!

 

Prof. William H. Byrnes
        Robert Bloink, J.D., LL.M.

The big news this week: COVID hardship distributions for qualified plans was one of the headline features of the CARES Act, but Notice 2020-50 was recently released and deals with COVID distributions from nonqualified plans as well. Given the wide variety of nonqualified plans this could present some significant planning opportunities. We also see updates on excess parachute payments and proposed regs that would allow HRAs to reimburse expenses for concierge care, which is an increasingly popular option for many individuals and families..

IRS Guidance Sheds Light on Nonqualified Plan Election Rules

IRS Notice 2020-50 provided substantial guidance on the treatment of coronavirus-related distributions for both qualified and nonqualified plan purposes. With respect to Section 409A and nonqualified plans, the IRS confirmed that such a distribution would be treated as a hardship distribution. This allows nonqualified deferred compensation plans to amend their terms to allow either (1) automatic suspension of the individual’s deferral elections throughout 2020 or (2) the right for qualified individuals to elect to suspend their deferral elections during 2020. For more information on hardship and nonqualified deferred compensation plans, visit Tax Facts Online. Read More

Proposed IRS Regs Clarify Definition of “Excess Parachute Payment” for Tax-Exempt Tax Rules

Tax-exempt entities are subject to a 21 percent tax on excess compensation and excess parachute payments under the 2017 tax reform legislation. The IRS has proposed regulations clarifying that certain payments are exempt from the definition. However, amounts paid by the organization itself, a predecessor or related organization may also be included in the calculation. For more information on the new rules, visit Tax Facts Online. Read More

IRS Proposed Regs Allow HRA Reimbursement for Concierge Care

The IRS proposed regulations on direct primary care arrangements impact the medical expense deduction, availability of HRA reimbursements and eligibility for HSA participation. Under the regulations, a direct primary care arrangement could be used for medical care or medical insurance and could also be reimbursed from an HRA. However, individuals covered by these arrangements would lose eligibility to contribute to an HSA under most circumstances. For more information on the types of expenses that HRAs can cover, visit Tax Facts Online. Read More

Byrnes & Bloink’s Tax Facts Offers a Complete Web, App-Based, and Print Experience

Reducing complicated tax questions to understandable answers that can be immediately put into real-life practice, Tax Facts works when and where you need it….on your desktop, at home on your laptop, and on the go through your tablet or smartphone.

  • all Tax Facts books
  • Tax Facts Intelligence weekly newsletters
  • weekly strategy articles for client advisory
  • weekly transcribed debate discussion for client soft-skill discussion
  • among other weekly client advisory critical updates

Questions? Contact customer service: TaxFactsHelp@alm.com800-543-0874

Posted in Retirement Planning, Wealth Management | Tagged: , , , | Leave a Comment »

Byrnes & Bloink’s TaxFacts Intelligence Special Edition for July 15, 2020 – Tax Filing and Tax Payments Due Today

Posted by William Byrnes on July 15, 2020


Texas A&M University School of Law has launched its online international tax risk management graduate curricula for industry professionals.  Apply now for courses that begin August 23: International Tax Risk Management, Data, and Analytics; International Tax & Tax Treaties (complete list here

Texas A&M University is a public university, ranked in the top 20 universities by the Wall Street Journal / Times Higher Education university rankings, and is ranked 1st among public universities for its superior education at an affordable cost (Fiske, 2018) and ranked 1st of Texas public universities for best value (Money, 2018).

 

 

Prof. William H. Byrnes
        Robert Bloink, J.D., LL.M.

 

Back in April we sent out a special newsletter detailing all of the COVID-related tax changes that we had made to Tax Facts Online content up to that point. Not surprisingly, we have continued to see significant changes since then. This week we’re back with a second special newsletter detailing the changes that we have seen since April. Below are all of the changes made that are related to the Families First Coronavirus Response Act, the CARES Act (including the PPP program), and various regulations from the IRS and DOL. As always, log into Tax Facts Online for the full text of these updates and many others.

Families First Coronavirus Response Act: FFCRA Exemption for Very Small Business Clients

Generally, business owners with fewer than 50 employees can claim an exemption from the paid sick leave and expanded FMLA law if they can show that payment would jeopardize their business as a going concern. DOL FAQ have provided new details, which substantially narrow the availability of the exemption. To qualify, the employee must be taking leave to care for children because of COVID-19 and must satisfy one of three possible criteria to demonstrate that paid leave would jeopardize the business. The three conditions are: (1) providing leave would result in the small business expenses and financial obligations exceeding available business revenues, causing the business to stop operating at minimal capacity, (2) absence of the employee requesting leave would result in a substantial risk to the financial health or operational capabilities of the small business because of their specialized skills, knowledge of the business, or responsibilities; or (3) there are not sufficient workers who are able, willing, and qualified, and who will be available at the time and place needed, to perform the labor or services provided by the employee requesting paid leave, and these labor or services are needed for the small business to operate at a minimal capacity. For more information on the FFCRA paid leave requirements, visit Tax Facts Online. Read More

Families First Coronavirus Response Act: DOL FAQ Clarify Concurrent Use of FFCRA Leave

The FFCRA implemented a new paid sick leave law and expanded FMLA leave options for employees impacted by COVID-19. Many employers have independent policies in place that provide employees with leave options, and the DOL regulations raised questions about when the employer can require the employee to use that leave prior to, or concurrently with, FFCRA leave. Employers cannot require employees to use leave concurrently during the first two weeks of paid sick leave for non-childcare related reasons. Employers can, under some circumstances, require use of employee leave concurrently with expanded FMLA leave for childcare reasons. Employers are only eligible for tax credits with respect to leave paid out under the new law. If the employer requires the employee to use otherwise available employer-paid leave, the tax credit is unavailable with respect to that portion of the employee’s pay. For more information, visit Tax Facts Online. Read More

Families First Coronavirus Response Act: Employee Rights after FFCRA Leave

Employers are generally prohibited from retaliating against employees to take paid sick leave or expanded FMLA leave under the FFCRA. However, the law does not protect employees from layoffs or furloughs undertaken for other reasons, such as the general economic downturn. Exceptions exist for key employees and very small employers with fewer than 25 employees. The exception allows employers to refuse returning the employee to work in the same position if the employee took leave for childcare-related reasons, and all four of the following hardship conditions exist: (1) the position no longer exists due to economic or operating conditions that affect employment and due to COVID-19 related reasons during the period of leave; (2) the employer makes reasonable efforts to restore the employee to the same or an equivalent position; (3) the employer makes reasonable efforts to contact the employee if an equivalent position becomes available; and (4) the employer continues to make reasonable efforts to contact the employee for one year beginning either on the date the leave related to COVID-19 reasons concludes, or the date 12 weeks after the leave began, whichever is earlier. For more information on the FFCRA, visit Tax Facts Online. Read More

Families First Coronavirus Response Act: Moving to Reopen, Employers Begin Evaluating FFCRA Leave Provisions

Now that many more employers are beginning to evaluate whether to reopen as governments relax restrictions, those who have been closed for upwards of two months will have to evaluate whether they must provide paid leave under the FFCRA as COVID-19 continues to spread. The FFCRA paid sick leave and expanded FMLA provisions only applied to employers who continued to operate in the wake of the pandemic–employees who were simply laid off or furloughed were required to seek unemployment benefits. Upon first glance, the new paid leave requirements under the FFCRA seem to provide 12 weeks of paid time off for most small business employees. However, the benefit triggers differ depending on whether the employee is claiming (1) 80 hours paid sick leave or (2) expanded relief under the FMLA. For more information on the benefit triggers, visit Tax Facts Online. Read More

Families First Coronavirus Response Act and CARES Act: Qualifying Healthcare Expenses Eligible for Tax Credits Even for Furloughed Employees

The FFCRA and CARES Act each provide tax credits for employers who continue to pay employee wages through 2020. The amount of wages paid also includes qualifying health expenses that the employer pays on the employee’s behalf. Qualifying health expenses are amounts paid by the employer to maintain a group health plan if the amounts would be excluded from employees’ income under IRC Section 106(a). These expenses should generally be prorated between employees and based on the periods of coverage relating to the payment of wages. Health insurance plans, prescription drug plans, dental and vision plans, health FSAs, HRAs and most employee assistance plans should all qualify. Additionally, the IRS has confirmed that employers can claim the tax credits for qualified healthcare expenses, regardless of whether the employee is paid qualified wages during the same timeframe. As a result, employers who have furloughed employees, but continue to cover healthcare expenses, can claim a tax credit for those expenses. For more information, visit Tax Facts Online. Read More

CARES Act: Telehealth Coverage and HDHP/HSA Eligibility

In response to the evolving COVID-19 pandemic, the CARES Act further expands the pre-deductible services high deductible health plans (HDHPs) may offer. HDHPs are now permitted to cover the cost of telehealth services without cost to participants before the HDHP deductible has been satisfied. HDHPs providing telehealth coverage do not jeopardize their status as HDHPs. Plan members similarly retain the right to fund HSAs after taking advantage of cost-free telehealth services. Under normal rules, HDHPs cannot waive costs for anything other than certain preventative services without jeopardizing HDHP status. Remote health services can be provided under a safe harbor rule through December 31, 2021. For more information on the HDHP qualification rules, visit Tax Facts Online. Read More

CARES Act: Bonus Depreciation Fix, Amended Returns for Partnerships

The CARES Act provided retroactive relief to partnerships on multiple fronts, including by fixing the so-called “retail glitch” to allow businesses to take advantage of 100% bonus depreciation on qualified improvement property through 2022. Existing law may have prevented partnerships from filing amended Forms 1065 and Schedules K-1. Instead, partnerships would have been required to file an administrative adjustment request, so that partners would not have received relief until filing returns for the current tax year. Revenue Procedure 2020-23 allows partnerships to file amended returns and issue revised Schedules K-1 for 2018 and 2019 to take advantage of retroactive CARES Act relief (and, absent further guidance, even if they are not taking advantage of CARES Act relief). The relief applies for 2018 and 2019 as long as the original Forms 1065 and Schedules K-1 were filed/issued before April 13, 2020 (the date Rev. Proc. 2020-23 was released). Partnerships can file amended Form 1065 and Schedule K-1 (electronically or by mail), by checking the Form 1065 “amended return” box and writing “FILED PURSUANT TO REV PROC 2020-23” at the top. The same statement must be included in a statement attached to amended Schedules K-1 sent to partners. The amended returns must be filed/furnished to partners by September 30, 2020. For more information, visit Tax Facts Online. Read More

CARES Act: IRS Guidance on Business Interest Elections

The IRS gives businesses substantial flexibility in making and revoking elections related to business interest expense deductions under the CARES Act. A taxpayer may elect under Section 163(j)(10)(A)(iii) not to apply the 50 percent ATI limitation for a 2019 or 2020 taxable year (2020 only for partnerships). A taxpayer permitted to make the election makes the election not to apply the 50 percent ATI limitation by timely filing a federal income tax return or Form 1065 (or amendments) using the 30 percent ATI limitation. No formal statement is required to make the election. The taxpayer can then later revoke that election by filing an amended return or form. Similarly, to use 2019 ATI for 2020, the taxpayer merely files using 2019 ATI (and can then later revoke that election by filing a timely amended return or form). For more information, visit Tax Facts Online. Read More

CARES Act: IRS Allows Corporations to Use Prior Year AMT Credits Retroactively
The 2017 Tax Act generally repealed the corporate AMT, but also permitted corporations to continue claiming a minimum credit for prior year AMT paid. The credit can generally be carried forward to offset corporate tax liability in a later year. The CARES Act eliminates certain limitations that applied to the carryover provision, so that corporations can claim refunds for their unused AMT credits for the first tax year that began in 2018 (i.e., the corporation can take the entire amount of the refundable credit for 2018). The corporation must submit the application for refund before December 31, 2020 and, for convenience, the IRS has institutes a fax procedure for both AMT credit and NOL refund purposes. For more information, visit Tax Facts Online. Read More

CARES Act: Relief for Qualified Plan Loans
The CARES Act relaxed the rules to provide relief for qualified plan participants with existing plan loans. If a participant had an existing plan loan with a repayment obligation falling between March 27 and December 31, 2020, that repayment obligation was extended for one year. Any subsequent repayment obligations are to be adjusted to reflect this extension. For plan participants who are “qualifying individuals,” the plan loan limits were increased to the greater of $100,000 or 100% of the vested balance in the participant’s account. For more information, visit Tax Facts Online. Read More

CARES Act: Expanded Charitable Donation Deduction for 2020
The CARES Act made several changes designed to encourage charitable giving during the COVID-19 outbreak. For the 2020 tax year, the CARES Act amended IRC Section 62(a), allowing taxpayers to reduce adjusted gross income (AGI) by $300 worth of charitable contributions made in 2020 even if they do not itemize. Under normal circumstances, taxpayers are only permitted to deduct cash contributions to charity to the extent those donations do not exceed 60% of AGI (10% for corporations). The CARES Act lifts the 60% AGI limit for 2020. Cash contributions to public charities and certain private foundations in 2020 are not subject to the AGI limit. Individual taxpayers can offset their income for 2020 up to the full amount of their AGI, and additional charitable contributions can be carried over to offset income in a later year (the amounts are not refundable). The corporate AGI limit was raised to 25% (excess contributions also carry over to subsequent tax years). For more information, visit Tax Facts Online. Read More

