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William Byrnes (Texas A&M) tax & compliance articles

Archive for the ‘Taxation’ Category

revised IRS procedure for verifying social security numbers

Posted by William Byrnes on August 28, 2014


IRS logoRevenue Procedure 2014-43 provides guidance to individual payees on verifying social security numbers.

This revenue procedure provides revised procedures for individual payees who are required under Treas. Reg. § 31.3406(d)-5(g)(5) to obtain validation of social security numbers (SSNs) from the Social Security Administration (SSA) to prevent or stop backup withholding under section 3406 of the Internal Revenue Code following receipt of a second backup withholding notice from a payor within a three-year period.

This revenue procedure sets forth revised procedures for an individual payee to obtain validation of the payee’s name and SSN from SSA on or after August 1, 2014.  Following receipt of a second B notice, a copy of a social security card, as described in section 4, is validation from the SSA of a name and SSN combination.

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7 Tax Facts for Vacation Home Rentals

Posted by William Byrnes on August 25, 2014


IRS logoIRS Summertime Tax Tip 2014-13 addressed the topic of a taxpayer renting to others, such as summer vacation rentals in San Diego.

The IRS stated that of a taxpayer rents a home to others, then usually the taxpayer must report the rental income on the tax return.  But the taxpayer may not have to report the income if the rental period is less than 15 days and the property is also the taxpayer’s home.

In most cases, a taxpayer can deduct the costs of renting a property.  However, the deduction may be limited if the property is also the taxpayer’s home.

The IRS provided 7 tax facts about renting out a vacation home.

  1. Vacation Home.  A vacation home can be a house, apartment, condominium, mobile home, boat or similar property.
  2. Schedule E.  A taxpayer will report rental income and rental expenses on Schedule E, Supplemental Income and Loss.  The rental income may also be subject to Net Investment Income Tax.
  3. Used as a Home.  If the property is “used as a home,” then the rental expense deduction is limited.  This means that the deduction for rental expenses can not be more than the rental income received.  See Publication 527, Residential Rental Property (Including Rental of Vacation Homes).
  4. Divide Expenses.  If a taxpayer uses the property and also rents it to others, then special rules apply.  The taxpayer must divide the expenses between the rental use and the personal use.  To figure how to divide the costs, compare the number of days for each type of use with the total days of use.
  5. Personal Use.  Personal use may include use by the taxpayer’s family.  It may also include use by any other property owners or their family.  Use by anyone who pays less than a fair rental price is also personal use.
  6. Schedule A.  Report deductible expenses for personal use on Schedule A, Itemized Deductions. These may include costs such as mortgage interest, property taxes and casualty losses.
  7. Rented Less than 15 Days.  If the property is “used as a home” and rented out fewer than 15 days per year, then the taxpayer does not have to report the rental income.

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8 Tax Facts a Home Seller Should Know

Posted by William Byrnes on August 18, 2014


IRS logoIn its 8th tax tip of summer, the IRS revealed that if a taxpayer sells a home for a profit, the gain may not be taxable.  The IRS provided eight tax facts about selling a home in 2014.

1. A capital gain, or a part of it, on the sale of a home may not be taxable.  This rule may apply if the home is owned and used it as the main home for at least two out of the five years before the date of sale.  However, there are exceptions to the “ownership and use” rules. Some exceptions apply to persons with a disability. Some apply to certain members of the military and certain government and Peace Corps workers.

2. Up to $250,000 of gain will not be taxable for an individual, and $500,000 for married, filing a joint return.  The Obama Care Net Investment Income Tax will also not apply to the excluded gain.

3. If the gain is not taxable because it falls beneath the threshold, then the taxpayer may not be required to report the sale to the IRS on the 2014 tax return, filed in 2015.

4. However, a taxpayer must report the sale on the 2014 tax return if part or all of the gain cannot be excluded from tax, or if the taxpayer receives a Form 1099-S, Proceeds From Real Estate Transactions.  The additional Net Investment Income Tax may apply to the gain.

5. Generally, a taxpayer can only exclude the gain from the sale of a main home once every two years.

6.  If a taxpayer has more than one home, then the taxpayer may only exclude the gain on the sale of the main home, which is usually the home lived in most of the time.

7. If a taxpayer claimed the first-time homebuyer credit when purchasing the home, then special rules apply to the sale.

8. A loss on a home sale can not be deducted.

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5 Tax Tips for New Business

Posted by William Byrnes on August 11, 2014


IRS logoIn its summer time Tax Tips 9-2014, the IRS provided 5 tax tips to taxpayers who start a new business during 2014.

1. Business Structure.  The IRS stated that taxpayers should choose the business type for the new business. Some common types of entities include sole proprietorship, partnership, S corporation, Limited Liability Company (LLC) and C corporation (normally just referred to as a ‘corporation’).  The type of business chosen will determine the IRS form(s) that must be used to annually report information and to determine tax owing to the IRS.

2. Business Taxes.  There are four general types of business taxes. They are income tax, self-employment tax, employment tax and excise tax. The type of taxes a business pays usually depends on which type of business the taxpayer chose to set up.

3. Employer Identification Number.  A taxpayer may need to get an EIN for federal tax purposes in order to file the tax form necessary for the business type.

4. Accounting Method.  An accounting method is a set of rules that determine when to report income and expenses. A business must use a consistent method. The two that are most common are the cash method and the accrual method. Under the cash method, income is reported in the year received and expenses are deducted in the year paid.  Under the accrual method, income is reported in the year earn, regardless of when payment was actually made, and expenses are deducted in the year incur, regardless of when paid.

5. Employee Health Care.  The Small Business Health Care Tax Credit helps small businesses and tax-exempt organizations pay for health care coverage they offer their employees.  A small employer is eligible for the credit if it has fewer than 25 employees who work full-time, or a combination of full-time and part-time. Beginning in 2014, the maximum credit is 50 percent of premiums paid for small business employers and 35 percent of premiums paid for small tax-exempt employers, such as charities.

For 2015 and after, employers employing at least a certain number of employees (generally 50 full-time employees or a combination of full-time and part-time employees that is equivalent to 50 full-time employees) will be subject to the Employer Shared Responsibility provision.

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Are you paying too much or too little tax?

Posted by William Byrnes on August 7, 2014


IRS logoIn Summer Tax Tip 10-2014, the IRS disclosed that that many taxpayers will discover that they either get a larger refund or owe more tax than they expected next April 15, 2015.  But, the IRS stated, this type of tax surprise is controllable by the taxpayer.

One way to prevent owing more tax next April 15, plus interest and any penalty, or to avoid having too much tax withheld, is to adjust the amount of tax withheld from salary.

Another way to prevent interest and penalties on April 15th is to change the amount of estimated tax paid during the year.

Factors the IRS wants taxpayers to consider during the summer include:

•    New Job.   A taxpayer must fill out and submit Form W-4, Employee’s Withholding Allowance Certificate in order to begin new employment.  The employer will use the information provided by the taxpayer on this form to calculate the amount of federal income tax to withhold from the paycheck.

•    Estimated Tax.  A taxpayer may need to pay estimated tax directly to the IRS during 2014 BEFORE filing the April 15 tax return in 2015.  If a taxpayer earns income without withholding, such as self-employment, interest, dividends or rent, then it is likely that the taxpayer owes estimated tax.  For the year 2014, tax may be due also on June 16, 2014, on Sept. 15 in 2014, on Jan. 15, 2015, and of course, also on Wednesday, April 15, 2015.  Read more about estimated tax here.

•    Life Event Change.  Married?  New Child?  New House?  The Form W-4 or Estimated Tax calculation needs to be updated to reflect a marriage, a child, or the purchase of a new home.

•    Changes in Circumstances.  A taxpayer that receives advance payment of the Obama Care premium tax credit in 2014 must report changes in circumstances, such as changes in income or family size, to the Health Insurance Marketplace where the medical insurance was bought for the year.  Also, a taxpayer must notify the Marketplace if moving away from the geographic area covered by the Marketplace plan.  Read more here.

 

 

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Getting Married – How Must I Include the IRS In My Wedding Plans?

Posted by William Byrnes on July 28, 2014


Why would a taxpayer want to include the IRS in his or her wedding plans?  Well, “its the law”.

No, the taxpayer does not need to send a wedding invitation to the closest IRS office.  But a 2014 marriage results in changes to the new married “couple’s” 2014 tax filing and possibly amount owed in tax for 2014.  Whether the couple will owe more in tax each year, including the year of marriage, over that of the combined amount of each individual’s tax due, depends on several factors, such as whether both spouses have income and how much that income is.  In general, a married couple, when both spouses are employed, pay more income tax than if they remained single and filed individual tax returns.  Also, the married couple may owe, and may owe more, of the additional 3.8% Net Investment Income Tax.

The IRS’ Summer Tax Tip 2014-2 reminds taxpayers that marriage has certain tax consequences from at least a filing persepctive.  These include:

Change in filing status.  If a couple is married before, or even on Dec. 31, 2014 at 11:59pm, then for the whole year of 2014 for tax purposes the IRS considers the couple married. Thus, neither spouse may file an individual’s tax return any longer.  Instead, the married couple must choose to file your federal income tax return either jointly or separately (as a married couple) for 2014.

Same-sex married couples:  If the couple is legally married in a state or country that recognizes same-sex marriage, then the couple must file as married for the federal tax return. This is true even if you and your spouse later live in a state or country that does not recognize same-sex marriage.

Name change. The names and Social Security numbers listed on a tax return must match the Social Security Administration records. If a spouse changes the family name, then that name change must be reported to SSA.

Change tax withholding.  A change in marital status requires that a new Form W-4 for each spouse’s employer (Employee’s Withholding Allowance Certificate).  If it normal that when both spouse have income, the combined incomes moves each into a higher tax bracket for withholding at work.  Use the IRS Withholding Calculator tool to assist completing a new Form W-4.

Obama Care Premium Tax Credit changes in circumstances.  If a taxpayer took advantage of receiving the advance payment of the premium tax credit in 2014, then it is required to report changes in circumstances, such as changes in income, marriage, or family size, to the Health Insurance Marketplace.  Moreover, if one spouse will move out of the area covered of a current Marketplace plan, then that spouse must notify the Marketplace.

Address change for IRS letters.  A taxpayer has the responsibility to inform that IRS of an address changes.  To do that, file Form 8822, Change of Address, with the IRS.  Also, separately, the taxpayer should ask the U.S. Postal Service online at USPS.com to forward any mail sent to the former address.

2014_tf_on_individuals_small_businesses-m_1Due to a number of recent changes in the law, taxpayers are currently facing many questions connected to important issues such as healthcare, home office use, capital gains, investments, and whether an individual is considered an employee or a contractor. Financial advisors are continually looking for updated tax information that can help them provide the right answers to the right people at the right time. This book provides fast, clear, and authoritative answers to pressing questions, and it does so in the convenient, timesaving, Q&A format for which Tax Facts is famous.

Anyone interested can try Tax Facts on Individuals & Small Business, risk-free for 30 days, with a 100% guarantee of complete satisfaction.  For more information, please go to www.nationalunderwriter.com/TaxFactsIndividuals or call 1-800-543-0874.

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An unconventional retirement planning tool

Posted by William Byrnes on June 30, 2014


When it comes to retirement income planning for most clients, less is not more, and the contribution limits placed on traditional tax-preferred retirement vehicles have many of these clients searching for creative ways to ensure a comfortable retirement income level. Enter the health savings account (HSA), which, though traditionally intended to function as a savings account earmarked for medical expenses, can actually function as a powerful retirement income planning vehicle for clients looking to supplement their retirement savings.

For the strategy to work, however, it is important that your clients understand the rules of the game, and the potential penalties that can derail the substantial tax benefits that an HSA can offer.

The HSA income strategy …

Read William Byrnes & Robert Bloink’s analysis of an unconventional retirement planning tool on LifeHealthPro

 

If you are interested in discussing the Master or Doctoral degree in the areas of international taxation or anti money laundering compliance, please contact me profbyrnes@gmail.com to Google Hangout or Skype that I may take you on an “online tour”

 

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5 Tax Facts about IRS Notices and Letters

Posted by William Byrnes on June 25, 2014


In Tax Tip 2014-60, the IRS disclosed that it sends millions of notices and letters to taxpayers.   Not surprising, given that over 150 million returns are filed each year.   The IRS informed taxpayers of 6 important tips about such notices and letters:

1. The IRS sends letters and notices by mail, never by email nor by social media.  Each notice has specific instructions about what the taxpayer must do to respond.  Often, a taxpayer only needs to respond by mail to deal with whatever the notice requests.  Keep copies of any notices and responses with the annual tax records.

2. The IRS may send a letter or notice for a variety of very different reasons.  Typically, a letter or notice is only about one specific issue on a taxpayer’s federal tax return or about the taxpayer’s tax account.   A notice may simply inform the taxpayer about changes to the tax account or only ask you for more information about an item on the tax return.  However, it may inform the taxpayer that a tax payment is due.

3. A taxpayer may receive a notice that states the IRS has made a change or correction to the tax return.  In this case, the taxpayer should review the information received and then compare it with the original tax return.  If the taxpayer agrees with the IRS notice, then the taxpayer usually does not need to reply except to make a payment.

4. However, if the taxpayer does not agree with the notice, then the taxpayer must respond.  The taxpayer must write a letter to explain why the taxpayer disagrees with the IRS notice, including any information and documents that supports the taxpayer’s position.  The taxpayer must mail a reply, with the bottom tear-off portion of the notice, to the address shown in the upper left-hand corner of the notice.  Allow at least 30 days for a response.

5. A taxpayer does not need to call or visit an IRS office for most notices.  However, if a taxpayer has questions, then call the phone number in the upper right-hand corner of the notice. Have a copy of the tax return and the notice for the call.

tax-facts-online_medium

Robert Bloink, Esq., LL.M., and William H. Byrnes, Esq., LL.M., CWM®—are delivering real-life guidance based on decades of experience.” said Rick Kravitz.  The authors’ knowledge and experience in tax law and practice provides the expert guidance for National Underwriter to once again deliver a valuable resource for the financial advising community.

Anyone interested can try Tax Facts on Individuals & Small Business, risk-free for 30 days, with a 100% guarantee of complete satisfaction.  For more information, please go to www.nationalunderwriter.com/TaxFactsIndividuals or call 1-800-543-0874.

 Authoritative and easy-to-use, 2014 Tax Facts on Insurance & Employee Benefits shows you how the tax law and regulations are relevant to your insurance, employee benefits, and financial planning practices.  Often complex tax law and regulations are explained in clear, understandable language.  Pertinent planning points are provided throughout.

2014 Tax Facts on Investments provides clear, concise answers to often complex tax questions concerning investments.  2014 expanded sections on Limitations on Loss Deductions, Charitable Gifts, Reverse Mortgages, and REITs.

 

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11 health insurance tax facts a taxpayer needs to know about

Posted by William Byrnes on June 24, 2014


Employers and those who advise them may have questions about what expenses qualify for deductions, which tax credits they can take advantage of, and what the new rules mean for grandfathered plans. Individuals may be wondering how HSA distributions are taxed, or whether benefits received under a personal health insurance policy are taxable. 

1. Are premiums paid for personal health insurance deductible as medical expenses?

2. May an employer deduct as a business expense the cost of premiums paid for accident and health insurance for employees?

3. What credit is available for small employers for employee health insurance expenses?

4. Are benefits received under a personal health insurance policy taxable income?

5. How is employer-provided disability income coverage taxed?

6. How is personal disability income coverage taxed?

William Byrnes and Robert Bloink have the well-researched answers you’re looking for on LifeHealthPro !

 


If you are interested in discussing the Master or Doctoral degree in the areas of financial planning, please contact me: profbyrnes@gmail.com to Google Hangout or Skype that I may take you on an “online tour” 

 

 

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Do you Owe a Health Care Coverage Penalty for 2014?

Posted by William Byrnes on June 20, 2014


Deadline to Enroll has Passed

The deadline to enroll in minimum essential health insurance passed on March 30, 2014.   According to estimates by the Federal Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), it met its goal of at least 7 million persons enrolling for health care via the health insurance market places established by the federal government on behalf of various states. Some states, such as California, established their own insurance marketplaces, and thus it is likely that the 7 million figure has indeed been achieved, if not surpassed.

Did Enough Healthy People Enroll to Pay for The System?

The primary question for the federal government that remains is whether the balance of persons enrolling that are “healthy” individuals who must simply pay the annual premium in 2014 but will not actually take dollars from the medical coverage in 2014, will outweigh the payouts to individuals that will take more from health insurance than they pay in.

But What About the Medicaid Expansion?

Moreover, the Affordable Care Act pushed states to expand the definition of when an individual may be covered by the Medicaid, and thus receive medical care substantively paid for by a combination of the federal and state government.  The federal government upfront will provide 90% of a state’s additional medicare cost.  The state must shoulder more of this burden in the future though.

How Will This Be Paid For?

How will the federal government pay for its share of the additional medicare costs and for any additional costs associated with this new federally mandated system?  Some government officials state that Obama Care is already set up to pay for itself because the medical profession, insurance companies, and taxpayers will pick up the additional costs.  Insurance companies will reduce their own administrative costs, the medical profession will offer its services at cheaper prices, and Congress has already raised taxes in the forms of the increased medicare payroll tax and medicare tax on investment income.

The New “Shared Responsibility Payment” Tax, Penalty, Fine

But also, Congress imposed a required payment (some pundits call it a penalty, some call it a tax, others a fine like a parking ticket) on taxpayers who do not obtain and maintain health coverage, that will over time increase.  As the required penalty increases over the coming years, in principle at least, it should be cheaper for a taxpayer to simply buy the lowest cost health insurance than to pay this penalty.  This assumes that the cost of the lowest quality health insurance in these marketplaces does not sky rocket to over come the penalty.

Congress did not call the penalty a “penalty” in the actual law. Instead, Congress used a more ‘voter friendly’ expression “individual shared responsibility payment”.

An Example Decision Maker Deciding What to do in 2014

Other factors will play a role in this decision process, such as a individual’s appetite to take on catastrophic medical risk  (like breaking all their bones in an accident) and weighing the cost of the insurance and the required deductible. If an individual’s annual premium will cost by example approximately $7,200 and the annual deductible is $6,000 (this is an actual example from an insurance policy offered via the 2014 California Marketplace), and the individual thinks that it is extremely unlikely that he or she will spend more than $13,200 in medical costs in 2014, then the individual may opt for the “shared responsibility payment”.

If nothing medically happens during 2014, the taxpayer will only owe the contribution, and thus have saved over $13,000!  However, if something catastrophic happens in 2014 requiring substantial medical expenses over $13,200, the taxpayer will have been better off with the insurance.  Another economic factor in this economic decision making process includes the amount of co-pay required per type of medical procedure.  Another factor in the risk decision making process is the individual’s belief of potentially requiring a certain level of medical expenses, such as perhaps just a stomach virus and the likely out of pocket cost of that care, versus breaking a bone.

How much is the penalty for 2014 if a taxpayer did not have “minimum essential coverage’ by March 30, 2014?

If a taxpayer (or any dependents) do not maintain health care coverage and do not qualify for an exemption, then the taxpayer must make an individual shared responsibility payment with the 2014 tax return.  In general, this health care coverage penalty is either a percentage of the taxpayer’s income or a flat dollar amount, whichever is greater.  High income taxpayers will pay a higher penalty.  A taxpayer will owe 1/12th of this penalty for each month of the taxpayer or taxpayer’s dependents gap in coverage.  The annual payment amount for 2014 is the greater of:

  • one percent (1%) of the household income that is above the tax return threshold for the taxpayer’s filing status, such as Married Filing Jointly or single, or
  • a family’s flat dollar amount, which is $95 per adult and $47.50 per child, limited to a maximum of $285.

This individual shared responsibility payment is capped at the cost of the national average premium for the bronze level health plan available through the Marketplace in 2014.  The taxpayer will pay the due amount with the 2014 federal income tax return filed in 2015.  For example, a single adult under age 65 with household income less than $19,650 (but more than $10,150) would pay the $95 flat rate.  However, a single adult under age 65 with household income greater than $19,650 would pay an annual payment based on the one percent rate.  

Why greater than $19,650?  The filing threshold for a single adult in 2014 is 10,150, subtract that from $19,650, leaving a base amount of $9, 500.  Multiply 1% to that base amount and the penalty is $95, the same as the flat rate.

So, from the beginning of this year (January 1, 2014) a taxpayer and the family must either have “qualifying” health insurance coverage throughout the year, qualify for an exemption from coverage, or make the above payment when filing the 2014 federal income tax return in 2015.

What is “Minimum Essential Coverage” Under the Affordable Care Act (“ACA”)?

In Health Care Tax Tip 12, the IRS explained for a taxpayer how to determine if his or her health care coverage qualifies as “minimum essential coverage” to avoid the health care coverage penalty for 2014 that must be paid by April 15, 2015 when filing the tax return.

The Affordable Care Act calls for individuals to have and maintain qualifying health insurance coverage for each month of the year, or have an exemption, or make a shared responsibility payment (pay a ‘penalty’) when filing their federal income tax return next year by April 15, 2015.

Qualifying health insurance coverage, called minimum essential coverage, includes coverage under various, but not all, types of health care coverage plans. The IRS stated that the majority of coverage that people have today counts as minimum essential coverage.

The IRS provided examples of minimum essential coverage:

  • Health insurance coverage provided by an employer,
  • Health insurance purchased through the Health Insurance Marketplace,
  • Coverage provided under a government-sponsored program (including Medicare, Medicaid, and health care programs for veterans), and
  • Health insurance purchased directly from an insurance company.

Minimum essential coverage does not include coverage providing only limited benefits, such as:

  • Coverage consisting solely of excepted benefits, such as:
    • Stand-alone vision and dental insurance
    • Workers’ compensation
    • Accident or disability income insurance
  • Medicaid plans that provide limited coverage such as only family planning services or only treatment of emergency medical conditions.

tax-facts-online_medium

Due to a number of recent changes in the law, taxpayers are currently facing many questions connected to important issues such as healthcare, home office use, capital gains, investments, and whether an individual is considered an employee or a contractor. Financial advisors are continually looking for updated tax information that can help them provide the right answers to the right people at the right time. This brand-new resource provides fast, clear, and authoritative answers to pressing questions, and it does so in the convenient, timesaving, Q&A format for which Tax Facts is famous.

Our brand-new Tax Facts title is exciting in many ways,” says Rick Kravitz, Vice President & Managing Director of Summit Professional Network’s Professional Publishing Division. “First of all, it fills a huge gap in the resources available to today’s advisors. Small business is a big market, and this book enables advisors to get up-and-running right away, with proven guidance that will help them serve their clients’ needs. Secondly, it addresses the biggest questions facing all taxpayers and provides absolutely reliable answers that help advisors solve today’s biggest problems with confidence.”

Robert Bloink, Esq., LL.M., and William H. Byrnes, Esq., LL.M., CWM®—are delivering real-life guidance based on decades of experience.  The authors’ knowledge and experience in tax law and practice provides the expert guidance for National Underwriter to once again deliver a valuable resource for the financial advising community,” added Rick Kravitz.

Anyone interested can try Tax Facts on Individuals & Small Business, risk-free for 30 days, with a 100% guarantee of complete satisfaction.  For more information, please go to www.nationalunderwriter.com/TaxFactsIndividuals or call 1-800-543-0874.