CARES Act: IRS Releases Initial Q&A on Qualified Plan Loan & Distribution Provisions
The IRS released the first Q&A in what is likely to be a series of guidance on the CARES Act retirement-related provisions. One overarching issue is the IRS confirmation that plan sponsors can rely upon past guidance issued in response to Hurricane Katrina in 2005 and the RMD waiver in 2009 for help implementing the CARES Act provisions. Under initial guidance, individuals are only eligible for COVID-19 related distributions or loans if they themselves are impacted (qualification cannot currently be based on a spouse or dependent’s job loss). The Q&A also clarifies that increased loan limits are currently available between March 27, 2020 and September 22, 2020. Further, the guidance confirms that the loan and distribution relief is optional for plan sponsors–and sponsors can elect to adopt one provision and not another (including the loan repayment option). For more information on the CARES Act loan provisions, visit Tax Facts Online. Read More

CARES Act: Calculating Qualified Plan Loans and the One-Year Look-back Rule

The CARES Act allows plan sponsors to double the qualified plan loan limit for qualified individuals. Plan loans made between March 27, 2020 and September 23, 2020 are limited to the lesser of (1) $100,000 or (2) 100% of the participant’s vested account balance. Despite this, even if the individual is qualified, plan sponsors must remain aware of the one-year look-back rule. IN reality, the $100,000 limit is reduced by the excess of the employee’s highest outstanding plan loan balance during the one-year period ending on the day before the loan is made, over the employee’s outstanding balance of any plan loan on the date the loan is made (this calculation also includes loans from any other plans maintained by the employer or member of a controlled group). For more information on the qualified plan loan rules, visit Tax Facts Online. Read More

CARES Act: IRS Waives Physical Presence Requirement for Spousal Consent to Participant Benefit Elections

IRC Section 417 generally requires spousal consent to a waiver of a qualified joint and survivor annuity (QJSA), which includes the waiver of a QJSA as part of a participant’s request for a plan distribution or a plan loan (the availability of which were expanded under the CARES Act). The spousal consent must generally be witnessed by a plan representative or notary public in person (the physical presence requirement). Notice 2020-42 provides relief in permitting remote electronic notarization executed via live auto-video technology that satisfies any state-level requirements that apply to a notary public. The relief in Notice 2020-42 applies to any participant election that requires a signature to be witnessed in the physical presence of a plan representative or notary in 2020. For more information on spousal consent requirements, visit Tax Facts Online. Read More

CARES Act: IRS Expands RMD Waiver Relief for 2020

The CARES Act waived all RMD requirements for 2020. Despite this, the law was enacted after some taxpayers had already taken their 2020 RMDs early in the year. For those who took RMDs very early in the year, the 60-day rollover period had already expired. In response, the IRS announced that anyone who took a 2020 RMD is eligible to roll the funds back into their account penalty-free. The 60-day rollover period was extended through August 31, 2020, so clients still have only a limited amount of time in which to act. Further, the rollover does not count toward the otherwise applicable “one rollover per 12-month period” rule or the restriction on rollovers for inherited IRAs. For more information on the RMD rules, visit Tax Facts Online. Read More

Payroll Protection Program: Defining “Payroll Costs” for PPP

Taxpayers with fewer than 500 employees are eligible for new “payroll protection loans” administered via the Small Business Administration. In general, the loans may be forgiven (and amounts excluded from income for tax purposes) if used to cover payroll costs, which are defined in the CARES Act to include the sum of (A) payments of any compensation with respect to employees that is (1) salary, wage, commission, or similar compensation, (2) payment of cash tip or equivalent, (3) payment for vacation, parental, family, medical, or sick leave, (4) allowance for dismissal or separation, (5) payment required for the provisions of group health care benefits, including insurance premiums, (6) payment of any retirement benefit or (7) payment of State or local tax assessed on the compensation of employees; and (B) the sum of payments of any compensation to or income of a sole proprietor or independent contractor that is a wage, commission, income, net earnings from self-employment, or similar compensation that is not more than $100,000 in one year, as prorated for the covered period. Payroll costs exclude (1) compensation of an individual employee over $100,000 per year, as prorated for the covered period, (2) taxes imposed or withheld under chapters 21, 22, or 24 of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986 during the covered period, (3) any compensation of an employee whose principal place of residence is outside of the United States, (4) qualified sick leave wages for which a credit is allowed under the FFCRA or (5) qualified family leave wages for which a credit is allowed under the FFCRA. For more information, visit Tax Facts Online. Read More

Payroll Protection Program: The Finer Points of PPP Loan Forgiveness

Loan forgiveness offers powerful assistance to those small businesses who were actually able to receive Paycheck Protection Program loan funds. However, loan forgiveness is not without its costs. While amounts forgiven will not be included in income under the usual cancellation of indebtedness rules, business owners may not be entitled to their typical business deductions either. Notice 2020-32 clarifies that otherwise allowable deductions are disallowed if the payment of the expense (1) results in loan forgiveness under the PPP loan program and (2) the income associated with the loan forgiveness is excluded from income under CARES Act Section 1106(i). Although legislation proposed in Congress may change this result, small business clients should pay close attention to the potential future tax impact of loan forgiveness. For more information on implications of loan forgiveness, visit Tax Facts Online. Read More

Payroll Protection Program: Guidance on PPP Eligibility

The Treasury has updated its guidance related to the CARES Act Paycheck Protection Program (PPP) loan forgiveness requirements. The Treasury now notes that most companies with adequate sources of alternative liquidity are likely not eligible for the program. In order to qualify for the loans, PPP borrowers are now required to provide a good faith certification stating that current economic conditions and uncertainty make the loan necessary to support ongoing operations. While Treasury calls out public companies with substantial market value and access to the capital markets specifically, the guidance could also impact businesses who have adequate alternative liquidity to support operations. PPP borrowers who find they cannot make the certification in good faith are permitted to return the funds. For more information on the PPP loan rules, visit Tax Facts Online. Read More

Payroll Protection Program: Increased Flexibility for PPP Recipients

PPP loan forgiveness is determined based on how the small business client spent the loan proceeds. Under the PPPFA, at least 60% of the loan must be used for payroll costs (this 60% threshold was reduced from 75% under the CARES Act). Under the terms of the CARES Act, amounts used to cover eligible expenses could be forgiven if used during the eight-week period following the loan origination date. The PPPFA extended the eight-week period to 24 weeks from the date the lender made the first loan payment to the small business owner. Unless Congress acts again, the funds must all be spent by December 31, 2020 in order to be eligible for forgiveness. The amount forgiven can also be reduced if the employer made certain staffing cuts or cut employee compensation levels. The PPPFA gives employers until December 31, 2020 to bring workers back to work/restore wage levels and continue to qualify for loan forgiveness (extended from prior law, which set the deadline at June 30)). Read More

IRS, DOL Announce Extension of COBRA Election Period

Under normal circumstances, an individual has 60 days from the date when a COBRA qualifying event occurs to elect COBRA coverage (or make a new COBRA election). In light of the COVID-19 outbreak, the IRS and DOL have announced an extension of this 60-day window. The 60-day election window is essentially paused for relevant time periods that include March 1, 2020. The clock is stopped and will not resume until the end of the “outbreak period”. The outbreak period is defined as the window of time beginning March 1, 2020 and ending 60 days after the date that the COVID-19 national emergency is declared ended. The 45-day payment clock and 30-day grace period for late COBRA payments are also paused. For more information on the COBRA election rules, visit Tax Facts Online. Read More

DOL Releases New COBRA Notice in Light of Growing Employment Litigation

The DOL released a revised COBRA general notice and election notice on May 1, 2020, in response to increasing furloughs and layoffs in the wake of COVID-19–and a growing risk of employment litigation. Employers are not required to post the new notices, but may wish to in light of the evolving situation. These new notices add information about how Medicare eligibility impacts COBRA eligibility (highlighting the fact that COBRA coverage is usually secondary to Medicare). Employers who use the model notices are deemed to comply with COBRA notice requirements. For more information on COBRA coverage election requirements and COVID-19, visit Tax Facts Online. Read More

IRS Provides Relief for Cafeteria Plan Participants in Response to COVID-19

Under normal circumstances, cafeteria plans are not permitted to allow participants to make mid-year election changes except in limited situations. Notice 2020-29 permits employees to allow certain mid-year elections made during calendar year 2020 that would otherwise be impermissible, including changes to salary reduction contribution elections. The guidance also allows participants to revoke (or make) an election with respect to health and dependent care FSAs on a prospective basis during 2020 to respond to changing needs during the COVID-19 pandemic. Further, the guidance clarifies that the relief for high deductible health plans (HDHPs) and expenses related to COVID-19 (regarding an exemption for telehealth services) may be applied retroactively to January 1, 2020. For more information on the mid-year election rules for cafeteria plans, visit Tax Facts Online. Read More

IRS Makes Temporary & Permanent Changes to the FSA Grace Period Rules

IRS Notice 2020-33 and Notice 2020-29, released concurrently, provides relief with respect to unused funds in a flexible spending account. Under Notice 2020-29, if an employee has unused amounts remaining in a health FSA or a dependent care assistance program at the end of a grace period (or plan year) ending in 2020, a cafeteria plan may permit employees to apply those unused amounts to pay or reimburse medical care expenses or dependent care expenses incurred through December 31, 2020. Notice 2020-33 makes a change to the carryover rules that apply to health FSAs, so that the amount that can be carried over to the following year will equal 20 percent of the maximum inflation-indexed salary reduction amount under Section 125 (increasing the carryover amount from $500 to $550 for 2020). For more information on the rules governing health FSAs, visit Tax Facts Online. Read More

Treasury Allows Tax Credit for Employers Paying Health Expenses of Furloughed Workers

Clearing up confusion (and revising initial guidance), the Treasury has announced that if an employer continues to pay an employee’s health insurance costs during a furlough period, the employer is entitled to claim a tax credit with respect to those expenses. This is the case even if the employer is not currently paying the employee’s wages. The employee retention credit is generally equal to up to 50% of the employee wages and certain other qualifying expenses. For more information on the employee retention tax credit, visit Tax Facts Online. Read More

Required Business Expense Reimbursement in the Age of COVID-19

Some employers are now permitting employees to work from home–while others are requiring it. In some jurisdictions (California and Illinois, for example) employers are required to reimburse employees for employment expenses. This may create the need for employers to reimburse employees for the cost of maintaining a home office. Further, the FLSA does not permit an employer to require an employee to pay for business expenses if doing so would reduce the employee’s earnings to below the minimum wage. However, simply providing cash reimbursement may generate additional taxable income for the employee. The miscellaneous itemized deduction for expenses incurred in the “trade or business of being an employee” was suspended for 2018-2025. Employers may instead wish to consider a program where the employer leases or purchases the required equipment for the employee’s use. For more information on the impact of reimbursing business expenses, visit Tax Facts Online. Read More

Dependent Care FSAs Provide Flexibility in the Face of a Pandemic

With so many employees working from home–and scrambling to find childcare options as businesses begin to reopen–many employees rethinking contributions to dependent care FSAs. The rules governing changes to dependent care FSA contributions are more flexible than health FSAs. Employees are permitted to make mid-year changes in pre-tax contributions if their circumstances relating to the need for dependent care changes. Employees can reduce their contributions if they are working from home and do not need childcare, or can increase the contributions when they return to work and need to provide for increased childcare costs. Further, employees who have been furloughed and laid off might want to ask whether their plan contains a spend-down feature. These features are optional, but allow former employees to seek reimbursement for dependent care expenses incurred through the end of the tax year (even if their employment has been terminated). Employers have the option of adding a spend-down feature at any time. For more information on dependent care FSAs, visit Tax Facts Online. Read More

IRS Provides Relief for Employee Donations of Unused Sick, Vacation & PTO

The IRS has provided relief so that employees can forgo sick, vacation or personal leave because of the COVID-19 pandemic without adverse tax consequences. Under the guidance, an employer can make cash payments to charitable organizations that provide relief to victims of the COVID-19 pandemic in exchange for sick, vacation or personal leave which their employees forgo. Those amounts will not be treated as compensation and the employees will not be treated as receiving the value of the leave as income. Therefore, taxable income will not be increased, but the employee cannot claim a deduction for the leave donated to their employer. Employers, however, may deduct these cash payments as a business expense or as a charitable contribution deduction if the employer otherwise meets the respective requirements of either section. For more information on the charitable contributions, visit Tax Facts Online. Read More

Home Office Deductions in the Age of Covid-19

With so many taxpayers working from home—some indefinitely—do to Covid-19, many are likely wondering whether they can deduct their home office expenses. In short, traditional W-2 employees cannot deduct their home office expenses regardless of whether they would otherwise qualify for the deduction. The 2017 tax reform legislation eliminated this deduction for 2018-2025. Self-employed taxpayers can deduct expenses associated with maintaining a home office if the office is used regularly and exclusively as the taxpayer’s principal place of business (if the office is within the dwelling unit). A home office deduction is permitted for self-employed taxpayers with separate structures if the office/workspace is used “in connection with” the trade or business. For more information on the home office deduction, visit Tax Facts Online. Read More

 

Byrnes & Bloink’s Tax Facts Offers a Complete Web, App-Based, and Print Experience

Reducing complicated tax questions to understandable answers that can be immediately put into real-life practice, Tax Facts works when and where you need it….on your desktop, at home on your laptop, and on the go through your tablet or smartphone.