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6 Tax Facts About the Additional Medicare Tax

Posted by William Byrnes on June 19, 2014


In Tax Tip 54, the IRS alerted taxpayers that if their income exceeds certain limits, then they may be liable for an Additional Medicare Tax.  6 Tax Tips Regarding the Additional Medicare Tax are:

1. The Additional Medicare Tax is 0.9%.  It applies to the amount of a taxpayer’s wages, self-employment income and railroad retirement (RRTA) compensation that is more than a “threshold” amount. The threshold amount that applies is based on your filing status.  If a taxpayer is married and file a joint return, then the taxpayer must combine both spouse’s wages, compensation, or self-employment income to determine if that income exceeds the “married filing jointly” threshold.

2. The threshold amounts are:

 Filing Status                   Threshold Amount
Married filing jointly           $250,000
Married filing separately   $125,000
Single                                         $200,000
Head of household               $200,000
Qualifying widow(er) with dependent child      $200,000

3. A taxpayer must combine all wages and all self-employment income to determine if the total income exceeds the threshold.  A taxpayer may not consider a loss from self-employment when calculating this additional medicare tax.  The taxpayer must compare RRTA compensation separately to the threshold.  See the instructions for Form 8959, Additional Medicare Tax, for examples.

4. Employers must withhold this tax from wages or compensation when paying a taxpayer more than $200,000 in a calendar year, without regard to filing status.  The employer does not combine the wages for married couples to determine whether to withhold Additional Medicare Tax.

5. A taxpayer may owe more tax than the amount withheld, depending on the filing status and other income. In that case, the taxpayer must make estimated tax payments /or request additional income tax withholding using Form W-4, Employee’s Withholding Allowance Certificate.  If a taxpayer has too little tax withheld, or did not pay enough estimated tax, the taxpayer may owe an estimated tax penalty. For more on this topic, see Publication 505, Tax Withholding and Estimated Tax.

6. File Form 8959 with the tax return if owing Additional Medicare Tax.  The taxpayer must also report any Additional Medicare Tax withheld by an employer on Form 8959.

IRS Examples:

How do individuals calculate Additional Medicare Tax if they have wages subject to Federal Insurance Contributions Act (FICA) tax and self-employment income subject to Self-Employment Contributions Act (SECA) tax?

Individuals with wages subject to FICA tax and self-employment income subject to SECA tax calculate their liabilities for Additional Medicare Tax in three steps:

Step 1. Calculate Additional Medicare Tax on any wages in excess of the applicable threshold for the filing status, without regard to whether any tax was withheld.

Step 2. Reduce the applicable threshold for the filing status by the total amount of Medicare wages received, but not below zero.

Step 3. Calculate Additional Medicare Tax on any self-employment income in excess of the reduced threshold.

Example 1. C, a single filer, has $130,000 in wages and $145,000 in self-employment income.

  1. C’s wages are not in excess of the $200,000 threshold for single filers, so C is not liable for Additional Medicare Tax on these wages.
  2. Before calculating the Additional Medicare Tax on self-employment income, the $200,000 threshold for single filers is reduced by C’s $130,000 in wages, resulting in a reduced self-employment income threshold of $70,000.
  3. C is liable to pay Additional Medicare Tax on $75,000 of self-employment income ($145,000 in self-employment income minus the reduced threshold of $70,000).

Example 2. D and E are married and file jointly. D has $150,000 in wages and E has $175,000 in self-employment income.

  1. D’s wages are not in excess of the $250,000 threshold for joint filers, so D and E are not liable for Additional Medicare Tax on D’s wages.
  2. Before calculating the Additional Medicare Tax on E’s self-employment income, the $250,000 threshold for joint filers is reduced by D’s $150,000 in wages resulting in a reduced self-employment income threshold of $100,000.
  3. D and E are liable to pay Additional Medicare Tax on $75,000 of self-employment income ($175,000 in self-employment income minus the reduced threshold of $100,000).

tax-facts-online_medium

Due to a number of recent changes in the law, taxpayers are currently facing many questions connected to important issues such as healthcare, home office use, capital gains, investments, and whether an individual is considered an employee or a contractor. Financial advisors are continually looking for updated tax information that can help them provide the right answers to the right people at the right time. This brand-new resource provides fast, clear, and authoritative answers to pressing questions, and it does so in the convenient, timesaving, Q&A format for which Tax Facts is famous.

Our brand-new Tax Facts title is exciting in many ways,” says Rick Kravitz, Vice President & Managing Director of Summit Professional Network’s Professional Publishing Division. “First of all, it fills a huge gap in the resources available to today’s advisors. Small business is a big market, and this book enables advisors to get up-and-running right away, with proven guidance that will help them serve their clients’ needs. Secondly, it addresses the biggest questions facing all taxpayers and provides absolutely reliable answers that help advisors solve today’s biggest problems with confidence.”

Robert Bloink, Esq., LL.M., and William H. Byrnes, Esq., LL.M., CWM®—are delivering real-life guidance based on decades of experience.  The authors’ knowledge and experience in tax law and practice provides the expert guidance for National Underwriter to once again deliver a valuable resource for the financial advising community,” added Rick Kravitz.

Anyone interested can try Tax Facts on Individuals & Small Business, risk-free for 30 days, with a 100% guarantee of complete satisfaction.  For more information, please go to www.nationalunderwriter.com/TaxFactsIndividuals or call 1-800-543-0874.

Posted in Taxation | Tagged: , , , | 1 Comment »

8 Tax Facts about Penalties for Late Filing and Paying Taxes

Posted by William Byrnes on June 18, 2014


In Tax Tip 2014-56, the IRS provided 9 tax facts that a taxpayer needs to know about late filing and late paying tax penalties after the deadline of April 15.  By example, taxpayers should be made aware that the failure-to-file penalty is usually 10 times greater than the failure-to-pay penalty.  So the IRS encourages taxpayers to file on time, even if they cannot pay on time.

1. If a taxpayer is due a federal tax refund then there is no penalty if the tax return is filed later than April 15.  However, if a taxpayer owes taxes and fails to file the tax return by April 15 or fails to pay any tax due by April 15,  then the taxpayer will probably owe interest and penalties on the tax still after April 15.

2. Two federal penalties may apply. The first is a failure-to-file penalty for late filing. The second is a failure-to-pay penalty for paying late.

3. The failure-to-file penalty is usually much more than the failure-to-pay penalty.  In most cases, it is 10 times more!!!  So if a taxpayer cannot pay what is owe by April 15, the taxpayer should still file a tax return on time and pay as much as possible to reduce the balance.

4. The failure-to-file penalty is normally 5% of the unpaid taxes for each month or part of a month that a tax return is late. It will not exceed 25% of the unpaid taxes.

5. If a taxpayer files a return more than 60 days after the due date (or extended due date), the minimum penalty for late filing is the smaller of $135 or 100% of the unpaid tax.

6. The failure-to-pay penalty is generally 0.5% per month of your unpaid taxes.  It applies for each month or part of a month your taxes remain unpaid and starts accruing the day after taxes are due.  It can build up to as much as 25% of the unpaid taxes.

7. If the 5% failure-to-file penalty and the 0.5% failure-to-pay penalty both apply in any month, the maximum penalty amount charged for that month is 5%.

8. If a taxpayer requested the 6-month extension of time to file the income tax return (until October 15) by the tax due date of April 15 and paid at least 90% of the taxes that are owed, then the taxpayer may not face a failure-to-pay penalty.  However, the taxpayer must pay the remaining balance by the extended due date.  The taxpayer will still owe interest on any taxes paid after the April 15 due date.

9. A taxpayer may avoid a failure-to-file or failure-to-pay penalty if able to show reasonable cause for not filing or paying on time.

tax-facts-online_medium

Because of the constant changes to the tax law, taxpayers are currently facing many questions connected to important issues such as healthcare, home office use, capital gains, investments, and whether an individual is considered an employee or a contractor. Financial advisors are continually looking for updated tax information that can help them provide the right answers to the right people at the right time. For over 110 years, National Underwriter has provided fast, clear, and authoritative answers to financial advisors pressing questions, and it does so in the convenient, timesaving, Q&A format.

“Our brand-new Tax Facts title is exciting in many ways,” says Rick Kravitz, Vice President & Managing Director of Summit Professional Network’s Professional Publishing Division. “First of all, it fills a huge gap in the resources available to today’s advisors. Small business is a big market, and this book enables advisors to get up-and-running right away, with proven guidance that will help them serve their clients’ needs. Secondly, it addresses the biggest questions facing all taxpayers and provides absolutely reliable answers that help advisors solve today’s biggest problems with confidence.”

Robert Bloink, Esq., LL.M., and William H. Byrnes, Esq., LL.M., CWM®—are delivering real-life guidance based on decades of experience.  The authors’ knowledge and experience in tax law and practice provides the expert guidance for National Underwriter to once again deliver a valuable resource for the financial advising community,” added Rick Kravitz.

Anyone interested can try Tax Facts on Individuals & Small Business, risk-free for 30 days, with a 100% guarantee of complete satisfaction.  For more information, please go to www.nationalunderwriter.com/TaxFactsIndividuals or call 1-800-543-0874.


If you are interested in discussing the Master or Doctoral degree in the areas of financial services or international taxation, please contact me: profbyrnes@gmail.com to Google Hangout or Skype that I may take you on an “online tour” 

Posted in Taxation | Tagged: , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Filing Requirement for NRA with US Source Income?

Posted by William Byrnes on June 10, 2014


Nonresident Aliens with US Source Income?

Nonresident aliens (“NRA”) who received income from U.S. sources in 2013 also must determine whether they have a U.S. tax obligation. The filing deadline for nonresident aliens can be April 15 or June 16 depending on sources of income. See Taxation of Nonresident Aliens.

Who is a Nonresident Alien for US tax Purposes?

An alien is any individual who is not a U.S. citizen or U.S. national.

A resident alien is an alien who has passed either the green card test or the substantial presence test.  A nonresident alien is everyone other alien.

Who Must File a US tax Return?

If an alien is covered under either of the following 2 categories , then the alien must file a US tax return:

  1. A nonresident alien individual engaged or considered to be engaged in a trade or business in the United States during the year.
  2. A nonresident alien individual who is not engaged in a trade or business in the United States and has U.S. income on which the tax liability was not satisfied by the withholding of tax at the source.

Which Income to Report?

A nonresident alien’s income that is subject to U.S. income tax must generally be divided into 2 categories:

Effectively Connected Income, after allowable deductions, is taxed at graduated rates. These are the same rates that apply to U.S. citizens and residents. Effectively Connected Income should be reported on page one of Form 1040NR, U.S. Nonresident Alien Income Tax Return.

FDAP income generally consists of passive investment income; however, in theory, it could consist of almost any sort of income. FDAP income is taxed at a flat 30% (or lower treaty rate) and no deductions are allowed against such income. FDAP income should be reported on page four of Form 1040NR.

Which Form to File?

Nonresident aliens who are required to file an income tax return must use:

What is US Source Income Subject to US tax?

A nonresident alien (NRA) usually is subject to U.S. income tax only on U.S. source income. The general rules for determining U.S. source income that apply to most nonresident aliens are shown below:

Summary of Source Rules for Income of Nonresident Aliens
Item of Income Factor Determining Source

Salaries, wages, other compensation

Where services performed

Business income: Personal services Where services performed
Business income: Sale of inventory -purchased Where sold

Business income: Sale of inventory -produced

Where produced (Allocation may be necessary)

Interest

Residence of payer

Dividends

Whether a U.S. or foreign corporation*

Rents

Location of property

Royalties: Natural resources Location of property

Royalties: Patents, copyrights, etc.

Where property is used

Sale of real property

Location of property

Sale of personal property

Seller’s tax home (but see Personal Property, in Chapter 2 of Publication 519, for exceptions)

Pensions

Where services were performed that earned the pension

Scholarships – Fellowships Generally, the residence of the payer

Sale of natural resources

Allocation based on fair market value of product at export terminal. For more information, see IRC section 1.863–1(b) of the regulations.

*Exceptions include: a) Dividends paid by a U.S. corporation are foreign source if the corporation elects the Puerto Rico economic activity credit or possessions tax credit. b) Part of a dividend paid by a foreign corporation is U.S. source if at least 25% of the corporation’s gross income is effectively connected with a U.S. trade or business for the 3 tax years before the year in which the dividends are declared.

tax-facts-online_medium

Due to a number of recent changes in the law, taxpayers are currently facing many questions connected to important issues such as healthcare, home office use, capital gains, investments, and whether an individual is considered an employee or a contractor. Financial advisors are continually looking for updated tax information that can help them provide the right answers to the right people at the right time. This brand-new resource provides fast, clear, and authoritative answers to pressing questions, and it does so in the convenient, timesaving, Q&A format for which Tax Facts is famous.

“Our brand-new Tax Facts title is exciting in many ways,” says Rick Kravitz, Vice President & Managing Director of Summit Professional Network’s Professional Publishing Division. “First of all, it fills a huge gap in the resources available to today’s advisors. Small business is a big market, and this book enables advisors to get up-and-running right away, with proven guidance that will help them serve their clients’ needs. Secondly, it addresses the biggest questions facing all taxpayers and provides absolutely reliable answers that help advisors solve today’s biggest problems with confidence.”

Robert Bloink, Esq., LL.M., and William H. Byrnes, Esq., LL.M., CWM®—are delivering real-life guidance based on decades of experience.  The authors’ knowledge and experience in tax law and practice provides the expert guidance for National Underwriter to once again deliver a valuable resource for the financial advising community,” added Rick Kravitz.

Anyone interested can try Tax Facts on Individuals & Small Business, risk-free for 30 days, with a 100% guarantee of complete satisfaction.  For more information, please go to www.nationalunderwriter.com/TaxFactsIndividuals or call 1-800-543-0874.

  If you are interested in discussing the Master or Doctoral degree in the areas of financial services or international taxation, please contact me: profbyrnes@gmail.com to Google Hangout or Skype that I may take you on an “online tour”

Posted in Taxation | Tagged: , , , | Leave a Comment »

What are the tax advantages of owning exchange-traded funds (ETFs)? 10 tax tips to investments …

Posted by William Byrnes on June 5, 2014


What are the tax advantages of owning exchange-traded funds (ETFs)?

ETFs enjoy a more favorable tax treatment than mutual funds due to their unique structure. …

How are ETFs taxed? …

How are dividends received from a mutual fund taxed?

… may pay three types of dividends to their shareholders …

These and 7 other tax questions about investments are answered in our article and analysis on LifeHealthPro

 

If you are interested in discussing the Master or Doctoral degree in the areas of financial planning, please contact me: profbyrnes@gmail.com to Google Hangout or Skype that I may take you on an “online tour” 

Posted in Taxation, Wealth Management | Tagged: , , , , | Leave a Comment »

3 Tax Facts for US Taxpayers Living Abroad or With Foreign Assets

Posted by William Byrnes on June 2, 2014


In Newswire 2014-52, IRS reminded US taxpayers living abroad of 3 Tax Facts concerning filing requirements.

1. Filing Requirements of a US taxpayer Living and / or Working in a Foreign Country?

The Internal Revenue Service reminds U.S. citizens and resident aliens, including those with dual citizenship who have lived or worked abroad during all or part of 2013, that they may have a U.S. tax liability and a filing requirement in 2014.

The filing deadline for a tax return for a US taxpayer who lives or works outside the US (or serving in the military outside the U.S.) is Monday, June 16, 2014.  To use this automatic two-month extension, taxpayers must attach a statement to their return explaining which of these two situations applies. See U.S. Citizens and Resident Aliens Abroad for details.

2. Foreign Assets Reporting?

Federal law requires U.S. citizens and resident aliens to report any worldwide income, including income from foreign trusts and foreign bank and securities accounts. In most cases, affected taxpayers need to fill out and attach Schedule B to their tax return. Certain taxpayers may also have to fill out and attach to their return Form 8938, Statement of Foreign Financial Assets.

Part III of Schedule B asks about the existence of foreign accounts, such as bank and securities accounts, and usually requires U.S. citizens to report the country in which each account is located.

Generally, U.S. citizens, resident aliens and certain nonresident aliens must report specified foreign financial assets on Form 8938 if the aggregate value of those assets exceeds certain thresholds. See the instructions for this form for details.

3. FBAR Reporting Also Required?

Separately, taxpayers with foreign accounts whose aggregate value exceeded $10,000 at any time during 2013 must file electronically with the Treasury Department a Financial Crimes Enforcement Network (FinCEN) Form 114, Report of Foreign Bank and Financial Accounts (FBAR). This form replaces TD F 90-22.1, the FBAR form used in the past. It is due to the Treasury Department by June 30, 2014, must be filed electronically and is only available online through the BSA E-Filing System website. For details regarding the FBAR requirements, see Report of Foreign Bank and Financial Accounts (FBAR).

Any U.S. taxpayer here or abroad with tax questions can use the online IRS Tax Map and the International Tax Topic Index to get answers.

tax-facts-online_medium

Due to a number of recent changes in the law, taxpayers are currently facing many questions connected to important issues such as healthcare, home office use, capital gains, investments, and whether an individual is considered an employee or a contractor. Financial advisors are continually looking for updated tax information that can help them provide the right answers to the right people at the right time. This brand-new resource provides fast, clear, and authoritative answers to pressing questions, and it does so in the convenient, timesaving, Q&A format for which Tax Facts is famous.

“Our brand-new Tax Facts title is exciting in many ways,” says Rick Kravitz, Vice President & Managing Director of Summit Professional Network’s Professional Publishing Division. “First of all, it fills a huge gap in the resources available to today’s advisors. Small business is a big market, and this book enables advisors to get up-and-running right away, with proven guidance that will help them serve their clients’ needs. Secondly, it addresses the biggest questions facing all taxpayers and provides absolutely reliable answers that help advisors solve today’s biggest problems with confidence.”

Robert Bloink, Esq., LL.M., and William H. Byrnes, Esq., LL.M., CWM®—are delivering real-life guidance based on decades of experience.  The authors’ knowledge and experience in tax law and practice provides the expert guidance for National Underwriter to once again deliver a valuable resource for the financial advising community,” added Rick Kravitz.

Anyone interested can try Tax Facts on Individuals & Small Business, risk-free for 30 days, with a 100% guarantee of complete satisfaction.  For more information, please go to www.nationalunderwriter.com/TaxFactsIndividuals or call 1-800-543-0874.

For an indepth analysis of deductions for donations to U.S. charities (and the government’s policy encouraging or discouraging these donations), download my article at http://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=2304044

If you are interested in discussing the Master or Doctoral degree in the areas of financial services or international taxation, please contact me: profbyrnes@gmail.com to Google Hangout or Skype that I may take you on an “online tour”

Posted in Compliance, FATCA, Taxation | Tagged: , , , , | 1 Comment »

Can’t Pay Your Tax Debt? What is an Offer in Compromise?

Posted by William Byrnes on May 28, 2014


What is an Offer in Compromise?

An offer in compromise allows a taxpayer in certain situations to settle a tax debt for less than the full amount of that debt.  An offer in compromise may be a legitimate option when a taxpayer cannot pay a full tax liability, or paying the full tax liability will create a financial hardship.

The IRS considers the taxpayer’s following unique set of facts and circumstances:

  • Ability to pay;
  • Income;
  • Expenses; and
  • Asset equity.

The IRS states that it will generally approve an offer in compromise when the amount offered represents the most that the IRS thinks that it can expect to collect within a reasonable period of time.

Who is Eligible for an Offer in Compromise?

Before the IRS is able to consider an offer in compromise from a taxpayer, the taxpayer must first be current with all filing and payment requirements.  A taxpayer is not eligible if the taxpayer is in an open bankruptcy proceeding.  Use the Offer in Compromise Pre-Qualifier to confirm eligibility and to prepare a preliminary offer in compromise proposal.

How to Submit an Offer in Compromise?

Step-by-step instructions and all the forms for submitting an Offer in Compromise may be found in the Booklet Form 656-B (PDF).  The Offer in Compromise must include:

How to Select a payment option?

The initial payment will vary based on the offer and the payment option chosen with the offer:

  • Lump Sum Cash: Submit an initial payment of 20 % of the total offer amount with the application for Offer in Compromise.  Wait for written acceptance, then pay the remaining balance of the offer in five or fewer payments.
  • Periodic Payment: Submit the initial payment with the application. Continue to pay the remaining balance in monthly installments while the IRS considers the offer in compromise.  If accepted, continue to pay monthly until it is paid in full.

If a taxpayer meets the Low Income Certification guidelines, then the taxpayer does not need to send the application fee or the initial payment and will not need to make monthly installments during the evaluation of the offer in compromise.

What Happens During the Evaluation of the Offer in Compromise?

  • Non-refundable payments and fees will be applied to the tax liability, payments may be designated to a specific tax year and tax debt;
  • A Notice of Federal Tax Lien may be filed;
  • Other collection activities are temporarily suspended;
  • The legal assessment and collection period is extended;
  • Make all required payments associated with the offer;
  • Payments on an existing installment agreement may be temporarily suspended; and
  • The Offer in Compromise is automatically accepted if the IRS does not make a determination within two years of the IRS receipt date.
If the offer is accepted If your offer is rejected
  • Meet all the Offer Terms listed in Section 8 of Form 656, including filing all required tax returns and making all payments;
  • Any refunds due within the calendar year in which your offer is accepted will be applied to the tax debt;
  • Federal tax liens are not released until the offer terms are satisfied; and
  • Certain offer information is available for public review at designated IRS offices.
  • A taxpayer may appeal a rejection within 30 days using Request for Appeal of Offer in Compromise, Form 13711 (PDF).

2014_tf_on_individuals_small_businesses-m_1For over 110 years, National Underwriter has provided fast, clear, and authoritative answers to financial advisors pressing questions, and it does so in the convenient, timesaving, Q&A format.  “Our brand-new Tax Facts title is exciting in many ways,” says Rick Kravitz, Vice President & Managing Director. “First of all, it fills a huge gap in the resources available to today’s advisors. Small business is a big market, and this book enables advisors to get up-and-running right away, with proven guidance that will help them serve their clients’ needs. Secondly, it addresses the biggest questions facing all taxpayers and provides absolutely reliable answers that help advisors solve today’s biggest problems with confidence.”

Robert Bloink, Esq., LL.M., and William H. Byrnes, Esq., LL.M., CWM®—are delivering real-life guidance based on decades of experience.  The authors’ knowledge and experience in tax law and practice provides the expert guidance for National Underwriter to once again deliver a valuable resource for the financial advising community,” added Rick Kravitz.

Anyone interested can try Tax Facts on Individuals & Small Businessrisk-free for 30 days, with a 100% guarantee of complete satisfaction.  For more information, please go to www.nationalunderwriter.com/TaxFactsIndividuals or call 1-800-543-0874.

For an indepth analysis of deductions for donations to U.S. charities (and the government’s policy encouraging or discouraging these donations), download my article at http://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=2304044

If you are interested in discussing the Master or Doctoral degree in the areas of financial services or international taxation, please contact me: profbyrnes@gmail.com to Google Hangout or Skype that I may take you on an “online tour” 

Posted in Taxation | Tagged: | Leave a Comment »

9 Tax Facts about Amending a Tax Return

Posted by William Byrnes on May 21, 2014


The IRS in Tax Tip 2014-51 alerted taxpayers to their ability to amend a tax return after it has already been filed with the IRS.  By example, if a taxpayer discovers that a mistake was made on the return, such as a mis-statement of income or inadvertent inclusion or exclusion of a deduction, the taxpayer can correct the mistake by filing an amended tax return.