  • all Tax Facts books
  • Tax Facts Intelligence weekly newsletters
  • weekly strategy articles for client advisory
  • weekly transcribed debate discussion for client soft-skill discussion
  • among other weekly client advisory critical updates

Questions? Contact customer service: TaxFactsHelp@alm.com800-543-0874

Posted in Retirement Planning, Taxation | Tagged: , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Tax Facts’ COVID Weekly by William Byrnes and Robert Bloink (June 22, 2020)

Posted by William Byrnes on June 23, 2020


Texas A&M University School of Law has launched its online wealth management, risk management, and international tax risk management graduate curricula for industry professionals.

Apply now for fall courses that begin in August: Enterprise Risk Analytics; Information Security Risk Management; Terrorism Risk Management; International Tax Risk Management, Data, and Analytics II; International Tax & Tax Treaties I and II; Securities Regulation; Investment & Portfolio Management; Financial Innovation (and Risk)

Texas A&M University is a public university and is ranked 1st among public universities for its superior education at an affordable cost (Fiske, 2018) and ranked 1st of Texas public universities for best value (Money, 2018).

 

Prof. William H. Byrnes
        Robert Bloink, J.D., LL.M.

Yes, there are new PPP Rules that allow a lot more flexibility in qualifying for forgiveness. But this week we also have a number of new rules on employee benefits and compensation issues, including a Supreme Court decision on a defined benefits case.

Increased Flexibility for PPP Recipients

PPP loan forgiveness is determined based on how the small business client spent the loan proceeds. Under the PPPFA, at least 60 percent of the loan must be used for payroll costs (this 60 percent threshold was reduced from 75 percent under the CARES Act The PPPFA extended the eight-week period to twenty-four weeks from the date the lender made the first loan payment to the small business owner. Unless Congress acts again, the funds must all be spent by December 31, 2020 in order to be eligible for forgiveness. The amount forgiven can also be reduced if the employer made certain staffing cuts or cut employee compensation levels. The PPPFA gives employers until December 31, 2020 to bring workers back to work/restore wage levels and continue to qualify for loan forgiveness (extended from prior law, which set the deadline at June 30)). Read More

U.S. Supreme Court: DB Participants Lack Standing to Sue Fiduciaries When Payments are Unaffected

The U.S. Supreme Court has now ruled that ERISA-governed defined benefit plan participants lack standing to sue plan fiduciaries in situations where the participants’ own payments were not impacted. In this case, the plaintiffs sued alleging mismanagement of plan funds and self-dealing. However, the plaintiffs’ own fixed pension payments continued to be paid (the plan in this case was overfunded). The Court held that because the plaintiffs would not be impacted financially by the outcome of the case, they lacked standing to sue under Article III of the U.S. constitution. For more information on DB plan funding requirements, visit Tax Facts Online. Read More

New Foreign Earned Income Exclusion Rules

The bona fide residence test and physical presence test generally provide specific time requirements that apply to individuals claiming a tax exclusion for foreign-earned income. An otherwise qualified individual may still exclude foreign earned income for the period in which the individual was actually present in the foreign country even if the individual fails to meet the time requirements. For more information, visit Tax Facts Online. Read More

IRS Waives Physical Presence Requirement for Spousal Consent to Participant Benefit Elections

IRC Section 417 generally requires spousal consent to a waiver of a qualified joint and survivor annuity (QJSA), which includes the waiver of a QJSA as part of a participant’s request for a plan distribution or a plan loan (the availability of which were expanded under the CARES Act). The spousal consent must generally be witnessed by a plan representative or a notary public in person (the physical presence requirement). Notice 2020-42 provides relief in permitting remote electronic notarization executed via live auto-video technology that satisfies any state-level requirements that apply to a notary public. For more information on spousal consent requirements, visit Tax Facts Online. Read More

 

Byrnes & Bloink’s Tax Facts Offers a Complete Web, App-Based, and Print Experience

Reducing complicated tax questions to understandable answers that can be immediately put into real-life practice, Tax Facts works when and where you need it….on your desktop, at home on your laptop, and on the go through your tablet or smartphone.

  • all Tax Facts books
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  • among other weekly client advisory critical updates

Questions? Contact customer service: TaxFactsHelp@alm.com800-543-0874

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Byrnes & Bloink’s TaxFacts Intelligence Weekly for Financial Advisors (March 16, 2020)

Posted by William Byrnes on March 16, 2020


Texas A&M University School of Law has launched its online wealth management, risk management, and international tax risk management graduate curricula for industry professionals. Apply now for Summer courses that begin May: FATCA & CRS Risk Management; International Tax Risk Management, Data, and Analytics I  Texas A&M University is a public university and is ranked 1st among public universities for its superior education at an affordable cost (Fiske, 2018) and ranked 1st of Texas public universities for best value (Money, 2018). To apply for Summer, call or fill in the form https://law.tamu.edu/distance-education/

Editor’s Note: Reconciliation abounds! You need to reconcile your advance premium tax credit payments, the Supreme Court needs to reconcile the ACA without the individual mandate, and employers need to reconcile employee withholdings with the new regs.
Do you (or your clients) receive advance premium tax credit payments? If you haven’t squared them away with 2019 income levels that might delay the return. Also, with new withholding regs it’s a good idea for employers to take a second look at employee allowances.
Finally, the Supreme Court will (again) look at the constitutionality of the ACA. Recall that the last time this happened constitutionality hinged on Congress’ ability to tax, with Chief justice Roberts noting that the Aca was clearly tax legislation since the individual mandate penalty was implemented through the tax code. Now that the individual mandate has been repealed, how will the ACA fare under additional scrutiny? Tune in next year to find out!
And wash your hands!
Tax Season Tip: Failure to Reconcile Advance Premium Tax Credit Payments May Delay Returns

The IRS has released guidance reminding taxpayers who received advance payments of their premium tax credit throughout the year of their obligation to reconcile those payments with respect to their actual household income levels for 2019. Taxpayers have the option of choosing to have premium tax credits applied directly to their monthly insurance premiums. For more information on the premium tax credit, visit Tax Facts Online. Read More

Supreme Court to Once Again Consider ACA Viability

The U.S. Supreme Court has agreed to hear arguments and rule on the continued constitutionality of the Affordable Care Act. The Court may decide whether the remainder of the ACA is constitutional absent the individual mandate. Arguments in the case are set to be heard in October, after the election, and a decision is unlikely before 2021. For more information on the individual mandate, visit Tax Facts Online. Read More
Determining the Employer’s Obligations Under the New Proposed Withholding Regulations

The regulations are clear that the employer is not required to ascertain whether the withholding allowance claimed by the employee is greater than those to which the employee is actually entitled. However, the IRS (or published guidance) may direct an employer to submit employees’ withholding certificates (or the certificates relating to groups of employees) to the IRS. Further, the IRS may notify the employer that an employee is not entitled to claim more than a certain withholding allowance. For more information on the new withholding regulations, visit Tax Facts Online. Read More

2020’s Tax Facts Offers a Complete Web, App-Based, and Print Experience

Reducing complicated tax questions to understandable answers that can be immediately put into real-life practice, Tax Facts works when and where you need it….on your desktop, at home on your laptop, and on the go through your tablet or smartphone.  Questions? Contact customer service: TaxFactsHelp@alm.com800-543-0874

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Byrnes & Bloink’s TaxFacts Intelligence Weekly for Financial Advisors (December 12 edition)

Posted by William Byrnes on December 12, 2019


Texas A&M University School of Law has launched its International Tax online graduate curriculum for tax professionals. Apply now for Jan 13 – April 19 transfer pricing courses.  Texas A&M University is a public university and is ranked 1st among public universities for its superior education at an affordable cost (Fiske, 2018) and ranked 1st of Texas public universities for best value (Money, 2018). To apply for the inaugural cohort opportunity, contact Jeff Green, Graduate Programs Coordinator, T: +1 (817) 212-3866, E: jeffgreen@law.tamu.edu or contact David Dye, Assistant Dean of Graduate Programs, T (817) 212-3954, E: ddye@law.tamu.edu. Texas A&M Admissions website: https://law.tamu.edu/distance-education/international-tax

IRS Provides New ACA Transition Relief for Employer Reporting

As usual, the IRS has released transition relief to extend the deadline for providing Form 1095-C to individuals from January 31, 2020 to March 2, 2020. However, unlike other years, the March 2 deadline is now a firm deadline and the IRS has indicated that it will no longer respond to requests for extension beyond that deadline. Form 1094-C and Form 1095-C that must be provided to the IRS are not subject to the extension. The employer must furnish these filings to the IRS by February 28, 2020 if the filing is on paper and March 31, 2020 if the employer is filing electronically. For 2019 forms, the IRS has extended the relief that may allow employers to escape liability if they make a good faith effort to comply with all filing requirements. Because the individual mandate has been reduced to $0, the IRS will also not impose a penalty under IRC Section 6722 upon employers who fail to provide Form 1095-B if certain requirements are satisfied. For more information, visit Tax Facts Online. Read More

December 31 Deadline to Take Full Advantage of Opportunity Zone Deferral is Fast Approaching

The Tax Cuts and Jobs Act introduced opportunity zones into the tax code, which allow taxpayers to defer certain gains if certain deadlines and requirements are satisfied. However, the law only gives taxpayers a limited amount of time to take full advantage of the deferral provisions. Specifically, December 31, 2019, is the deadline for taxpayers who wish to make opportunity zone investments and take full advantage of the 15% step-up in the deferred gains. Taxpayers who invest after this deadline (but before December 31, 2020) and hold the opportunity zone investment through 2026 will be entitled to take 10% step-up in basis (10% of the amount deferred) on the deferred tax. For more information on the opportunity zone rules, including the gain deferral provision, visit Tax Facts Online. Read More

Unpacking the New Section 6050Y Reporting Requirements for Life Insurance Reportable Policy Sales

The new 6050Y regulations create new reporting obligations for many who issue, acquire or sell life insurance policies in a reportable policy sale post-tax reform. An “issuer” under the new regulations is anyone that bears any part of the risk associated with the life insurance contract, including those collecting premiums and paying death benefits. However, where there are multiple issuers, the reporting obligations are satisfied if only one issuer or designee reports on a timely basis. New forms released by the IRS to complete the reporting obligations include Form 1099-LS, Reportable Life Insurance Sale and Form 1099-SB, Seller’s Investment in Life Insurance Contract. While some reporting requirements have been delayed, it’s important to understand the basics of these forms now. Form 1099-LS must be filed by anyone who acquires a life insurance policy (or interest therein) in a reportable policy sale. Basic information about the sale, policy, acquirer and seller must be included. Form 1099-SB must be filed by the issuer of the life insurance policy to report both the seller’s investment in the contract and the surrender amount if the sale is a reportable policy sale (or transferred to a foreign person). For more information on the new 6050Y reporting requirements, visit Tax Facts Online. Read More

2020’s Tax Facts Offers a Complete Web, App-Based, and Print Experience

Reducing complicated tax questions to understandable answers that can be immediately put into real-life practice, Tax Facts works when and where you need it….on your desktop, at home on your laptop, and on the go through your tablet or smartphone.  Questions? Contact customer service: TaxFactsHelp@alm.com800-543-0874

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Byrnes & Bloink’s Thanksgiving TaxFacts Intelligence for Wealth Advisors

Posted by William Byrnes on December 3, 2019


Texas A&M University School of Law has launched its International Tax online curriculum for graduate degree candidates. Admissions is open for Jan 13 – April 19 transfer pricing courses.  Texas A&M University is a public university and is ranked 1st among public universities for its superior education at an affordable cost (Fiske, 2018) and ranked 1st of Texas public universities for best value (Money, 2018). To apply for the inaugural cohort opportunity, contact Jeff Green, Graduate Programs Coordinator, T: +1 (817) 212-3866, E: jeffgreen@law.tamu.edu or contact David Dye, Assistant Dean of Graduate Programs, T (817) 212-3954, E: ddye@law.tamu.edu. Texas A&M Admissions website: https://law.tamu.edu/distance-education/international-tax

Often-Overlooked Section 1202 Tax Break for Small Business Adds New Value Post-Reform

Section 1202, while often overlooked by small business owners and investors alike, can provide a valuable tax benefit post-reform because many small businesses have transitioned to C corporation status to take advantage of the simpler 21 percent corporate tax rate. Section 1202 allows for an exclusion of up to 100 percent of gain realized when qualified small business stock is sold. To qualify, the stock must be acquired by the taxpayer when the stock was originally issued and held for at least five years. Further, the Section 1202 stock exclusion only applies to stock in C corporations with active businesses and assets of $50 million or less (measured when the stock is issued). Excluded gains are limited to the greater of: $10 million or 10 times the basis of the qualified small business stock. For more information on the exclusion, visit Tax Facts Online. Read More

IRS Expands Nondiscrimination Relief for Closed Defined Benefit Plans

Although the IRS has previously extended the nondiscrimination relief for closed DB plans in Notice 2014-5, newly released Notice 2019-60 also expands the relief to include relief from benefits, rights and features testing for closed plans. To qualify, the plan must have closed via amendments adopted before December 13, 2013. Notice 2019-60 does not change prior relief, but adds additional relief. Closed plans’ benefits, rights and features are treated as satisfying testing if the benefits, rights and features were provided at the time of the amendment closing the plan and one of two conditions are satisfied: (1) no amendments were adopted after January 29, 2016 that expanded or restricted eligibility for the benefits, rights and features or (2) if there was such an amendment, the benefit, right or feature does not benefit a relatively larger proportion of highly compensated employees (measured using the plan’s ratio percentage) than before the amendment. This relief is available for plan years ending after November 13, 2019 and before January 1, 2021. For more information on defined benefit plan nondiscrimination testing, visit Tax Facts Online. Read More