9 tax facts that a taxpayer should know about filing an amended tax return include:

1. Use Form 1040X, Amended U.S. Individual Income Tax Return, to correct errors on a tax return.  But the amended return must be filed on paper.  Amended returns cannot be e-filed.

2. A taxpayer should file an amended tax return if there is an error claiming a filing status, income, deductions or credits on the original return.

3. However, a taxpayer normally will not need to file an amended return to correct simple math calculation errors on the return.  The IRS computers will find those math errors and automatically make those changes.  Such changes may effect the tax due or increase or decrease a refund.  Also, a taxpayer does not to file an amended return because of a forgotten tax form attachment, such as a W-2 or schedule. The IRS will normally later send a request for those to be sent separately.

4. A taxpayer normally has 3 years from the filing date of the original tax return to amend the tax return to claim a refund by filing Form 1040X . A taxpayer may file the amended return within two years from the date of paying the tax due, if that date is later than the filing date of the tax return.  Thus, generally the last day for most taxpayers to file a 2010 claim for a refund is April 15, 2014, unless a special exception applies.

5. If a taxpayer needs to amend more than one tax return, then a 1040X must be prepared for each year. Each 1040X form must be mailed in a separate envelope.  Note the tax year being amended on the top of Form 1040X.  Form 1040X’s instructions include the address where to mail the form.

6. If a taxpayer has other IRS forms or schedules that required changes, then attach them to the Form 1040X.

7. If a taxpayer is due an additional refund because of a potential amendment from the original return, then the taxpayer should wait to receive that first refund before filing Form 1040X to claim the additional refund.  Amended returns require as much as 12 weeks to process.

8. If a taxpayer ends up owing more tax, then file the Form 1040X and pay the tax as soon as possible. This will reduce any interest and penalties on that amount owing.

9. An amended tax return can be tracked three weeks after it is filed with the IRS tool: ‘Where’s My Amended Return?’ or by phone at 866-464-2050.  This tool can track the status of an amended return for the current year and up to three years back.  The ‘Where’s My Amended Return?’ tool requires a taxpayer identification number, normally the Social Security number, and the date of birth and zip code.

tax-facts-online_medium

Because of the constant changes to the tax law, taxpayers are currently facing many questions connected to important issues such as healthcare, home office use, capital gains, investments, and whether an individual is considered an employee or a contractor. Financial advisors are continually looking for updated tax information that can help them provide the right answers to the right people at the right time. For over 110 years, National Underwriter has provided fast, clear, and authoritative answers to financial advisors pressing questions, and it does so in the convenient, timesaving, Q&A format.

“Our brand-new Tax Facts title is exciting in many ways,” says Rick Kravitz, Vice President & Managing Director of Summit Professional Network’s Professional Publishing Division. “First of all, it fills a huge gap in the resources available to today’s advisors. Small business is a big market, and this book enables advisors to get up-and-running right away, with proven guidance that will help them serve their clients’ needs. Secondly, it addresses the biggest questions facing all taxpayers and provides absolutely reliable answers that help advisors solve today’s biggest problems with confidence.”

Robert Bloink, Esq., LL.M., and William H. Byrnes, Esq., LL.M., CWM®—are delivering real-life guidance based on decades of experience.  The authors’ knowledge and experience in tax law and practice provides the expert guidance for National Underwriter to once again deliver a valuable resource for the financial advising community,” added Rick Kravitz.

Anyone interested can try Tax Facts on Individuals & Small Business, risk-free for 30 days, with a 100% guarantee of complete satisfaction.  For more information, please go to www.nationalunderwriter.com/TaxFactsIndividuals or call 1-800-543-0874.

Posted in Taxation | Tagged: , , , | Leave a Comment »

6 Tax Facts for Making Required Estimated Tax Payments To Avoid Interests and Penalties

Posted by William Byrnes on May 19, 2014


In Tax Tip 2014-49, the IRS reminds taxpayers that tax must be paid throughout the year to avoid interest and penalties, that is, tax may not only be due on April 15 for some taxpayers. For the year 2014, tax may be due also on June 16, 2014, on Sept. 15 in 2014, on Jan. 15, 2015, and of course, also on Wednesday, April 15, 2015.

Who must make estimated tax payments?

Taxpayers that do not have taxes withheld from a paycheck, or who do not have enough tax withheld during the year, may need to make additional “estimated” tax payments during the year ‘to catch up’ if normal withholding was being applied.  This is especially true for self-employed taxpayers whose income is generally are not withheld upon.  A taxpayer filing as a sole proprietor, partner in a partnership, S corporation shareholder, and/or a self-employed individual, generally needs to make estimated tax payments during the year.  If a taxpayer had a tax liability for 2013, then normally the taxpayer will need to make estimated tax payments during 2014.

A corporation will generally need to make estimated tax payments if it expects to owe tax of $500 or more when it files its corporate tax return in 2015.

Why estimated tax payments?

Through estimated tax payments, government funds its activities throughout the year, keeps tabs on what is going on with the economy (are taxpayers earning more or less income than previous years) and also ensures tax payment compliance by limiting the amount of tax actually due April 15th for the previous years.  As infamous jurist and U.S. Supreme Court Justice Oliver Wendell Holmes is oft quoted: “Taxes are what we pay for civilized society…” (Compania General De Tabacos De Filipinas v. Collector of Internal Revenue, 275 U.S. 87, 100, dissenting; opinion (21 November 1927)).  Without estimated tax payments, many taxpayers on April 15 would find tax bills larger than the amount saved from which to pay them, be it that other personal spending priorities rise up during the year.

Tax penalty for not paying enough estimated tax?

If in 2014 a taxpayer does not pay enough estimated tax throughout the year, either through withholding or by making estimated tax payments, then a penalty for underpayment of estimated tax will be due on April 15, 2015.  Generally, most taxpayers will avoid this penalty if

EITHER owing less than $1,000 in tax after subtracting all tax withholdings by 3rd parties and after subtracting all tax credits the taxpayer claims for 2014,

OR if they paid at least 90% of the tax that turns out to be owed for 2014, or 100% of the tax shown on the return for 2013, whichever amount is smaller. 

6 tax tips for estimated taxes:

1. A Taxpayer must pay estimated taxes throughout 2014 if expecting to owe $1,000 or more when filing the federal tax return on April 15, 2015.  However, special rules apply to farmers and fishermen.

2. Estimate the amount of income expected to be received for the entire year 2014 to determine the amount of taxes that are estimated to be owed for 2014.  But also, take into account any tax deductions and credits that will be claimed.  Life changes during the year, such as a change in marital status or the birth of a child, can affect the estimated taxes owed.

3. Normally a taxpayer must make estimated tax payments four times a year. The 4 dates that apply to most people this year are April 15, 2014; June 16, 2014; and Sept. 15, 2014, then Jan. 15, 2015.

4. An estimated tax payment may be paid online or by telephone, by check or by money order, and even by credit or debit card.  If a taxpayer mails a tax payment to the IRS, then it is important to use a payment voucher that comes with Form 1040-ES, Estimated Tax for Individuals, that the tax payment may be credited correctly.  Remember that the IRS processes hundreds of millions of tax payments and forms each year!

5. Check out the electronic payment options.  The Electronic Filing Tax Payment System is a free and easy way to make payments electronically.

6. Use Form 1040-ES and its instructions to calculate estimated taxes.

tax-facts-online_medium

Due to a number of recent changes in the law, taxpayers are currently facing many questions connected to important issues such as healthcare, home office use, capital gains, investments, and whether an individual is considered an employee or a contractor. Financial advisors are continually looking for updated tax information that can help them provide the right answers to the right people at the right time. This brand-new resource provides fast, clear, and authoritative answers to pressing questions, and it does so in the convenient, timesaving, Q&A format for which Tax Facts is famous.

Our brand-new Tax Facts title is exciting in many ways,” says Rick Kravitz, Vice President & Managing Director of Summit Professional Network’s Professional Publishing Division. “First of all, it fills a huge gap in the resources available to today’s advisors. Small business is a big market, and this book enables advisors to get up-and-running right away, with proven guidance that will help them serve their clients’ needs. Secondly, it addresses the biggest questions facing all taxpayers and provides absolutely reliable answers that help advisors solve today’s biggest problems with confidence.”

Robert Bloink, Esq., LL.M., and William H. Byrnes, Esq., LL.M., CWM®—are delivering real-life guidance based on decades of experience.  The authors’ knowledge and experience in tax law and practice provides the expert guidance for National Underwriter to once again deliver a valuable resource for the financial advising community,” added Rick Kravitz.

Anyone interested can try Tax Facts on Individuals & Small Businessrisk-free for 30 days, with a 100% guarantee of complete satisfaction.  For more information, please go to www.nationalunderwriter.com/TaxFactsIndividuals or call 1-800-543-0874.

For an indepth analysis of deductions for donations to U.S. charities (and the government’s policy encouraging or discouraging these donations), download my article at http://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=2304044

If you are interested in discussing the Master or Doctoral degree in the areas of financial services or international taxation, please contact me: profbyrnes@gmail.com to Google Hangout or Skype that I may take you on an “online tour”

Posted in Taxation | Tagged: , | 1 Comment »

Is Your Child Required to File a Tax Return?

Posted by William Byrnes on May 16, 2014


2014_tf_on_investments-mChildren are potential taxpayers too!  That is the message from the IRS in Tax Tip 2014-38.  A child may be required to a federal tax return, or if a child can not file his or her own return, then the parent or guardian is normally responsible for filing their tax return.

Here are 4 tax facts from the IRS that about a child’s investment income:

1. Investment income normally includes interest, dividends and capital gains. It also includes other unearned income, such as from a trust.

2. Special rules apply if a child’s total investment income is more than $2,000. The parent’s tax rate may apply to part of that income instead of the child’s (lower) tax rate.

3. If a child’s total interest and dividend income was less than $10,000 in 2013, the taxpayer may be able to include the income on the taxpayer’s tax return. If the taxpayer elects this choice, the child does not then file a return. See Form 8814, Parents’ Election to Report Child’s Interest and Dividends.

4. Children whose investment income was $10,000 or more in 2013 must file their own tax return. File Form 8615, Tax for Certain Children Who Have Investment Income, along with the child’s federal tax return.

Starting in 2013, a child whose tax is figured on Form 8615 may be subject to the Net Investment Income Tax. NIIT is a 3.8% tax on the lesser of either net investment income or the excess of the child’s modified adjusted gross income that is over a threshold amount. Use Form 8960, Net Investment Income Tax, to calculate this tax.

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How Will The Lifetime Learning Credit Help Pay My Higher Education Tuition?

Posted by William Byrnes on May 15, 2014


The IRS’ Tax Tip 2014-41 answers this question, in conjunction with its > online publication < .

The Lifetime Learning Credit is:

  • Limited to $2,000 per tax return, per year.
  • For all years of higher education, including classes for learning or improving job skills.
  • Limited to the amount of the tax due for that year.
  • For the cost of tuition and required fees, plus books, supplies and equipment.
  • The taxpayer’s school should provide a Form 1098-T, Tuition Statement, showing expenses for the year.
  • File Form 8863, Education Credits, to claim these credits on the tax return.
  • The credit is subject to income limits that could reduce the credit amount.
Maximum credit Up to $2,000 credit per return
Limit on modified adjusted gross income (MAGI) $127,000 if married filling jointly;
$63,000 if single, head of household, or qualifying widow(er)
Refundable or nonrefundable Nonrefundable—credit limited to the amount of tax you must pay on your taxable income
Number of years of postsecondary education Available for all years of postsecondary education and for courses to acquire or improve job skills
Number of tax years credit available Available for an unlimited number of years
Type of program required Student does not need to be pursuing a program leading to a degree or other recognized education credential
Number of courses Available for one or more courses
Felony drug conviction Felony drug convictions do not make the student ineligible
Qualified expenses Tuition and fees required for enrollment or attendance (including amounts required to be paid to the institution for course-related books, supplies, and equipment)
Payments for academic periods Payments made in 2014 for academic periods beginning in 2014 or beginning in the first 3 months of 2015

 

How does a tax credit work?

A tax credit reduces the amount of income tax a taxpayer may have to pay. Unlike a deduction, which reduces the amount of income subject to tax, a credit directly reduces the tax itself. The lifetime learning credit is a nonrefundable credit. This means that it can reduce tax owed to zero, but if the credit is more than the tax owing then the excess will not be refunded.

Effect of the Amount of Your Income on the Amount of Your Credit

The amount of the lifetime learning credit is phased out (gradually reduced) if MAGI is between $53,000 and $63,000 ($107,000 and $127,000 if you file a joint return). For 2013, by example, a taxpayer cannot claim a lifetime learning credit if MAGI is $63,000 or more ($127,000 or more if a joint tax return).
   For most taxpayers, MAGI is adjusted gross income (AGI) as figured on the federal income tax return.  MAGI is the AGI on line 38 of the 1040 form, modified by adding back any:

  1. Foreign earned income exclusion,
  2. Foreign housing exclusion,
  3. Foreign housing deduction,
  4. Exclusion of income by bona fide residents of American Samoa, and
  5. Exclusion of income by bona fide residents of Puerto Rico.

For an indepth analysis of deductions for donations to U.S. charities (and the government’s policy encouraging or discouraging these donations), download my article at http://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=2304044

If you are interested in discussing the Master or Doctoral degree in the areas of financial services or international taxation, please contact me profbyrnes@gmail.com to Google Hangout or Skype that I may take you on an “online tour” 

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7 Tax Facts on Deducting Charitable Contributions to a Charity

Posted by William Byrnes on May 9, 2014


2014_tf_on_individuals_small_businesses-m_1In its Tax Tip 2014-39, the IRS disclosed that a taxpayer looking for a tax deduction may donate to a charity and create a ‘win-win’ situation.  The IRS stated that it is good for the charity and good for the taxpayer.  (subscribe by email on the left menu to these daily tax articles)

7 tax tips to know about deducting gifts to charity

1. A taxpayer must donate to a qualified charity if the taxpayer wants to deduct the gift.  Importantly, a taxpayer can not deduct gifts to individuals, political organizations or candidates.  Search the >online IRS database< for the charity.  If it is on the list, then it is qualified.

2. In order for a taxpayer to deduct contributions, the taxpayer must file Form 1040 and itemize deductions. File Schedule A, Itemized Deductions, with the federal tax return.

3. If a taxpayer receives a benefit in return for the contribution, the deduction will be limited.  A taxpayer can only deduct the amount of the gift that is more than the value of what the taxpayer received in return.  Examples of such benefits include merchandise, meals, tickets to an event or other goods and services in exchange for a donation.

4. If a taxpayer donates property instead of cash, the deduction is usually that item’s fair market value. Fair market value is generally the price the taxpayer would receive if the taxpayer sold the property on the open market.  A taxpayer must file Form 8283, Noncash Charitable Contributions, if the deduction for all noncash gifts is more than $500 for the year.

5. Used clothing and household items generally must be in good condition to be deductible. Special rules apply to >vehicle donations<.

6. A taxpayer must keep records to prove the amount of the contributions made during the year. The kind of records that must be kept depends on the amount and type of the donation. For example, a taxpayer must keep a written record of any cash donation, regardless of the amount, in order to claim a deduction.  It can be a cancelled check, a letter from the organization, or a bank or payroll statement.  It should include the name of the charity, the date and the amount donated. A cell phone bill meets this requirement for text donations if it shows this same information.

7. To claim a deduction for donated cash or property of $250 or more, a taxpayer must have a written statement from the organization. It must show the amount of the donation and a description of any property given. It must also say whether the organization provided any goods or services in exchange for the gift.

For an indepth analysis of deductions for donations to U.S. charities (and the government’s policy encouraging or discouraging these donations), download my article at http://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=2304044

If you are interested in discussing applying for the Master or Doctoral degree in the areas of financial planning or taxation, please contact me: profbyrnes@gmail.com to Google Hangout or Skype that I may take you on an “online tour” 

 

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Do I Owe an Obama Care “Individual Shared Responsibility Payment” with my next tax return?

Posted by William Byrnes on April 30, 2014


The IRS, in its Health Care Tax Tip 2014-04, addressed the question of whether a taxpayer owes an Obama Care Tax Penalty (or “Fee” or as it is formally known an “Individual Shared Responsibility Payment”) to be paid with the 2014 tax return filed by April 15, 2015.  What ever it is referred to, being a penalty, a fee, or a payment, it is mandatory and was fairly imposed by Congress, with a supra majority Senate vote.  

So … the question is: Do I owe it?  And if so, how much do I owe? 

The short answer is that for any month in 2014 that a taxpayer or any of a taxpayer’s dependents do n0t maintain health care coverage and do not qualify for an exemption from having health care coverage, then the taxpayer will owe an “individual shared responsibility payment” with your 2014 tax return filed in 2015 (exemption is the same as exception, and in tax it is said that there is always an exception to a rule, and an exception to the exception).  

What is the “less than three-month gap” exemption / exception?

The exception is if a taxpayer went without health care coverage for less than three consecutive months during the year, then the taxpayer may qualify for the short coverage gap exemption and will not have to make a payment for those months. However, if a taxpayer has more than one short coverage gap during a year, the short coverage gap exemption only applies to the first.  So by example, the taxpayer has health care coverage January 1, 2014 until February 28, and May 1 until August 30, and then again from November 15 through December 31, 2014.  The first health care coverage gap that falls within the exception is March 1 until April 30 because it is less than three consecutive months.  The second gap in coverage is also less than three consecutive months, being September 1 through November 15 – but the exception has already been used for the year so it does not fall within it.

How much does a taxpayer owe?

If a taxpayer (or any dependents) do not maintain health care coverage and do not qualify for an exemption, then the taxpayer must make an individual shared responsibility payment with the 2014 tax return.  In general, this health care coverage penalty is either a percentage of the taxpayer’s income or a flat dollar amount, whichever is greater.  High income taxpayers will pay a higher penalty.  A taxpayer will owe 1/12th of this penalty for each month of the taxpayer or taxpayer’s dependents gap in coverage.  The annual payment amount for 2014 is the greater of:

  • one percent (1%) of the household income that is above the tax return threshold for the taxpayer’s filing status, such as Married Filing Jointly or single, or
  • a family’s flat dollar amount, which is $95 per adult and $47.50 per child, limited to a maximum of $285.

This individual shared responsibility payment is capped at the cost of the national average premium for the bronze level health plan available through the Marketplace in 2014.  The taxpayer will pay the due amount with the 2014 federal income tax return filed in 2015.  For example, a single adult under age 65 with household income less than $19,650 (but more than $10,150) would pay the $95 flat rate.  However, a single adult under age 65 with household income greater than $19,650 would pay an annual payment based on the one percent rate.  

Why greater than $19,650?  The filing threshold for a single adult in 2014 is 10,150, subtract that from $19,650, leaving a base amount of $9, 500.  Multiply 1% to that base amount and the penalty is $95, the same as the flat rate.

So, from the beginning of this year (January 1, 2014) a taxpayer and the family must either have “qualifying” health insurance coverage throughout the year, qualify for an exemption from coverage, or make the above payment when filing the 2014 federal income tax return in 2015.

What qualifies as “qualifying health insurance coverage”?

Qualifying coverage includes coverage provided by an employer, health insurance purchased in the Health Insurance Marketplace, most government-sponsored coverage, and coverage purchased directly from an insurance company.  However, qualifying coverage does not include coverage that may provide limited benefits, such as coverage only for vision care or dental care, workers’ compensation, or coverage that only covers a specific disease or condition.

What are the exemptions to obtaining or maintaining required health care coverage?

A taxpayer may be exempt from the requirement to maintain qualified coverage if:

  • Have no affordable coverage options because the minimum amount a taxpayer must pay for the annual premiums is more than eight percent (8%) of household income,
  • Have a gap in coverage for less than three consecutive months (see abo0ve), or
  • Qualify for an exemption for one of several other reasons, including having a hardship that prevents the taxpayer from obtaining coverage, or belonging to a group explicitly exempt from the requirement.
  • A special hardship exemption applies to taxpayers who purchase their insurance through the Marketplace during the initial enrollment period for 2014 but due to the enrollment process have a coverage gap at the beginning of 2014.

tax-facts-online_medium

Due to a number of recent changes in the law, taxpayers are currently facing many questions connected to important issues such as healthcare, home office use, capital gains, investments, and whether an individual is considered an employee or a contractor. Financial advisors are continually looking for updated tax information that can help them provide the right answers to the right people at the right time. This brand-new resource provides fast, clear, and authoritative answers to pressing questions, and it does so in the convenient, timesaving, Q&A format for which Tax Facts is famous.

Our brand-new Tax Facts title is exciting in many ways,” says Rick Kravitz, Vice President & Managing Director of Summit Professional Network’s Professional Publishing Division. “First of all, it fills a huge gap in the resources available to today’s advisors. Small business is a big market, and this book enables advisors to get up-and-running right away, with proven guidance that will help them serve their clients’ needs. Secondly, it addresses the biggest questions facing all taxpayers and provides absolutely reliable answers that help advisors solve today’s biggest problems with confidence.”

Robert Bloink, Esq., LL.M., and William H. Byrnes, Esq., LL.M., CWM®—are delivering real-life guidance based on decades of experience.  The authors’ knowledge and experience in tax law and practice provides the expert guidance for National Underwriter to once again deliver a valuable resource for the financial advising community,” added Rick Kravitz.

Anyone interested can try Tax Facts on Individuals & Small Business, risk-free for 30 days, with a 100% guarantee of complete satisfaction.  For more information, please go to www.nationalunderwriter.com/TaxFactsIndividuals or call 1-800-543-0874.

 

If you are interested in discussing the Master or Doctorate degree in the areas of financial services or international taxation, please contact me https://profwilliambyrnes.com/online-tax-degree/

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IRS Reports 131 Million Tax Returns Filed but Many Amended Returns Expected

Posted by William Byrnes on April 29, 2014


The IRS reported in its 2014-56 NewsWire that 131 million tax returns were filed by the deadline of April 15 for the tax year of 2013.  88% of these tax returns were e-filed of which 35% (almost 46 million returns) were filed by taxpayers from home computers.

But the IRS disclosed that it expects nearly 5 million of these taxpayers to file amendments to their returns by filing Form 1040X during 2014.  Generally, for a credit or refund, taxpayers must file Form 1040X within 3 years, including extensions, after the date they filed their original return or within 2 years after the date they paid the tax, whichever is later. For most people, this means that returns for tax-year 2011 or later can still be amended.

Thus far, the IRS has released 94,809,000 refunds averaging $2,686 each.  In all, the IRS has had to return almost $255 billion to taxpayers in the form of refunds of access tax withholdings.

Same Sex Couples Amending Returns

The IRS alerted same-sex couples to consider filing amended returns for past years.  A same sex couple, legally married in a state or foreign country that recognizes their marriage, is now considered married for tax purposes. This is true regardless of whether or not the couple lives in a jurisdiction that recognizes same-sex marriage.

For returns originally filed before Sept. 16, 2013, legally married same sex couples have the option of filing amended return to change their filing status to married filing separately or married filing jointly. But they are not required to change their filing status on a prior return, even if they amend that return for another reason. In either case, their amended return must be consistent with the filing status they have chosen.

If a taxpayer still owes tax for the year 2013, then read https://profwilliambyrnes.com/2014/04/15/4-tax-tips-if-you-cant-pay-the-full-amount-of-taxes-on-time/

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6 Tax Facts for Self-Employed Taxpayers

Posted by William Byrnes on April 23, 2014


In Tax Tip 2014-34, the IRS provided 6 tax tips for self employed taxpayers.