Advisory Fees Withdrawn From Annuity Not Treated as Distributions to the Owner

A recent IRS letter ruling found that investment advisory fees paid periodically from an annuity contract case value should not be treated as amounts received by the contract owner. The annuities in this case were nonqualified deferred annuities. As part of the annuity, the product owner would receive investment advice from a licensed advisor on how to allocate the case value of the contract. The fees were to be negotiated in an arm’s length transaction, but were not to exceed 1.5 percent of the annuity cash value. The fees were paid directly to the advisor (in other words, the owner would never receive the amounts deducted from the annuity value). The IRS found the fees “integral” to operation of the annuity contract based on the fact that the owner would receive ongoing investment advice. Further, the fees did not compensate the advisor for services related to any other asset (other than the annuity). The IRS concluded that the fees were an expense of the contract, not distributions to the owner. For more information on the tax treatment of nonqualified annuities, visit Tax Facts Online. Read More

2020’s Tax Facts Offers a Complete Web, App-Based, and Print Experience

Reducing complicated tax questions to understandable answers that can be immediately put into real-life practice, Tax Facts works when and where you need it….on your desktop, at home on your laptop, and on the go through your tablet or smartphone.  Questions? Contact customer service: TaxFactsHelp@alm.com800-543-0874

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Byrnes & Bloink’s November 21 TaxFacts Intelligence for Wealth Advisors

Posted by William Byrnes on November 22, 2019


Texas A&M University School of Law has launched its International Tax online curriculum for graduate degree candidates. Admissions is open for Jan 13 – April 19 transfer pricing courses.  Texas A&M University is a public university and is ranked 1st among public universities for its superior education at an affordable cost (Fiske, 2018) and ranked 1st of Texas public universities for best value (Money, 2018). To apply for the inaugural cohort opportunity, contact Jeff Green, Graduate Programs Coordinator, T: +1 (817) 212-3866, E: jeffgreen@law.tamu.edu or contact David Dye, Assistant Dean of Graduate Programs, T (817) 212-3954, E: ddye@law.tamu.edu. Texas A&M Admissions website: https://law.tamu.edu/distance-education/international-tax

IRS Proposes New Life Expectancy Tables for Calculation IRA & 401(k) RMDs

The IRS has released new proposed life expectancy tables that would be used in calculating required minimum distributions from both IRAs and employer-sponsored retirement plans. The new tables generally assume longer life expectancies and provide information needed to calculate RMDs for participants living to 120 (the current tables stop at 115). For most clients, the primary impact will be seen in lower required distributions beginning in 2021 Individuals taking RMDs from inherited accounts will also be entitled to switch to the new life expectancy tables under a proposed transition rule, as will those clients currently receiving substantially equal periodic payments. For more information on the RMD rules, visit Tax Facts Online. Read More

IRS Releases Proposed Regulations Implementing Tax Reform Changes to Eligible Terminated S Corporations

The IRS has released proposed regulations that would implement some of the tax reform changes that apply to S corporations that convert to C corporation status. Under tax reform, certain adjustments under IRC Section 481(a) that are required because of the revocation of the S corporation election of an “eligible terminated S corporation” (ETSC) are taken into account ratably during the six tax years beginning with the year of the change (under previous law, most changes had to be accounted for within a one-year period). The proposed regulations’ “no newcomers rule” clarifies that an ETSC is defined as one that (1) was an S corporation on December 21, 2017, (2) during the two-year period beginning on December 22, 2017, revokes its S corporation election, and (3) all of the owners of the corporation on December 22, 2017 are the same as on the day the election is revoked (in identical proportions). The proposed regulations also implement a “snapshot approach” to determining the ratio needed to make allocations under the rules. For more information, visit Tax Facts Online. Read More

Participating in Two Retirement Plans? Need-to-Know Information on Contribution Limits

In today’s day and age, many clients may participate in more than one employer-sponsored retirement plan. This means that clients must understand the deferral limits that limit the amount that can be contributed on a tax-preferred basis each year. The elective deferral limit is a per-person limit, meaning that each client gets one amount per year (for most clients, the 2019 deferral limit is $19,000, or $25,000 for clients who have reached age 50). This means that clients participating in two 401(k) plans can make $19,000 in pre-tax contributions, spread between the two plans (457(b) plans and 403(b) plans are not subject to this aggregation rule). A second limit, known as an “annual additions limit”, governs the total employer and employee contributions that can be made in a single year. For 2020, that limit is $576,000 and $632,000 for clients 50 and up. The annual additions limit applies to plans offered by a single company, or by companies that are related. Clients participating in two plans sponsored by unrelated companies should be aware that a separate annual additions limit applies to each plan. For more information on the rules governing elective deferrals, visit Tax Facts Online. Read More

2020’s Tax Facts Offers a Complete Web, App-Based, and Print Experience

Reducing complicated tax questions to understandable answers that can be immediately put into real-life practice, Tax Facts works when and where you need it….on your desktop, at home on your laptop, and on the go through your tablet or smartphone.  Questions? Contact customer service: TaxFactsHelp@alm.com800-543-0874

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Byrnes & Bloink’s TaxFacts Intelligence Weekly – Actionable Analysis for Financial Advisors

Posted by William Byrnes on November 18, 2019


Texas A&M University School of Law has launched its International Tax online curriculum for graduate degree candidates. Admissions is open for Spring (January) semester for the transfer pricing courses.  Texas A&M University is a public university of the state of Texas and is ranked 1st among public universities for its superior education at an affordable cost (Fiske, 2018) and ranked 1st of Texas public universities for best value (Money, 2018). 

Final 401(k) Hardship Distribution Rules Take Effect January 1, 2020

Plan participants and sponsors should note that the final regulations governing 401(k) hardship distributions take effect in 2020. As of 2020, participants who take a hardship distribution must now be permitted to continue to make deferrals within the six months following the hardship distribution. While some aspects of the new rules are optional, this new requirement is mandatory with respect to qualified plans. For more information on hardship distributions, visit Tax Facts Online. Read More

IRS Releases Proposed Regs on Accounting for Advance Payments

The IRS has released proposed regulations implementing changes made by the 2017 tax reform legislation that impact the tax treatment of advance payments. The regulations generally adopt the rules contained in Revenue Procedure 2004-34— the approach in place prior to tax reform. For more information on the tax treatment of advance payments, visit Tax Facts Online. Read More

IRS FAQ Provides for Specific Identification in Transactions Involving Virtual Currency

The recently released FAQ on the tax treatment of virtual currency confirms that transactions in bitcoin and other forms of virtual currency will be taxed as transactions in property. The guidance goes further and answers the question of whether taxpayers should identify particular virtual currency that is part of a transaction. For more information on the tax treatment of bitcoin, visit Tax Facts Online. Read More

2020’s Tax Facts Offers a Complete Web, App-Based, and Print Experience

Reducing complicated tax questions to understandable answers that can be immediately put into real-life practice, Tax Facts works when and where you need it….on your desktop, at home on your laptop, and on the go through your tablet or smartphone.  Questions? Contact customer service: TaxFactsHelp@alm.com800-543-0874

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Byrnes & Bloink’s TaxFacts Intelligence Weekly – Actionable Analysis for Financial Advisors

Posted by William Byrnes on November 9, 2019


2020’s Tax Facts Offers a Complete Web, App-Based, and Print Experience

Reducing complicated tax questions to understandable answers that can be immediately put into real-life practice, Tax Facts works when and where you need it….on your desktop, at home on your laptop, and on the go through your tablet or smartphone.  Questions? Contact customer service: TaxFactsHelp@alm.com800-543-0874

Texas A&M University School of Law has launched its International Tax online curriculum for graduate degree candidates. Admissions is open for Spring (January) semester for the transfer pricing courses.  Texas A&M University is a public university of the state of Texas and is ranked 1st among public universities for its superior education at an affordable cost (Fiske, 2018) and ranked 1st of Texas public universities for best value (Money, 2018). 

199A Rental Real Estate Safe Harbor Excludes Certain Businesses

Not all taxpayers will be able to take advantage of the Section 199A safe harbor for rental real estate. While the safe harbor does apply to residential rental real estate, taxpayers are not entitled to rely upon the safe harbor if the taxpayer uses the property as a residence during the tax year. Notably, if the real estate is rented or leased under a triple net lease, the safe harbor remains unavailable under the final rule. When satisfying the “hours of rental real estate services” criteria, only certain activities are counted toward the 250-hour threshold. Activities such as rent collection, advertising the rental, property maintenance, negotiating leases and managing the real property generally count toward the threshold. However, the taxpayer’s activities as an “investor” are not counted. Similarly, if any property within the rental real estate enterprise is classified as a specified service trade or business, the safe harbor is unavailable for the entire business. For more information on the final safe harbor rule, visit Tax Facts Online. Read More

DOL Proposes New Electronic Disclosure Rules for Pension Plans

In response to the Trump administration’s executive order, the DOL has proposed a safe harbor rule that would allow pension plans to satisfy disclosure obligations electronically. As currently proposed, the rule only applies to pension plans. It would allow plan sponsors to email required documents to participants, beneficiaries and any other individuals entitled to receive disclosures–so long as the individual has provided an email address (which can be a work email address). Any documents required under Title I of ERISA could be furnished electronically, including notices of material modification or blackout notices, except for documents that must be furnished upon request. While employers are not yet entitled to rely upon this rule until it is finalized, it provides important insight into potential future developments surrounding pension disclosure obligations. For more information on the requirements that apply to pension plans, visit Tax Facts Online. Read More

District Court Rules Small Business Qualified Retirement Plan Not Exempt in Bankruptcy

While 401(k) funds are generally exempt from a bankruptcy debtor’s estate, a recent district court ruling highlights a situation where a small business owner may lose the exemption. In this case, the taxpayer maintained a pension plan pursuant to a prototype plan document offered by his financial institution that had been approved via an IRS opinion letter, as is commonly the case. The court, however, found that amendments to the prototype plan document rendered the opinion invalid. Further, it found that the plan inappropriately benefitted the taxpayer and his spouse, rather than providing benefits to employees, in violation of IRS nondiscrimination rules. Because of this, the plan was deemed to be disqualified despite the fact that the taxpayer relied upon advisors to manage the plan. Because the taxpayer was owner of the small business responsible for the plan, he was deemed to be materially responsible for the qualification failure, therefore causing the plan assets to lose the typically available bankruptcy exemption. The court noted that this probably wouldn’t have been the case if the taxpayer had been an employee participating in a non-qualified plan. For more information on the treatment of 401(k) assets in bankruptcy, visit Tax Facts Online. Read More

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Byrnes & Bloink’s TaxFacts Intelligence Weekly – Actionable Analysis for Financial Advisors

Posted by William Byrnes on September 20, 2019


2019’s Tax Facts Offers a Complete Web, App-Based, and Print Experience

Reducing complicated tax questions to understandable answers that can be immediately put into real-life practice, Tax Facts works when and where you need it….on your desktop, at home on your laptop, and on the go through your tablet or smartphone.  Questions? Contact customer service: TaxFactsHelp@alm.com800-543-0874

Texas A&M University School of Law has launched its International Tax online curriculum for graduate degree candidates. Admissions is open for Spring (January) semester for the transfer pricing courses.  Texas A&M University is a public university of the state of Texas and is ranked 1st among public universities for its superior education at an affordable cost (Fiske, 2018) and ranked 1st of Texas public universities for best value (Money, 2018). 

IRS Releases Guidance on Failure to Cash Distribution Checks

The IRS has released guidance providing that when a check for a fully taxable distribution from a qualified plan is mailed to a plan participant, but not cashed, it is considered to have been “actually distributed” from the plan and is taxable to the participant in the year of distribution. Further, the failure to cash the check did not change the plan administrator’s withholding obligations with respect to the distribution and did not change the obligation to report the distribution on Form 1099-R (assuming the distribution exceeds the applicable reporting threshold). Despite these findings, the IRS was careful to note that it continues to consider the issue of uncashed distribution checks in situations involving missing participants. For more information on the withholding requirements that may apply to qualified plan distributions, visit Tax Facts Online. Read More

December 31 Opportunity Zone Deadline Fast Approaching

Investors who are considering an opportunity zone investment should be advised that now is the time to take advantage of the new rules in order to maximize the potential for deferral. December 31, 2019 is the final day that investors can elect to roll their gains into opportunity zone funds in order to obtain the full 15% reduction in the amount of the deferred gain. Generally, taxpayers can defer capital gains tax by rolling gains into a qualified opportunity fund (gains may be deferred until December 31, 2026). If the investment is held for at least seven years, the taxpayer will receive a 15% reduction in the amount of the deferred gain (so that the funds are invested for a full seven years). In turn, the fund has 180 days to acquire qualified property once the taxpayer invests the gain. Because gain on the sale of Section 1231 property is not determined until year-end, taxpayers wishing to roll over Section 1231 gain should be advised to track 1231 sales carefully to determine whether such sales will result in gain (treated as long-term capital gain) or loss (treated as ordinary loss). For more information on the opportunity zone rules, visit Tax Facts Online. Read More

IRS Extends Nondiscrimination Relief for Closed Defined Benefit Plans

Many employers who have closed defined benefit plans to new participants have continued to allow groups of “grandfathered” employees to earn benefits under the closed defined benefit plans. Because of this, many of these plans have had difficulties meeting the applicable nondiscrimination requirements as more of these grandfathered employees become “highly compensated” over time. Proposed regulations published in 2016 contain special rules to make it easier for these plans to satisfy the nondiscrimination requirements and Notice 2014-5 was released to provide temporary relief if certain conditions are satisfied. The proposed regulations modify the rules applicable to defined benefit replacement allocations (DBRAs) that allow some allocations to be disregarded when determining whether a defined contribution plan has a broadly available allocation rate in order to allow more allocations to satisfy the rules. Further, the regulations provide a special nondiscrimination testing rule that can apply if a benefit or plan feature is only made available to grandfathered employees in a closed plan. In anticipation of the finalization of these regulations, Notice 2019-49 expands the nondiscrimination relief to plan years beginning before 2021, so long as the conditions in Notice 2014-5 are satisfied. For more information the nondiscrimination rules, visit Tax Facts Online. Read More

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TaxFacts Intelligence Weekly of Aug 29, 2019 – Actionable Analysis for Financial Advisors

Posted by William Byrnes on August 30, 2019


2019’s Tax Facts Offers a Complete Web, App-Based, and Print Experience

Reducing complicated tax questions to understandable answers that can be immediately put into real-life practice, Tax Facts works when and where you need it….on your desktop, at home on your laptop, and on the go through your tablet or smartphone.  Questions? Contact customer service: TaxFactsHelp@alm.com800-543-0874

Tuition Waiver for International Tax Online Courses (more information here)

Texas A&M University School of Law will launch August 26, 2019 its International Tax online curriculum for graduate degree candidates. Admissions is open for the inaugural cohort of degree candidates to pilot the launch of the Fall semester introductory courses of international taxation and tax treaties, and provide weekly feedback on content, support, and general experience in exchange for waiving the tuition and providing the books free.  Texas A&M University is a public university of the state of Texas and is ranked 1st among public universities for its superior education at an affordable cost (Fiske, 2018) and ranked 1st of Texas public universities for best value (Money, 2018). 

IRS Reverses Stance on Lenient Enforcement of ACA Employer Mandate

In a recent reversal of practice, in the early weeks of August the IRS began issuing Notice 972CG to employers informing them that they owe substantial penalties for failing to strictly comply with the ACA employer mandate. Generally, the Notice is sent to inform employers who have made late or incorrect filings of Forms 1094-C and 1095-C that penalties now apply (the current notices generally apply for mistakes made in 2017). The penalty that applied in 2017 was $260 per return ($50 per return if the filing was made within 30 days of the original due date). Employers must respond to the Notice 972CG within 45 days (from the date listed on the notice) or the IRS will bill the employer for the penalty amount listed. If the employer disagrees in whole or part with the proposed penalty, box B or box C of the notice should be checked and the employer must submit a signed statement detailing the disagreement, including supporting documentation if applicable. Generally, the employer will be required to explain that the late or incorrect filing was due to reasonable cause. For more information on responding to this notice and other correspondence that the employer may receive with respect to the employer mandate, visit Tax Facts Online. Read More

The Latest Tax Scam: Beware Fake IRS Letters

Nearly every taxpayer has heard warnings about phone-based IRS scams, assuming they have not experienced the calls themselves. However, because the general advice to avoid falling prey to these scams is often accompanied by the advice “the IRS will only contact you via U.S. mail” to initiate a dispute, scammers have now begun sending fake IRS letters–at the exact point in the year when legitimate IRS mail correspondence is at its highest. To avoid falling prey to letter-based scams, keep in mind that IRS letters arrive in government envelopes and provide a notice or letter number in the top right corner, along with a truncated version of your tax ID number. The tax year in question will also appear in the top right corner. A contact telephone number–usually a “1-800” number will appear. If the letter contains what appears to be a personal phone number, you can verify by visiting irs.gov, where legitimate contact information will be posted. Also keep in mind that the IRS will not send threats, such as threats of arrest or deportation. For more information on federal income tax filing requirements, visit Tax Facts Online.Read More

Own an S Corporation? Here’s How to Fix a Violation of the S Corp Requirements

For many clients, making the election to be taxed as an S corporation can have substantial benefits–but also carries the burden of risking disqualification if the business fails to meet the requirements governing S corporations. Selling shares to an impermissible shareholder (such as a partnership), violating the “one class of stock” rule can result in automatic revocation of the S status. To prevent this, the business must show the IRS that the violation was inadvertent, which can be accomplished by submitting a ruling request explaining how the violation occurred. Generally, the S corporation should seek to demonstrate to the IRS that it took remedial action as soon as it learned of the violation, explain the circumstances involved and how the S corporation discovered the violation, in which case the IRS may grant retroactive relief–so that it is treated as though no violation occurred at all. For more information on the specific requirements that an S corporation must satisfy, visit Tax Facts Online. Read More

Tax Facts Team
Molly Miller
Publisher
William H. Byrnes, J.D., LL.M
Tax Facts Author
Jason Gilbert, J.D.
Senior Editor
Robert Bloink, J.D., LL.M.
Tax Facts Author
Connie L. Jump
Senior Manager, Editorial Operations
Alexis Long, J.D.
Senior Contributor
Patti O’Leary
Senior Editorial Assistant
Danielle Birdsail
Digital Marketing Manager
Emily Brunner
Editorial Assistant

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TaxFacts Intelligence Weekly – Actionable Analysis for Financial Advisors (August 15th release)

Posted by William Byrnes on August 16, 2019


Tuition Waiver for International Tax Online Courses (more information here) Texas A&M University School of Law International Tax online curriculum. Deadline is August 26 to apply, Transcripts must be received by September 3.  Books free as well, as well as access to LexisNexis and Texas A&M’s online tax library.

DOL Releases Final MEP Regulations

The DOL has released its final regulations governing multiple employer plans (MEPs). In general, to qualify as an MEP under the final regulations, a plan must satisfy five basic requirements. First, the association must have at least one substantial business purpose that is not related to offering the plan. The employer-members of the association must control its activities and any employers that participate in the MEP must control the MEP in substance and in form, directly or indirectly. The association must adopt a formal organizational structure. Only employees of the association’s employer-members and certain working owners may participate in the MEP. Finally, some commonality of interest must exist between the employers participating in the MEP, such as the same industry or geographic location. The regulations are effective September 30, 2019. For more information on small business retirement planning options, visit Tax Facts Online. Read More

IRS Announces Campaign Aimed at Holders of Virtual Currency

The IRS has announced that it will begin sending letters to holders of various forms of cryptocurrency informing those taxpayers of potential misreporting (or failure to report) on virtual currency transactions. The IRS advises taxpayers who receive such a letter to review past tax filings to uncover any errors or underreporting, and amend those returns in order to pay back taxes, interest and penalties as soon as possible. These letters are part of a larger campaign designed by the IRS to crack down on misreporting or underreporting of virtual currency transactions, which are currently taxed according to the rules governing transactions in property. For more information on the tax treatment of virtual currency, visit Tax Facts Online. Read More

IRS Provides Summertime Tax Checkup Tips

The IRS has released a list of summertime tax tips to help clients avoid surprises as we move closer to the end of the summer, especially with respect to part-time and seasonal workers. The IRS reminds business owners of the need to withhold Social Security and Medicare taxes from part-time and seasonal employees’ pay even if the worker is unlikely to meet the federal income tax filing threshold. Further, business owners must pay close attention to properly classifying these workers as either employees or independent contractors, remembering that independent contractors, although not subject to withholding, are required to pay their own Social Security and Medicare taxes, in addition to applicable income taxes. For more information on the Social Security and Medicare tax requirements, visit Tax Facts Online. Read More

 

2019’s Tax Facts Offers a Complete Web, App-Based, and Print Experience

Tax Facts, authored by renown experts William Byrnes and Robert Bloink, for 60 years continues to be the leading tax book and online strategic client resource for the financial professional and advanced products underwriter industry. Reducing complicated tax questions to understandable answers that can be immediately put into a client’s solution. Contact customer service: TaxFactsHelp@alm.com800-543-0874

 

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TaxFacts Intelligence Weekly

Posted by William Byrnes on December 3, 2018


TAX DEVELOPMENTS

SEC Announces New Disclosure Requirements for Variable Annuities and Life Insurance 
The SEC recently proposed a rule change designed to improve disclosures with respect to variable annuities and variable life insurance contracts. The new disclosure obligations would help investors understand the features, fees and risks to these types of products in an effort to allow investors to make more informed investment decisions. Under the proposal, annuity and life insurance carriers would be entitled to provide information to investors in a summary prospectus form that would provide a more concise summary of the terms of the contract. For more information on variable annuities, visit Tax Facts Online and Read More.

Digging Into the Details of Hardship Distributions for Primary Residence Purchases
Qualified plans can to allow participants to take hardship distributions to help with the purchase of a primary residence. The distribution must be directly taken to purchase the residence–items such as renovations made prior to move-in do not qualify. Despite this, the distribution can cover more than just the purchase price of the residence itself. Closing costs would also qualify, as would the cost of a piece of land upon which the primary residence would be built. If a participant buys out a former spouse’s interest in a jointly-owned home pursuant to divorce, the distribution would also qualify. For more information on the hardship distribution rules, visit Tax Facts Online and Read More.
Avoiding Gift Tax Traps This Holiday Season
Most taxpayers believe that they are not required to file a gift tax tax return if they do not owe gift taxes–as many will not because of the current $11.18 million gift tax exemption will shield most donors from gift tax liability. Despite this, each gift made during a donor’s lifetime serves to reduce that $11.18 million amount, which applies both to lifetime gifts and transfers made at death. Taxpayers must file Form 709 to report taxable gifts in excess of the annual exclusion amount to avoid potential IRS penalties for failure to file a return. The form is required not because gift taxes are owed, but to provide the IRS with a mechanism for tracking any given taxpayer’s use of the exemption amount during life. For more information on the gift tax filing requirements, visit Tax Facts Online and Read More.

Posted in Retirement Planning, Taxation | Tagged: , | 1 Comment »

Will Trump Keep His Promise that No One’s Retirement Will Be Taken Away?

Posted by William Byrnes on November 16, 2017


The 2017 Tax Reform discussion originally was, like the 1986 discussion, about whether the Internal Revenue Code should be used for incentives and subsidy in favor of a particular activity or particular group of taxpayers. Broaden the base, lower the rates, simplify the variations, exceptions, and exemptions. But the dueling Chamber proposals are now out and tax reform based on equity and on eliminating tax-incentives was dead on arrival. It the same old ‘every interest’ vying for a portion of the pie. That’s the democratic, political “Gulchi Gulch” process. What is my interest then? I work for a public research university. I have ‘a dog in this fight’ described below. Hope that the government relations staff of NTEU, of state universities, and of other government employee stakeholder groups raise their voices like the Seraphim to the Republican members of the Finance Committee that are willing to listen.

So what’s so alarmed me to divert my attention to the retirement provisions of the Senate Chair’s mark? Did not the President state that retirement would be left alone (see his tweet here)?  Appears the Senate ignored him as usual.

The Senate Finance Committee Chair slipped in (at page 178) an explosive measure for government employees that also impacts public academic institutions. The Senate Finance Committee Tax Reform Chair’s Mark under the current status (November 9, 2017) will limit public employees to one aggregate amount of $18,500 for retirement plans 403(B) and 457 as of January 1, 2018.

Finance Committee Chair Proposal: The proposal applies a single aggregate limit to contributions for an employee in a governmental section 457(b) plan and elective deferrals for the same employee under a section 401(k) plan or a 403(b) plan of the same employer. Thus, the limit for governmental section 457(b) plans is coordinated with the limit for section 401(k) and 403(b) plans in the same manner as the limits are coordinated under present law for elective deferrals to section 401(k) and section 403(b) plans.

Government, including public educational institution, employees needs to become immediately aware that this provision will critically reduce their ability to contribute to their employer retirement plan(s) by $18,500 (or $24,500 for employees 50 years and older) as of January 1, 2018.  Thus, while there is still time to make December 1st contribution changes to preserve the last year of the additional $18,000 (or $24,000 if at least 50 years of age), these employees need to arrange with their payroll officers to contribute before December 31st any difference between what is allowed in 2017 and what has actually been contributed. As of January 1, 2018, the ability to contribute is gone forever.

Hatch Amendment #2 An amendment to the catch up contribution rules for section 401(k), 403(b) and 457)(b) retirement savings plans. Description of Amendment: This amendment would require all catch up contributions to section 401(k), 403(b) and 457(b) retirement savings plans to be Roth only, and increase the $6,000 catch up contribution annual limit applicable to such plans to $9,000.

See what he’s done here to Americans trying to save for retirement? At age 50 plus, we will pay on average – say 30 percent – for each catchup retirement dollar. How many years does it take to catchup with this 30 percent loss out the door? Based on historical annual average market returns, it will require four years to break even on the 30 percent loss. Only in year five will the 50-year-old, based on historical returns, start to earn towards retirement relative to her situation today in 2017. Where does our 30 percent loss out the door go? To pay for …. an energy credit? I don’t know. The revenue raised is relatively minuscule. The damage to retirement savings – tremendous.

Lack of Impact Analysis on Retirement and Public Employees

Curiously, I have not found many informative articles about the impact to retirement from these above-mentioned changes. Why is it silence from the public university crowd that is usually quite loud although this provision will damage their ability to attract researchers, faculty, and staff from the higher compensation opportunities of private educational institutions and for-profit industry?  Are we embarrassed to appear to be lobbying to keep a tax break? Just caught by surprise?  At least the NAGDCA has sent out an alert (Government Defined Contribution Administrators) to its members.