  1. Self-employment income includes income received for part-time work.  This is in addition to income from a regular job.
  2. A self employed taxpayer must file a Schedule C, Profit or Loss from Business, or Schedule C-EZ, Net Profit from Business, with your Form 1040.
  3. A self employed taxpayer may have to pay self-employment tax as well as income tax if a profit was earned.  Self-employment tax includes Social Security and Medicare taxes. Use Schedule SE, Self-Employment Tax, to calculate whether any self employment tax is due.
  4. A self employed taxpayer may need to make estimated tax payments. Taxpayers typically make these payments on income that is not subject to withholding.  A taxpayer may be charged a penalty if not paying enough estimated taxes throughout the entire year.
  5. A self employed taxpayer can deduct some expenses paid to run your trade or business. A self employed taxpayer can deduct most business expenses in full, but some must be ’capitalized.’  Capitalization means that the deduction will be limited to just a portion of the expense each year over a period of years.  By example, only the first $5,000 of the “start-up” expenses for a new business of the taxpayer is potentially deductible, and not until the year in which the active trade or business begins.  All other start up expenses must be amortized over a 180-month period, beginning with the month the business starts.  Thus, start up expenses in general are only deductible over this 180 month period, and not in the year actually incurred.
  6. A self employed taxpayer can deduct business expenses only if the expenses are both ordinary and necessary.  An ordinary expense is one that is common and accepted in an industry.  A necessary expense is one that is helpful and proper for the trade or business.

tax-facts-online_medium

Due to a number of recent changes in the law, taxpayers are currently facing many questions connected to important issues such as healthcare, home office use, capital gains, investments, and whether an individual is considered an employee or a contractor. Financial advisors are continually looking for updated tax information that can help them provide the right answers to the right people at the right time. This brand-new resource provides fast, clear, and authoritative answers to pressing questions, and it does so in the convenient, timesaving, Q&A format for which Tax Facts is famous.

“Our brand-new Tax Facts title is exciting in many ways,” says Rick Kravitz, Vice President & Managing Director of Summit Professional Network’s Professional Publishing Division. “First of all, it fills a huge gap in the resources available to today’s advisors. Small business is a big market, and this book enables advisors to get up-and-running right away, with proven guidance that will help them serve their clients’ needs. Secondly, it addresses the biggest questions facing all taxpayers and provides absolutely reliable answers that help advisors solve today’s biggest problems with confidence.”

Robert Bloink, Esq., LL.M., and William H. Byrnes, Esq., LL.M., CWM®—are delivering real-life guidance based on decades of experience.  The authors’ knowledge and experience in tax law and practice provides the expert guidance for National Underwriter to once again deliver a valuable resource for the financial advising community,” added Rick Kravitz.

Anyone interested can try Tax Facts on Individuals & Small Business, risk-free for 30 days, with a 100% guarantee of complete satisfaction.  For more information, please go to www.nationalunderwriter.com/TaxFactsIndividuals or call 1-800-543-0874.

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Court Approves New Planning Techniques for Investment Income Tax Trap for Trusts

Posted by William Byrnes on April 22, 2014


The Tax Court recently handed down a decision that could prove to be just the break that trusts participating in business activities need to escape liability for the new 3.8 percent tax on investment-type income (the NIIT) enacted with the ACA / ObamaCare.

Many trusts with business-related income are finally feeling the sting of the tax, which applied to all trust investment income for trusts with income in excess of a low $11,950 in 2013 ($12,150 for 2014).* The decision paves the way for new planning techniques in 2014 and beyond …

Read about the new planning techniques for the new investment tax: https://www.lifehealthpro.com/2014/04/21/court-untangles-investment-income-tax-trap-for-tru

Also see previous planning analysis at https://profwilliambyrnes.com/2014/01/02/irs-gives-high-income-taxpayers-a-break-on-new-3-8-tax/

See also: 10 things to know about how investments are taxed

* Estates and trusts are subject to the Net Investment Income Tax if they have undistributed Net Investment Income and also have adjusted gross income over the dollar amount at which the highest tax bracket for an estate or trust begins for such taxable year under section 1(e) (for tax year 2013, this threshold amount is $11,950). For 2014, the threshold amount is $12,150.

<— Subscribe to this blog on the left side menu for unique weekly tax planning articles and tax facts tips

 

 

 

Posted in Retirement Planning, Taxation, Wealth Management | Tagged: , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

What are Five Tax Credits That May Reduce Your Taxes?

Posted by William Byrnes on April 16, 2014


In Tax Tip 2014-33, the IRS revealed five tax credits that may reduce a taxpayers taxes.  Some tax credits are refundable regardless of whether the taxpayer owes any tax for the year, the IRS pointed out.

1. The Earned Income Tax Credit is a refundable credit for taxpayers who work but do not earn a lot of money.  For 2013, the EITC may have increased the tax refund by as much as $6,044.  

2. The Child and Dependent Care Credit can help a taxpayer offset the cost of daycare or day camp for children under age 13, and even the costs paid to care for a disabled spouse or dependent.

3. The Child Tax Credit can reduce a taxpayer’s taxes by as much as $1,000 for each qualified child claimed on the tax return.

4. The Saver’s Credit helps workers save for retirement. For 2013, a taxpayer may have qualified if income was $59,000 or less and the taxpayer contributed to an IRA or a retirement plan at work.

5. The American Opportunity Tax Credit can offset college costs. The credit is available for four years of post-secondary education. It’s worth up to $2,500 per eligible student enrolled at least half time for at least one academic period.

tax-facts-online_medium

 

 “Robert Bloink, Esq., LL.M., and William H. Byrnes, Esq., LL.M., CWM®—are delivering real-life guidance based on decades of experience.”

The authors’ knowledge and experience in tax law and practice provides the expert guidance for National Underwriter to once again deliver a valuable resource for the financial advising community,” added Rick Kravitz.

Anyone interested can try Tax Facts on Individuals & Small Business, risk-free for 30 days, with a 100% guarantee of complete satisfaction.  For more information, please go to www.nationalunderwriter.com/TaxFactsIndividuals or call 1-800-543-0874.

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6 Tax Facts About Filing The Tax Return Today (April 15) and What To Do If You Can’t Pay the Full Amount of Taxes

Posted by William Byrnes on April 15, 2014


The IRS Tax Tip 2014-53 provided a series of Tax Facts of what to do if a taxpayer cannot pay the full amount of taxes owed, which I have supplemented with a couple Tax Facts from the U.S. Post Office.

1. File the Tax Return on Time to Avoid Late Filing Penalty.  File on time to avoid a late filing penalty.  By mailing or electronically filing the tax return with the postmark before or on Wednesday April 15, a taxpayer will avoid the late-filing penalty, normally 5% per month based on the unpaid balance, that applies to returns filed after the deadline.

2. Can’t File the Tax Return Today? Then File an Extension until October 15!  A taxpayer can use IRS Free File to e-file Form 4868 (PDF) Application For Automatic Extension of Time To File U.S. Individual Tax Return. The extension request must be filed by midnight on April 15.  E-filed extension request will receive an IRS receipt.  A taxpayer may still mail the request for an extension Form 4868, as long at the postmark is before or on April 15.

3. Mail must be Postmarked before or on April 15!  Gone are the days that the post office accepts a 11.59 pm tax return and tax extension letter, postmarking it by midnight April 15.  Thus, the taxpayer must drop off at the post office or post office approved provider before the last pick up time of April 15 to ensure a postmark of April 15.  See https://tools.usps.com/go/POLocatorAction!input.action for the closest post office or post service drop off approved provider within a zip code.

4. Pay as Much of the Tax Due as Possible to Avoid Interest and Late Payment Penalties. In addition, any payment made with an extension request will reduce or eliminate interest and late-payment penalties that apply to payments made after April 15.  The interest rate is currently 3% per year, compounded daily, and the late-payment penalty is normally 0.5 % per month.  Pay as much as possible to reduce interest charges and a late payment penalty.

5. Use a Credit Card to Pay the Tax. The interest and fees charged by a bank or credit card company may be less than IRS interest and penalties. See credit card options

6. Use the Online Payment Agreement tool.  Ask for a payment plan before the IRS sends a bill.  The best way is to use the Online Payment Agreement tool.  File Form 9465, Installment Agreement Request, with the tax return.

tax-facts-online_medium

Because of the constant changes to the tax law, taxpayers are currently facing many questions connected to important issues such as healthcare, home office use, capital gains, investments, and whether an individual is considered an employee or a contractor. Financial advisors are continually looking for updated tax information that can help them provide the right answers to the right people at the right time. For over 110 years, National Underwriter has provided fast, clear, and authoritative answers to financial advisors pressing questions, and it does so in the convenient, timesaving, Q&A format.

“Our brand-new Tax Facts title is exciting in many ways,” says Rick Kravitz, Vice President & Managing Director of Summit Professional Network’s Professional Publishing Division. “First of all, it fills a huge gap in the resources available to today’s advisors. Small business is a big market, and this book enables advisors to get up-and-running right away, with proven guidance that will help them serve their clients’ needs. Secondly, it addresses the biggest questions facing all taxpayers and provides absolutely reliable answers that help advisors solve today’s biggest problems with confidence.”

Robert Bloink, Esq., LL.M., and William H. Byrnes, Esq., LL.M., CWM®—are delivering real-life guidance based on decades of experience.  The authors’ knowledge and experience in tax law and practice provides the expert guidance for National Underwriter to once again deliver a valuable resource for the financial advising community,” added Rick Kravitz.

Anyone interested can try Tax Facts on Individuals & Small Business, risk-free for 30 days, with a 100% guarantee of complete satisfaction.  For more information, please go to www.nationalunderwriter.com/TaxFactsIndividuals or call 1-800-543-0874.

Posted in Taxation | Tagged: , , , , , | 1 Comment »

Only 2 days left to file a tax return? 5 tax tips for request an extension until October 15

Posted by William Byrnes on April 13, 2014


In Tax Tip 2014-52, the IRS provided the elements of possible relief for taxpayers that now realize – only 2 days left to file a tax return.  File an extension to file the tax return instead, allowing the taxpayer 6 months breathing room until October 15, 2014, to file the return.

What a Taxpayer Should Know to Request More Time to File a Tax Return!

A taxpayer can electronically file Form 4868 (PDF), Application For Automatic Extension of Time To File U.S. Individual Tax Return; and (2) pay all or part of your estimated income tax due using a credit or debit card or by using the Electronic Federal Tax Payment System (EFTPS).  However, a taxpayer can still file a paper Form 4868 by mail.  Filing this form gives taxpayers until Oct. 15 to file a return. To get the extension, taxpayers must estimate their tax liability on this form and should also pay any amount due.

By properly filing this form, a taxpayer will avoid the late-filing penalty, normally 5% per month based on the unpaid balance, that applies to returns filed after the deadline.  In addition, any payment made with an extension request will reduce or eliminate interest and late-payment penalties that apply to payments made after April 15.  The interest rate is currently 3% per year, compounded daily, and the late-payment penalty is normally 0.5 % per month.

5 tax tips for filing an extension

1. A taxpayer should file on time even if unable to pay the tax due.  If a taxpayer completes a tax return but can not pay the taxes owed, do not request an extension.  Instead, the taxpayer should file the tax return on time and pay as much as possible to reduce the amount owed.  At least the taxpayer will avoid the hefty late filing penalty, which is much higher than the penalty for not paying all of the taxes owed on time.

2. Use IRS Free File to request an extension.  A taxpayer can use IRS Free File to e-file Form 4868 (PDF) Application For Automatic Extension of Time To File U.S. Individual Tax Return. The extension request must be filed by midnight on April 15.  E-filed extension request will receive an IRS receipt.

3. Mail Form 4868.  A taxpayer may still mail the request for an extension Form 4868.  The envelope must be postmarked at the post office by April 15.  The safest way to guarantee such a postmark is to bring the envelope to the post office counter during office hours.