Instead of the beneficial retirement system, government agencies and public institutions need to find more revenue to pay competitive salaries and employee benefits to replace the loss of the retirement benefits (doubtful) Senate Finance will take away. Lacking better salaries, government agencies and public institutions will experience disproportionate employee turnover of the best performing management coupled with a declining ability to attract highly accomplished professionals and researchers to replace the pool.

Is this Payback Against the IRS?

Perhaps this provision is a Republican payback to government agencies like the IRS because Republicans think that the current government management pool is biased against Republican groups or lacks service for taxpayers? But taking out the best performing managers from government service will exasperate the challenges, not remediate them. If this is a ‘payback’, then it is “cutting off one’s nose”.  Perhaps the provision is but a Machiavellian move in a contest for talent between a state university and its private counterpart (Utah v BYU comes to mind)?

Maybe the silence from the government and public institutions employees is ‘heads in the sand’, and perhaps ‘those in the know’ think this provision will not survive because JCT scored it as only worth $100 million a year at least until 2021 (so why waste the political capital). Apportioned amongst all government employees in the US (being federal and state), state public academic institutions I suspect are less than 10 percent of this score, thus about $10 million a year for offset (inconsequential basically).

Can Public Institutions Be Saved?

A carve-out from this provision for public educational institutions would address the harmful issue and can be negotiated in response to the also proposed loss of the current carve-out for deferrals allowed for section 403(b) plan for at least 15 years of service to an educational organization, hospital, home health service agency, health and welfare service agency, and church. Seems to me that Republicans would prefer to incentivize via retirement doctors, nurses, social workers, and clergy to stay long-term in their public positions instead of paying higher government salaries.

Interested to learn the impact on your clients of the 2018 tax changes, and what to do about it?  Read the online version of Tax Facts.

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10 most tax-friendly states for retirees

Posted by William Byrnes on March 23, 2015


NU logoEvery client’s goals are different when it comes to choosing where to retire, but from a tax perspective, there are some clear winners that can allow a client to maximize the value of accumulated retirement savings.

While the client’s lifestyle choices — a desire for an expensive home vs. spending on consumer products, for example — greatly impact the tax system that will provide the most substantial benefits, below is a list of ten of the top states for retirees, from a tax perspective. read the analysis of Prof. William Byrnes and Robert Bloink in National Underwriter Life Health Pro

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Fixed Annuity Sales Rising in 2014, but Why ?

Posted by William Byrnes on September 10, 2014


International Financial Law Prof Blog – New studies show that, despite relatively stable conditions, fixed annuity sales have increased considerably in 2014 over 2013, as a perhaps unexpected number of clients flock toward these traditional guaranteed income products. 

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Teaching an old dog a new trick: the modified endowment contract (MEC) and the modern portfolio

Posted by William Byrnes on June 6, 2014


The MEC 

A MEC is essentially a type of cash value life insurance policy that is subject to less favorable tax rules because it has been funded with premiums during the first seven years of the policy’s existence that exceed certain maximum amounts (depending on the policy’s benefit level and cost).  Despite this, the MEC’s worth today can remain substantial.

In some cases, dismissing the MEC too quickly can cause your clients to miss out on a valuable product.  For clients with sufficient means, the opportunity to rapidly fund a life insurance contract so as to become subject to the rules governing MECs may actually provide a powerful strategy in the well-rounded planner’s arsenal.

read this analysis in the article “The MEC and the Modern Portfolio

 

If you are interested in discussing the Master or Doctoral degree in the areas of financial planning, please contact me: profbyrnes@gmail.com to Google Hangout or Skype that I may take you on an “online tour” 

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More than 40% of big firm partners retiring over coming decade – and many will outlive retirement savings!

Posted by William Byrnes on May 5, 2014


On April 28, 2014 The American Lawyer published its annual (2014) Big Law report in which it found that 16% of partners in the US’ largest 200 law firms by revenue are 60 years old or older with at least 8% least 65.  This generally means that these partners will be retiring over the next five years.  Moreover, right behind this retiring group are 28% more of the partners that have reached at least 50 years of age.

While these thousands of retiring partners have in general been earning between $1 million and $3 million annually, most also have lifestyles that correspond to spending this level of income.  These retiring partners are now asking “Will my retirement portfolio maintain my spouse and my lifestyles if we live another 30 years?”  “Will we have enough to truly enjoy our retirement, or will we have to cut back our lifestyle to make due?”  Will plans for luxurious global travel and spas be thrown out the window?  Wealth managers and financial planners have turned attention to these retirees.

“The 10,000 baby boomer that reach retirement age each day in America are waking up to the probability that they will outspend their retirement plan designed before the financial crisis, forcing a drastic reduction in quality of life style for the ‘golden years’” shared William Byrnes, author of National Underwriter’s Tax Facts.

“The largest concern for most middle class Americans is that social security since Ronald Reagan’s presidency did not increase enough to beat actual inflation.  The average social security monthly payment in 2014 is only $1,294 for a single retiree, and $2,111 for a married couple.  And it is possible that Congress will further reduce inflation adjustments for the future.”

“Moreover, baby boomers are outliving their retirement plans by at least ten years, and thus selling off their remaining assets and relying on children”, continued Professor Byrnes. “It’s no wonder that reverse mortgages have become so popular.”

“It’s not just the middle class retirees trying to survive on $2,500 a month over at least the next 20 years as lifestyle becomes more expensive, upper middle class Americans and even the wealthy also have lifestyle challenges.  A couple who for the past twenty years is used to spending $200,000 a year after tax needs to have significant assets.”

“Let’s run an example using a National Underwriter Advanced Markets retirement calculator.  A 50 year old partner at a law firm that requires retirement by age 67 currently earns after tax $300,000.  The partner will begin saving $60,000 a year toward retirement, and already has $400,000 saved and earned in tax deferred retirement accounts.  The partner expects earnings to increase 1.5% on average per year.  The partner expects to live until 90 years old, and will cut the annual lifestyle by 30% to $210,00 a year upon retirement.  The partner expects a healthy annual rate of return on the investments until reaching 90 of 5%, and average annual inflation of only 2%.”

“The question is: Will the partner’s retirement dollars last  until age 90? Unfortunately, the partner has only 13 years of retirement based on this scenario, and that only if including $42,937 of average annual social security.  At age 80, the $2,439,817 of retirement savings simply runs out. So given these variables, the partner must either save significantly more for retirement, have assets that can be sold down during retirement (such as the family home), or live on only $150,000 a year.  While $150,000 a year sounds like a lot to middle class retirees, for law firm partners living in New York, Miami, DC, LA, San Fran who are used to an upper class lifestyle, living on half the income with double the free time is a shock. And remember, this includes social security paying out over $40,000 of that $150,000 a year.”

“Stretching the retirement savings available for these additional ten years of life expectancy in the example above requires correctly calibrating a retirement plan over the next 20 years which includes managing the complex retirement savings and retirement plans tax rules.”

Robert Bloink added, “Baby boomers retirement taxation questions include: How are earnings on an IRA taxed? What is the penalty for making excessive contributions to an IRA? How are amounts distributed from a traditional and from a ROTH IRA taxed?  How is the required minimum distribution (RMD) calculated?”

“By example of managing the retirement taxation rules, if the baby boomer engages in a prohibited transaction with his IRA, his or her individual retirement account may cease to qualify for the tax benefits.  Thus, then baby boomer needs to understand what is a prohibited transaction?  When can the baby boomer tax pull retirement funds as a loan from a retirement account or policy without it being prohibited?”

“For complex modern families with multiple marriages and various children, a retirement and estate planner should analyze the non-probate assets”, interjected Dr. George Mentz. “Such assets may include the client’s 401k, 403b, 459, annuities, property and joint tenancy, among others.  Regarding insurance policy designations, the client may need to reexamine the beneficiaries, contingent and secondary, and percentages among them, based on current circumstances.”

“Because client’s are outliving their life expectancy and thus outliving their retirement planning, and medical expenses certainly factor into retirement planning, long term care for family members must also be addressed,” said William Byrnes.  “Moreover, recent press has focused client’s attention on tragic incident and end of life issues, such as a durable power of attorney for health care (DPA/HC), living will, or advance directives that explain the patient’s wishes in certain medical situations.  Finally in this regard, a client may require a Limited Powers of Attorney to address situations of incapacity, as well as orderly continuation of immediate family needs upon death.“

Robert Bloink included, “Other important issues to address with the client include pre-marital property contracts/pre-nuptials involving the second marriage(s), IRA beneficiary planning in blended families, spousal lifetime access trust (SLATs), and planning for unmarried domestic partners.”

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Robert Bloink, Esq., LL.M., and William H. Byrnes, Esq., LL.M., CWM®—are delivering real-life guidance based on decades of experience.” said Rick Kravitz.  The authors’ knowledge and experience in tax law and practice provides the expert guidance for National Underwriter to once again deliver a valuable resource for the financial advising community.

Anyone interested can try Tax Facts on Individuals & Small Business, risk-free for 30 days, with a 100% guarantee of complete satisfaction.  For more information, please go to www.nationalunderwriter.com/TaxFactsIndividuals or call 1-800-543-0874.

 Authoritative and easy-to-use, 2014 Tax Facts on Insurance & Employee Benefits shows you how the tax law and regulations are relevant to your insurance, employee benefits, and financial planning practices.  Often complex tax law and regulations are explained in clear, understandable language.  Pertinent planning points are provided throughout.

2014 Tax Facts on Investments provides clear, concise answers to often complex tax questions concerning investments.  2014 expanded sections on Limitations on Loss Deductions, Charitable Gifts, Reverse Mortgages, and REITs.

 

 

If you are interested in discussing the Master or Doctorate degree in the areas of financial services or taxation, please contact me https://profwilliambyrnes.com/online-tax-degree/

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5 Tax Facts for Early Retirement Plan Withdrawals

Posted by William Byrnes on April 28, 2014


In Tax Tip 2014-35, the IRS addressed the issue of potential tax penalties for withdrawing money before retirement age from a retirement account.

5 tax tips about early withdrawals from retirement plans:

1. An early withdrawal normally means taking money from a retirement plan before age 59½.

2. If a taxpayer makes a withdrawal from a plan, that withdrawal amount must be reported to the IRS on the annual tax return.  Income tax may be due as well as an additional 10 percent tax on the amount of the early withdrawal.  The taxpayer may need to file Form 5329, “Additional Taxes on Qualified Plans (Including IRAs) and Other Tax-Favored Accounts”, with the annual federal tax return.

3. The additional 10 percent tax does not apply to nontaxable withdrawals.  Nontaxable withdrawals include withdrawals of the cost to participate in the retirement plan.  The cost includes the taxpayer’s after-tax contributions before the contributions are contributed to the plan.

4. A “rollover” is a type of nontaxable withdrawal. Generally, a rollover is a distribution to the taxpayer of cash or other assets from one retirement plan that is then immediately contributed to another retirement plan.  The taxpayer has 60 days to complete the rollover to make it tax-free.

5. There are many exceptions to the additional 10 percent tax. Some of the exceptions for retirement plans are different from the rules for IRAs.

Exceptions to Tax on Early Distributions

Generally, the amounts an individual withdraws from an IRA or retirement plan before reaching age 59½ are called ”early” or ”premature” distributions. Individuals must pay an additional 10% early withdrawal tax and report the amount to the IRS for any early distributions, unless an exception applies.

The distribution will NOT be subject to the 10% additional early distribution tax in the following circumstances: Exception to 10% Additional Tax
Qualified Plans
(401(k), etc.)
IRA, SEP, SIMPLE IRA* and SARSEP Plans Internal Revenue Code Section(s)
Age
after participant/IRA owner reaches age 59½ yes yes 72(t)(2)(A)(i)
Automatic Enrollment
permissive withdrawals from a plan with auto enrollment features yes yes for SIMPLE IRAs and SARSEPs 414(w)(1)(B)
Corrective Distributions
corrective distributions (and associated earnings) of excess contributions, excess aggregate contributions and excess deferrals, made timely yes n/a 401(k)(8)(D),
401(m)(7)(A),
402(g)(2)(C)
Death
after death of the participant/IRA owner yes yes 72(t)(2)(A)(ii)
Disability
total and permanent disability of the participant/IRA owner yes yes 72(t)(2)(A)(iii)
Domestic Relations
to an alternate payee under a Qualified Domestic Relations Order yes n/a 72(t)(2)(C)
Education
qualified higher education expenses no yes 72(t)(2)(E)
Equal Payments
series of substantially equal payments yes yes 72(t)(2)(A)(iv)
ESOP
dividend pass through from an ESOP yes n/a 72(t)(2)(A)(vi)
Homebuyers
qualified first-time homebuyers, up to $10,000 no yes 72(t)(2)(F)
Levy
because of an IRS levy of the plan yes yes 72(t)(2)(A)(vii)
Medical
amount of unreimbursed medical expenses (>7.5% AGI; after 2012, 10% if under age 65) yes yes 72(t)(2)(B)
health insurance premiums paid while unemployed no yes 72(t)(2)(D)
Military
certain distributions to qualified military reservists called to active duty yes yes 72(t)(2)(G)
Returned IRA Contributions
if withdrawn by extended due date of return n/a yes 408(d)(4)
earnings on these returned contributions n/a no 408(d)(4)
Rollovers
in-plan Roth rollovers or eligible distributions contributed to another retirement plan or IRA within 60 days yes yes 402(c), 402A(d)(3), 403(a)(4), 403(b)(8), 408(d)(3), 408A(d)(3)
Separation from Service
the employee separates from service during or after the year the employee reaches age 55 (age 50 for public safety employees in a governmental defined benefit plan) yes no 72(t)(2)(A)(v),
72(t)(10)

NOTE: Governmental 457(b) distributions are not subject to the 10% additional tax except for distributions attributable to rollovers from another type of plan or IRA.

*25% instead of 10% if made within the first 2 years of participation

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Authoritative and easy-to-use, 2014 Tax Facts on Insurance & Employee Benefits shows you how the tax law and regulations are relevant to your insurance, employee benefits, and financial planning practices.  Often complex tax law and regulations are explained in clear, understandable language.  Pertinent planning points are provided throughout.  Due to a number of recent changes in the law, taxpayers are currently facing many questions connected to important issues such as healthcare, home office use, capital gains, investments, and whether an individual is considered an employee or a contractor. Financial advisors are continually looking for updated tax information that can help them provide the right answers to the right people at the right time. This brand-new resource provides fast, clear, and authoritative answers to pressing questions, and it does so in the convenient, timesaving, Q&A format for which Tax Facts is famous.

“Our brand-new Tax Facts title is exciting in many ways,” says Rick Kravitz, Vice President & Managing Director of Summit Professional Network’s Professional Publishing Division. “First of all, it fills a huge gap in the resources available to today’s advisors. Small business is a big market, and this book enables advisors to get up-and-running right away, with proven guidance that will help them serve their clients’ needs. Secondly, it addresses the biggest questions facing all taxpayers and provides absolutely reliable answers that help advisors solve today’s biggest problems with confidence.”

Robert Bloink, Esq., LL.M., and William H. Byrnes, Esq., LL.M., CWM®—are delivering real-life guidance based on decades of experience.  The authors’ knowledge and experience in tax law and practice provides the expert guidance for National Underwriter to once again deliver a valuable resource for the financial advising community,” added Rick Kravitz.

Anyone interested can try Tax Facts on Individuals & Small Business, risk-free for 30 days, with a 100% guarantee of complete satisfaction.  For more information, please go to www.nationalunderwriter.com/TaxFactsIndividuals or call 1-800-543-0874.

 

Posted in Retirement Planning | Tagged: , , , | 1 Comment »

Transition into retirement seamlessly with combo DIA-variable annuity

Posted by William Byrnes on April 2, 2014


While deferred income annuities have gained a prominent position in the retirement income planning game, the newest entrant into the annuity marketplace is poised to change the way these products operate for good. This is because the new deferred income annuity comes wrapped up within a variable annuity product, allowing clients to access the best of both worlds though a single annuity contract.

By structuring the deferred income annuity as a rider, rather than as a stand-alone contract, insurance carriers can now provide clients with the ability to participate in market gains while ensuring sufficient income even late into retirement, without the need to purchase, manage, or exchange multiple annuity contracts.

Read the analysis of William Byrnes and Robert Bloink at > LifeHealthPro <

LifeHealthPro.com is the vital online destination for life & health insurance advisors, designed to provide them with the essential elements they need to run their practice and increase their bottom line including breaking news, market trends, practice tips and more.

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Tomorrow’s Deadline (April 1) for Many Retirees To Take Required Retirement Plan Distributions

Posted by William Byrnes on March 31, 2014


The Internal Revenue Service in Tax Tip 2014-38 reminded taxpayers who turned 70½ during 2013 that in most cases they must start receiving required minimum distributions (RMDs) from Individual Retirement Accounts (IRAs) and workplace retirement plans by Tuesday, April 1, 2014.

The April 1 deadline applies to owners of traditional IRAs but not Roth IRAs. Normally, it also applies to participants in various workplace retirement plans, including 401(k), 403(b) and 457 plans.

The April 1 deadline only applies to the required distribution for the first year. For all subsequent years, the RMD must be made by Dec. 31. So, for example, a taxpayer who turned 70½ in 2013 and receives the first required payment on April 1, 2014 must still receive the second RMD by Dec. 31, 2014.

Affected taxpayers who turned 70½ during 2013 must figure the RMD for the first year using their life expectancy on Dec. 31, 2013 and their account balance on Dec. 31, 2012. The trustee reports the year-end account value to the IRA owner on Form 5498 in Box 5. Worksheets and life expectancy tables for making this computation can be found in the Appendices to Publication 590.

Most taxpayers use Table III (Uniform Lifetime) to figure their RMD. For a taxpayer who turned 71 in 2013, for example, the first required distribution would be based on a life expectancy of 26.5 years. A separate table, Table II, applies to a taxpayer married to a spouse who is more than 10 years younger and is the taxpayer’s only beneficiary.

Though the April 1 deadline is mandatory for all owners of traditional IRAs and most participants in workplace retirement plans, some people with workplace plans can wait longer to receive their RMD. Usually, employees who are still working can, if their plan allows, wait until April 1 of the year after they retire to start receiving these distributions. See Tax on Excess Accumulations in Publication 575. Employees of public schools and certain tax-exempt organizations with 403(b) plan accruals before 1987 should check with their employer, plan administrator or provider to see how to treat these accruals.

The IRS encourages taxpayers to begin planning now for any distributions required during 2014. An IRA trustee must either report the amount of the RMD to the IRA owner or offer to calculate it for the owner. Often, the trustee shows the RMD amount in Box 12b on Form 5498. For a 2014 RMD, this amount would be on the 2013 Form 5498 that is normally issued in January 2014.

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Client’s Seeking Market Value Adjusted Annuities

Posted by William Byrnes on March 16, 2014


As clients have begun to feel the shifting winds with respect to the general economy, the annuity market is now undergoing its own type of evolution. While products that tie fluctuations in an annuity’s cash surrender value to prevailing market interest rates may have seemed unacceptably risky to most clients just a few months ago, changes in today’s interest rate environment now have clients flocking to find these features.

Annuities with market value adjustment (MVA) features may be the next hot product for clients looking to beat the return on other conservative investment products, so make sure you are ready for this emerging product trend.

Read the full analysis of Professor William Byrnes and Robert Bloink at Think Advisor !

2013_tf_insurance_emp_benefits_combo_covers-m_2Authoritative and easy-to-use, 2014 Tax Facts on Insurance & Employee Benefits shows you how the tax law and regulations are relevant to your insurance, employee benefits, and financial planning practices.  Often complex tax law and regulations are explained in clear, understandable language.  Pertinent planning points are provided throughout.

Organized in a convenient Q&A format to speed you to the information you need, 2014 Tax Facts on Insurance & Employee Benefits delivers the latest guidance on:

  • Estate & Gift Tax Planning
  • Roth IRAs
  • HSAs
  • Capital Gains, Qualifying Dividends
  • Non-qualified Deferred Compensation Under IRC Section 409A
  • And much more!

Key updates for 2014:

  • Important federal income and estate tax developments impacting insurance and employee benefits including changes from the American Taxpayer Relief Act of 2012
  • Concise updated explanation and highlights of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (PPACA)
  • Expanded coverage of Annuities
  • New section on Structured Settlements
  • New section on International Tax
  • More than thirty new Planning Points, written by practitioners for practitioners, in the following areas:
    • Life Insurance
    • Health Insurance
    • Estate and Gift Tax
    • Deferred Compensation
    • Individual Retirement Plans

Plus, you’re kept up-to-date with online supplements for critical developments.  Written and reviewed by practicing professionals who are subject matter experts in their respective topics, Tax Facts is the practical resource you can rely on.

Posted in Insurance, Pensions, Retirement Planning | Tagged: , , , , | Leave a Comment »

How a Counterintuitive Social Security Strategy Can Fund an Early Retirement

Posted by William Byrnes on February 17, 2014


Astute financial producers recognize that some of the most successful planning strategies are those customized to meet the individual client’s needs, and, in some cases, this means defying conventional wisdom and focusing on the numbers at hand.  Effective Social Security planning is no different.

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While it may seem obvious to some advisors that clients should be counseled to delay collecting Social Security in order to maximize benefit levels, in reality this may not be the most effective strategy for many clients.  By going against the grain and claiming benefits early, this counterintuitive Social Security strategy can actually help clients make the most of their traditional retirement savings accounts.

Read the full analysis of Professor William Byrnes and Robert Bloink at Think Advisor !

ThinkAdvisor.com supports the professional growth and vitality of the Investment Advisory community, from RIAs and wealth managers of all kinds, to independent broker-dealer and wirehouse representatives. We provide unparalleled access to the knowledge, information and critical resources they need to succeed at every stage in their career, including professional development, education and certification, industry news and analysis, reference tools and services, and community networking opportunities.

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ESOPs: A Tax-Advantaged Business Succession Plan

Posted by William Byrnes on February 12, 2014


Employee stock ownership plans (ESOPs) can serve a number of purposes for your small business clients, providing a powerful motivator for employees and simultaneously reducing corporate taxes. In today’s market, however, the most important function of an ESOP may actually solve one of your retiring small business client’s most pressing problems—how to exit the business upon retirement.

This business succession strategy can actually allow a small business client to gradually transition into retirement through a sale of the business to his employees while deferring recognition of any gain on the sale far into the future.

Read the full analysis of Professor William Byrnes and Robert Bloink at Think Advisor !

 

2013_tf_insurance_emp_benefits_combo_covers-m_2Authoritative and easy-to-use, 2014 Tax Facts on Insurance & Employee Benefits shows you how the tax law and regulations are relevant to your insurance, employee benefits, and financial planning practices.  Often complex tax law and regulations are explained in clear, understandable language.  Pertinent planning points are provided throughout.

Organized in a convenient Q&A format to speed you to the information you need, 2014 Tax Facts on Insurance & Employee Benefits delivers the latest guidance on:

 

  • Estate & Gift Tax Planning
  • Roth IRAs
  • HSAs
  • Capital Gains, Qualifying Dividends
  • Non-qualified Deferred Compensation Under IRC Section 409A
  • And much more!

Key updates for 2014:

  • Important federal income and estate tax developments impacting insurance and employee benefits including changes from the American Taxpayer Relief Act of 2012
  • Concise updated explanation and highlights of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (PPACA)
  • Expanded coverage of Annuities
  • New section on Structured Settlements
  • New section on International Tax
  • More than thirty new Planning Points, written by practitioners for practitioners, in the following areas:
    • Life Insurance
    • Health Insurance
    • Estate and Gift Tax
    • Deferred Compensation
    • Individual Retirement Plans

Plus, you’re kept up-to-date with online supplements for critical developments.  Written and reviewed by practicing professionals who are subject matter experts in their respective topics, Tax Facts is the practical resource you can rely on.

Posted in Insurance, Pensions | Tagged: , , | 1 Comment »

Can Your Business Help its Employees Save in 2014 Via an Automatic Payroll Deduction IRA?

Posted by William Byrnes on February 3, 2014


This artticle discusses one avenue for retirement planning solutions for small businesses. Financial Planners who have small business clients may consider a discussion on the automatic payroll deduction IRAs as one simple way to help employees save for retirement.

A payroll deduction individual retirement account (IRA) is one simple way for businesses to give employees an opportunity to save for retirement. The program is easy to implement; the employer sets up the payroll deduction IRA program with a bank, insurance company or other financial institution, and then the employees choose whether and how much they want deducted from their paychecks and deposited into the IRA. Depending on the IRA service provider, some employees may also have a choice of investments depending on the IRA provider. Wealth managers can add value to employees and employers by, not only establishing a plan, but by also working with employees to help them manage their IRAs.

Under a payroll deduction IRA, the employee makes all of the contributions, thus there are no employer contributions. By making regular payroll deductions, employees are able to contribute smaller amounts each pay period to their IRAs, rather than having to come up with a larger amount all at once.

One advantage of these accounts is that there is little administrative cost and no annual filings with the government. Moreover, businesses of any size can participate as there is no requirement that an employer have a certain number of employees to set up a payroll deduction IRA.

Another element that makes the program attractive to some small businesses is that the program will not be considered an employer retirement plan subject to Federal requirements for reporting and fiduciary responsibilities as long as the employer keeps its involvement to a minimum.

Here’s how the IRAs generally work: The employer sets up the payroll deduction IRA program with a financial institution, such as a bank, mutual fund or insurance company. The employee establishes either a traditional or a Roth IRA (based on the employee’s eligibility and personal choice) with the financial institution and authorizes the payroll deductions. The employer withholds the payroll deduction amounts that the employee has authorized and promptly transmits the funds to the financial institution. After doing so, the employee and the financial institution are responsible for the amounts contributed.

Generally however, the employer needs to remain neutral with respect to the IRA provider. It cannot negotiate with an IRA provider to obtain special terms for its employees, exercise any influence over the investments made or permitted by the IRA provider, or receive any compensation in connection with the IRA program except reimbursement for the actual cost of forwarding the payroll deductions.

Commonly, any employee who performs services for the business (or “employer”) can be eligible to participate. The decision to participate is left exclusively up to the employee. The employees should understand that they have the same opportunity to contribute to an IRA outside the payroll deduction program and that the employer is not providing any additional benefit to employees who participate.

Employees’ tax-deferred contributions are generally limited to a maximum annual calendar year contribution, for 2014 that maximum is $5,500.00. Additional “catch-up” contributions of currently $1,000.00 a year are permitted for employees age 50 or over, thus a total of $6,500.00 a year for 2014.

Example of time value of money

Saving $500.00 per month, for 20 years, at 6% annual return over that time will provide you $232,176.00 for retirement.  See the US government’s Tools and Calculators for Investors

The new Presidential myRA to be established by Treasury in 2014

The new myRA, to be established by Treasury under request of President Obama, is covered previously in this blog at > myRA <  Several blog subscribers have emailed me with policy and operational questions about the “myRA“.   A vein of questions that I find particularly interesting is whether tax policy rests with the executive instead of Congress?  The myRA has a tax benefit (tax exemption during the earnings period) and a cost (no fees to be passed onto the employee, but as the adage goes: “there is no free lunch”).  Tax Policy (tax imposition and tax benefit) should be established by Congress as part of the democratic process of establishing a fiscal budget.   Yet, this norm is not absolute because Congress handed over of both establishing and enforcing regulation to the Executive (Treasury in this case).  Establishing and enforcing the regulations also impacts policy.  If you care to comment directly in the blog, do so below or feel free to continue sending me your comments directly. 

2013_tf_insurance_emp_benefits_combo_covers-m_2Authoritative and easy-to-use, 2014 Tax Facts on Insurance & Employee Benefits shows you how the tax law and regulations are relevant to your insurance, employee benefits, and financial planning practices.  Often complex tax law and regulations are explained in clear, understandable language.  Pertinent planning points are provided throughout.

Organized in a convenient Q&A format to speed you to the information you need, 2014 Tax Facts on Insurance & Employee Benefits delivers the latest guidance on:

  • Estate & Gift Tax Planning
  • Roth IRAs
  • HSAs
  • Capital Gains, Qualifying Dividends
  • Non-qualified Deferred Compensation Under IRC Section 409A
  • And much more!

Key updates for 2014:

  • Important federal income and estate tax developments impacting insurance and employee benefits including changes from the American Taxpayer Relief Act of 2012
  • Concise updated explanation and highlights of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (PPACA)
  • Expanded coverage of Annuities
  • New section on Structured Settlements
  • New section on International Tax
  • More than thirty new Planning Points, written by practitioners for practitioners, in the following areas:
    • Life Insurance
    • Health Insurance
    • Estate and Gift Tax
    • Deferred Compensation
    • Individual Retirement Plans

Plus, you’re kept up-to-date with online supplements for critical developments.  Written and reviewed by practicing professionals who are subject matter experts in their respective topics, Tax Facts is the practical resource you can rely on.

Posted in Retirement Planning, Wealth Management | Tagged: , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Opportunity for All: Securing a Dignified Retirement for All Americans (the “myRA”)

Posted by William Byrnes on January 29, 2014


Since many persons have asked me for the link, I copy the new myRA information from the President’s announcement below.  Creating the “myRA” – a Simple, Safe, and Affordable Starter Savings Account to Help Millions of Americans Start Saving for Retirement….

In the State of the Union, the President announced that he will use his executive authority to direct the Department of the Treasury to create “myRA” – a new simple, safe and affordable “starter” retirement savings account that will be offered through employers and will ultimately help millions of Americans begin to save for retirement.

  • Starter Savings Account: Making It Easier to Start Saving for Retirement. This new product will be targeted to the many Americans who currently lack access to workplace retirement savings plans, which is usually the most effective way to save for retirement. Starting to save is just the first step towards a secure retirement, and the President wants to help more Americans save for their future.
  • Safe and Secure: Principal Protection So Savers’ Account Balance Will Never Go Down. The product will be offered via a familiar Roth IRA account, and savers will benefit from principal protection, so the account balance will never go down in value. The security in the account, like all savings bonds, will be backed by the U.S. government. Contributions can be withdrawn tax free at any time.
  • User-Friendly for Savers: Portable Account with Contributions that Are Voluntary, Automatic, and Small. Initial investments could be as low as $25 and contributions that are as low as $5 could be made through easy-to-use payroll deductions.  Savers have the option of keeping the same account when they change jobs and can roll the balance into a private-sector retirement account at any time.
  • Favorable Investment Return: Same Secure Investment Return Available to Federal Employees. Savers will earn interest at the same variable interest rate as the federal employees’ Thrift Savings Plan (TSP) Government Securities Investment Fund.
  • Widely Available: Available to Millions of Middle Class Americans Through Their Employer. This saving opportunity would be available to the millions of low- and middle-income households earning up to $191,000 a year.  These accounts will be offered through an initial pilot program to employees of employers who choose to participate by the end of 2014.  The accounts are little to no cost and easy for employers to use, since employers will neither administer the accounts nor contribute to them.   Participants could save up to $15,000, or for a maximum of 30 years, in their accounts before transferring their balance to a private sector Roth IRA.

The President remains committed to working with Congress to help secure a dignified retirement for all Americans. While Social Security is and must remain a rock-solid, guaranteed progressive benefit that every American can rely on, the most secure retirement requires a three-legged stool that includes savings and pensions. That’s why the President is using his executive authority to create the “myRA” and has already proposed to work with Congress on the following proposals to help Americans save for their retirement:

  • Giving Every Employee Access to Easy, Payroll-Based Savings Through the Auto-IRA. About half of all American workers do not have access to employer-sponsored retirement plans like 401(k)s, which puts the onus on individuals to set up and invest in an Individual Retirement Account (IRA). Up to 9 out of 10 workers automatically enrolled in a 401(k) plan through their employer make contributions, even years later, while fewer than 1 out of 10 workers eligible to contribute to an IRA voluntarily do so. The President’s budget will propose to establish automatic enrollment in IRAs (or “auto-IRAs”) for employees without access to a workplace savings plan, in keeping with a plan that he has proposed in every budget since he took office. Employers that do not provide any employer-sponsored savings plan would be required to connect their employees with a payroll deduction IRA.  This proposal could provide access to one-quarter of all workers, according to a recent study.

—–  Making Sure the Auto-IRA Works for Workers and Small Businesses. Workers would not be required to contribute and are free to opt out. Employers would also not contribute. The plan would also help defray the minimal administrative costs of establishing auto-IRAs for small businesses, including through tax incentives.

  • Removing Inefficient Retirement Tax Breaks for the Wealthiest While Improving Them for the Middle Class.  The Auto-IRA will spread the tax benefits for retirement savings to millions more middle-class Americans.  Current retirement tax subsidies disproportionately benefit higher-income households, many of whom would have saved with or without incentives. An estimated two-thirds of tax benefits for retirement saving go to the top 20% of earners, with one-third going to the top 5 percent of earners. Our tax incentives for retirement can be designed more efficiently.   According to one 2012 study, additional tax expenditures are a comparatively inefficient way to generate additional saving. The President has proposed to limit the benefits of tax breaks, including retirement tax preferences, for high income households to a maximum of 28 percent.  The President has also proposed to limit contributions to tax-preferred savings accounts once balances are about $3.2 million, large enough to fund a reasonable pension in retirement.

Importance of Securing a Dignified Retirement for All Americans *

  • Many Americans lack access to workplace retirement savings plans – usually the most effective and generous means of saving for retirement.  About half of all workers and 75 percent of part-time workers lack access to employer-sponsored retirement plans.
  • The financial crisis dealt a severe blow to the retirement outlook for many families, wiping out more than $12 trillion dollars in household wealth. While financial markets have returned to their pre-crisis levels, median household wealth has only recovered 45 percent of the losses during the recession.
  • The risk of an insecure retirement is especially great for women, minorities, and low-income Americans. Women continue to be less prepared for retirement than men and comprise 63 percent of the elderly living below the poverty line. White households have six times the wealth, including retirement savings, of African Americans or Hispanics. And low-wage and part-time workers are just one-third as likely as high-wage and full-time workers to participate in an employer-based retirement plan.

 

2013_tf_insurance_emp_benefits_combo_covers-m_2Authoritative and easy-to-use, 2014 Tax Facts on Insurance & Employee Benefits shows you how the tax law and regulations are relevant to your insurance, employee benefits, and financial planning practices.  Often complex tax law and regulations are explained in clear, understandable language.  Pertinent planning points are provided throughout.

Organized in a convenient Q&A format to speed you to the information you need, 2014 Tax Facts on Insurance & Employee Benefits delivers the latest guidance on:

  • Estate & Gift Tax Planning
  • Roth IRAs
  • HSAs
  • Capital Gains, Qualifying Dividends
  • Non-qualified Deferred Compensation Under IRC Section 409A
  • And much more!

Key updates for 2014:

  • Important federal income and estate tax developments impacting insurance and employee benefits including changes from the American Taxpayer Relief Act of 2012
  • Concise updated explanation and highlights of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (PPACA)
  • Expanded coverage of Annuities
  • New section on Structured Settlements
  • New section on International Tax
  • More than thirty new Planning Points, written by practitioners for practitioners, in the following areas:
    • Life Insurance
    • Health Insurance
    • Estate and Gift Tax
    • Deferred Compensation
    • Individual Retirement Plans

Plus, you’re kept up-to-date with online supplements for critical developments.  Written and reviewed by practicing professionals who are subject matter experts in their respective topics, Tax Facts is the practical resource you can rely on.

Posted in Retirement Planning | Tagged: , , , | 2 Comments »

How to Build Your Own Solution to Long-Term Care Insurance Scarcity

Posted by William Byrnes on September 10, 2013


A basic problem for clients looking for long-term care insurance today is that they simply may not be able to find it. Major carriers have pulled out of the market in the last year, and the policies that remain can be prohibitively expensive and contain strict qualification requirements.

Fortunately, the product market is evolving so that a relatively new method of securing tax-preferred long-term care benefits has emerged. Hybrid annuity products that combine the estate and income planning features of an annuity with the protection of long-term care insurance are becoming increasingly popular among clients looking for replacement insurance.

Read William Byrnes’ analysis of building your own solution to long-term care insurance at > The Law Professor Column of Think Advisor <

 

Posted in Insurance, Retirement Planning | Tagged: , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Post-Retirement Health Care: A Quarter-Million-Dollar Dilemma

Posted by William Byrnes on December 3, 2012


After expenses covered by Medicare are taken into account, many of your clients retiring this year are likely to incur about $240,000 per couple in out-of-pocket health care expenses during retirement. …  You may be able to alleviate the retiree health-expense problem by using guaranteed income annuities or life insurance alternative funding solutions.

Posted in Insurance, Pensions, Retirement Planning, Wealth Management | Tagged: , , | Leave a Comment »

When Clients Get Lump-Sum Pension Offers, What to Advise?

Posted by William Byrnes on November 30, 2012


An increasing number of your clients are facing the novel possibility of choosing a lump sum payout from their pensions instead of the traditional annuity option.  See the full article at –http://www.lifehealthpro.com/2012/08/16/when-clients-get-lump-sum-pension-offers-what-to-a

Posted in Insurance, Pensions, Taxation, Wealth Management | Tagged: , , , | Leave a Comment »

Life Settlements — Are They Back?

Posted by William Byrnes on November 28, 2012


One question financial advisors are asking themselves today is whether life settlements have returned to the fold as a viable tool in their clients’ planning strategies.  Read the entire article at http://www.lifehealthpro.com/2012/09/05/life-settlements-are-they-back

Posted in Insurance, Retirement Planning, Taxation, Wealth Management | Tagged: , , | Leave a Comment »

The Psychology of Saving: If We’re Living Longer, Why Are We Saving Less?

Posted by William Byrnes on November 29, 2011


In addition to confirming earlier beliefs, a new academic study about the effects of increase life-spans on savings rates has inspired new intrigue.

The conclusions reached by Optimal Retirement and Saving with Increasing Longevity, by David E. Bloom, David Canning, and Michael Moore are simple enough but need some further discussion: “[A] higher level of wages leads to earlier retirement and increasing savings rates. On the other hand an increase in life expectancy leads to an increase [in] the retirement age, but less than proportionately, while reducing savings rates.”

Consequently, the importance of planning for middle-income families increases. Without a solid plan, many are left working many more years than they hoped or planned.

Read this complete analysis of the impact at AdvisorFX (sign up for a free trial subscription with full access to all the planning libraries and client presentations if you are not already a subscriber).

For previous coverage of retirement values in Advisor’s Journal, see Appealing to Your Affluent Clients’ Retirement Planning Values (CC-11-42).

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Do Your Clients’ International Assets Create Criminal Tax Exposure?

Posted by William Byrnes on August 12, 2011


Retirement plan sponsors face increasing regulatory scrutiny and significant liability as plan fiduciaries. Can you leverage off these fiduciary concerns and generate advisory business for your firm?

There are a couple of key approaches you can use to address sponsors’ concerns about their fiduciary responsibilities and sell to the plans and their sponsors.

Believe it or not, there are a number of plans that don’t use an advisor—with the plan sponsor choosing to go it alone to save a few dollars. As reported in a previous edition of the Advisor’s Journal, a significant of number of employee retirement plans (19%) don’t use an outside investment advisor.

Read this complete analysis of the impact at AdvisorFX (sign up for a free trial subscription with full access to all of the planning libraries and client presentations if you are not already a subscriber).

Posted in Wealth Management | Tagged: , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Plan Clients: Where are the Advisory Margins?

Posted by William Byrnes on July 28, 2011


A significant of number of employee retirement plans don’t use an outside investment advisor, often because of the cost. Demonstrating your firm’s flexibility and splitting fiduciary responsibility for the plan could be the key to securing those underserved plans. Customizing your level of service gives these plans what they need—advice—while allowing you to prune services that aren’t cost effective for your firm.

According to the Retirement Plan Survey 2011, released by Grant Thornton LLP, Drinker Biddle & Reath and Plan Sponsor Advisors, greater than 50% of plans use a limited scope investment advisor and 14% of plans use an outsourced investment advisor. Read this complete analysis of the impact at AdvisorFX (sign up for a free trial subscription with full access to all of the planning libraries and client presentations if you are not already a subscriber).

Posted in Wealth Management | Tagged: , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

 
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