4. Extra time to file is not extra time to pay.  An extension to file will allow six additional months to file a tax return, until Oct. 15.  However, it does not provide extra time to pay the tax due by April 15.  Thus, a taxpayer must estimate and pay the tax owed by or on April 15.  Any amount not paid by April 15 will be charged interest. Moreover, the IRS may levy a penalty for not paying the tax on time.

5. Payment Options Moreover, a taxpayer can use payment options.  Apply for a payment plan using the Online Payment Agreement tool.  Or a taxpayer can file Form 9465, Installment Agreement Request, with a tax return. If a taxpayer is unable to make payments because of a financial hardship, the IRS will work on a payment plan with the taxpayer.

2014_tf_on_individuals_small_businesses-m_1For over 110 years, National Underwriter has provided fast, clear, and authoritative answers to financial advisors pressing questions, and it does so in the convenient, timesaving, Q&A format.  “Our brand-new Tax Facts title is exciting in many ways,” says Rick Kravitz, Vice President & Managing Director. “First of all, it fills a huge gap in the resources available to today’s advisors. Small business is a big market, and this book enables advisors to get up-and-running right away, with proven guidance that will help them serve their clients’ needs. Secondly, it addresses the biggest questions facing all taxpayers and provides absolutely reliable answers that help advisors solve today’s biggest problems with confidence.”

Robert Bloink, Esq., LL.M., and William H. Byrnes, Esq., LL.M., CWM®—are delivering real-life guidance based on decades of experience.  The authors’ knowledge and experience in tax law and practice provides the expert guidance for National Underwriter to once again deliver a valuable resource for the financial advising community,” added Rick Kravitz.

Anyone interested can try Tax Facts on Individuals & Small Business, risk-free for 30 days, with a 100% guarantee of complete satisfaction.  For more information, please go to www.nationalunderwriter.com/TaxFactsIndividuals or call 1-800-543-0874.

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Tax Tips for U.S. Taxpayers with Foreign Income in 2013

Posted by William Byrnes on April 12, 2014


If a taxpayer is a U.S. citizen or resident, then the taxpayer must report income from all sources within and outside of the U.S.  The rules for filing income tax returns are generally the same whether the taxpayer is living in the U.S. or abroad. Here are seven tips from the IRS from Tax Tips 2014-43 that U.S. taxpayers with foreign income should know:

1. Report Worldwide Income.  By law, U.S. citizens and resident aliens must report their worldwide income. This includes income from foreign trusts, and foreign bank and securities accounts.

2. File Required Tax Forms.  The taxpayer may need to file Schedule B, Interest and Ordinary Dividends, with the U.S. tax return.  The taxpayer may also need to file Form 8938, Statement of Specified Foreign Financial Assets. In some cases, the taxpayer may need to file FinCEN Form 114, Report of Foreign Bank and Financial Accounts..

3. Consider the Automatic Extension.  If a taxpayer is living abroad and can’t file a tax return by the April 15 deadline, then the taxpayer may qualify for an automatic two-month filing extension. The taxpayer then will have until June 16, 2014 to file a U.S. income tax return. This extension also applies to those serving in the military outside the U.S. The taxpayer must attach a statement to the tax return to explain why the taxpayer qualifies for the extension.

4. Review the Foreign Earned Income Exclusion.  If a taxpayer lives and work abroad, then the taxpayer may be able to claim the foreign earned income exclusion. If the taxpayer qualifies, then the taxpayer will not pay tax on up to $97,600 of wages and other foreign earned income in 2013. See Form 2555, Foreign Earned Income, or Form 2555-EZ, Foreign Earned Income Exclusion, for more details.

5. Don’t Overlook Credits and Deductions.  A taxpayer may be able to take avtax credit or a deduction for income taxes paid to a foreign country. These benefits can reduce the amount of taxes that the taxpayer must pay if both countries tax the same income.

You can get more on this topic in Publication 54, Tax Guide for U.S. Citizens and Resident Aliens Abroad.

2014_tf_on_individuals_small_businesses-m_1Due to a number of recent changes in the law, taxpayers are currently facing many questions connected to important issues such as healthcare, home office use, capital gains, investments, and whether an individual is considered an employee or a contractor. Financial advisors are continually looking for updated tax information that can help them provide the right answers to the right people at the right time. This brand-new resource provides fast, clear, and authoritative answers to pressing questions, and it does so in the convenient, timesaving, Q&A format for which Tax Facts is famous.

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8 Things to be Aware of for Deducting Medical and Dental Expenses for 2013 !

Posted by William Byrnes on April 11, 2014


IRS Tax Tip 2014-21 points out that if a taxpayer intends to claim a deduction for medical expenses, there are new rules that apply that may affect these deductions for 2013.  The IRS listed eight things that a taxpayer should be aware of about the medical and dental expense deduction:

1. AGI threshold increase.  Starting in 2013, the amount of allowable medical expenses must exceed 10% of adjusted gross income (AGI) to be able to claim this deduction. The threshold was 7.5% of AGI in prior years.

2. Temporary exception for age 65.  The AGI threshold is still 7.5% of AGI if the taxpayer or spouse is age 65 or older.  This exception will apply through Dec. 31, 2016.

3. Must itemize.  To claim medical and dental expenses the taxpayer must itemize deductions on the federal tax return.  Thus, if a taxpayer claims the standard deduction, then no deduction for medical expenses.

4. Paid in 2013. You can include only the expenses you paid in 2013. If you paid by check, the day you mailed or delivered the check is usually considered the date of payment.

5. Costs to include.  A taxpayer can include most medical or dental costs that paid for that taxpayer, the spouse and the dependents.  Some exceptions and special rules apply. Any costs reimbursed by insurance or other sources don’t qualify for a deduction.

6. Expenses that qualify.  The costs of diagnosing, treating, easing or preventing disease. The cost of insurance premiums for medical care, as does the cost of some long-term care insurance.  The cost of prescription drugs and insulin also qualify.  For more examples of costs you can deduct, see IRS Publication 502, Medical and Dental Expenses.

7. Travel costs count.  A taxpayer may be able to claim the cost of travel for medical care. This includes costs such as public transportation, ambulance service, tolls and parking fees.  For the use of a car, it may be possible to deduct either the actual costs or the standard mileage rate for medical travel. The rate is 24 cents per mile for 2013.

8. No double benefit.  A taxpayer can’t claim a tax deduction for medical and dental expenses paid with funds from a Health Savings Accounts or Flexible Spending Arrangements. Amounts paid with funds from those plans are usually tax-free – the salary used to fund these accounts is usually not included in taxable income.

For more than half a century, Tax Facts has been an essential resource designed to meet the real-world tax-guidance needs of professionals in both the insurance and investment industries.

2014_tf_on_individuals_small_businesses-m_1Due to a number of recent changes in the law, taxpayers are currently facing many questions connected to important issues such as healthcare, home office use, capital gains, investments, and whether an individual is considered an employee or a contractor. Financial advisors are continually looking for updated tax information that can help them provide the right answers to the right people at the right time. This brand-new resource provides fast, clear, and authoritative answers to pressing questions, and it does so in the convenient, timesaving, Q&A format for which Tax Facts is famous.

“Our brand-new Tax Facts title is exciting in many ways,” says Rick Kravitz, Vice President & Managing Director of Summit Professional Network’s Professional Publishing Division. “First of all, it fills a huge gap in the resources available to today’s advisors. Small business is a big market, and this book enables advisors to get up-and-running right away, with proven guidance that will help them serve their clients’ needs. Secondly, it addresses the biggest questions facing all taxpayers and provides absolutely reliable answers that help advisors solve today’s biggest problems with confidence.”

tax-facts-online_mediumThe company also points out that the expert authors—Robert Bloink, Esq., LL.M., and William H. Byrnes, Esq., LL.M., CWM®—are delivering real-life guidance based on decades of experience.

The authors’ knowledge and experience in tax law and practice provides the expert guidance for National Underwriter to once again deliver a valuable resource for the financial advising community,” added Kravitz.

Anyone interested can try Tax Facts on Individuals & Small Business, risk-free for 30 days, with a 100% guarantee of complete satisfaction.  For more information, please go to www.nationalunderwriter.com/TaxFactsIndividuals or call 1-800-543-0874.  Use coupon code Tax15 and Save 15%!

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Foreign Housing Allowance for United States Government Employees – Taxable or Non-taxable?

Posted by William Byrnes on April 10, 2014


EDN PhotoThe gross income of United States citizens and resident aliens is taxable on a worldwide basis.  In most cases, compensation for personal services such as employer payments for housing expenses is fully taxable as an employee fringe benefit unless specifically excluded from taxation.  But there are exceptions to the taxation of housing allowances such as the special rules for members of the clergy or Peace Corps volunteers.

Qualified individuals may either exclude or deduct foreign housing expenses if they have incurred housing expenses while living and working aboard. Foreign housing allowances paid to United States Government employees are treated as reimbursements for actual housing expenses and, therefore, not subject to taxation.

Link to Edward Nieto’s full analysis in his article Foreign Housing Allowance for United States Government Employees – Taxable or Non-taxable? on AdvisorFYI

Edward Nieto is a U.S. Government civilian working in Germany as a business advisor.  He has over 25 years of combined military, government, and defense industry experience.  He has also worked as a VITA tax advisor in support of military and government personnel overseas.  He may be contacted at edn2000@outlook.com

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Must a taxpayer report the value of his/her employer-sponsored health insurance coverage included on the W2?

Posted by William Byrnes on April 10, 2014


In its Health Care Tax Tip 2014-09, the IRS answered the question:  Must a taxpayer report on the income tax return (form 1040) the value of his/her employer-sponsored health insurance coverage?  The employer has included the cost of the employer-sponsored health insurance coverage on an employee’s W-2, Wage and Tax Statement.  What must a taxpayer do with this information?

The Affordable Care Act requires employers to report the cost of coverage under an employer-sponsored group health plan. Reporting the cost of health care coverage on the Form W-2 does not mean that the coverage is taxable. The value of the employer’s excludable contribution to health coverage continues to be excludable from an employee’s income, and it is not taxable. This reporting is for informational purposes only and will provide employees useful and comparable consumer information on the cost of their health care coverage.

Employers that provide “applicable employer-sponsored coverage” under a group health plan are subject to the reporting requirement. This includes businesses, tax-exempt organizations, and federal, state and local government entities (except with respect to plans maintained primarily for members of the military and their families). However, federally recognized Indian tribal governments are not subject to this requirement.  See Form-W-2-Reporting-of-Employer-Sponsored-Health-Coverage

Here is what the IRS stated about the amount shown on the W-2 “employer-sponsored health insurance coverage”.

  • The health care law requires certain employers to report the cost of coverage under an employer-sponsored group health plan.
  • The amount of employer-sponsored health insurance coverage appears in Box 12 of the W-2, and has the code letters “DD” next to it.
  • Reporting the cost of health care coverage on the Form W-2 does not mean that the coverage is taxable or that it needs to be reported on the tax return.
  • The amount in Box 12 is only for government information collection only, and shows the payments made by the taxpayer and the employer and is not included in the amount shown in Box 1, which is the amount of taxable earnings.

Reporting on the Form W-2

The value of the health care coverage will be reported in Box 12 of the Form W-2, with Code DD to identify the amount. There is no reporting on the Form W-3 of the total of these amounts for all the employer’s employees.

In general, the amount reported should include both the portion paid by the employer and the portion paid by the employee. See the chart, below, and the questions and answers for more information.

An employer is not required to issue a Form W-2 solely to report the value of the health care coverage for retirees or other employees or former employees to whom the employer would not otherwise provide a Form W-2.

Form W-2 Reporting of Employer-Sponsored Health Coverage

Coverage Type

Form W-2, Box 12, Code DD

Report

Do Not Report

Optional

Major medical

X

Dental or vision plan not integrated into another medical or health plan

X

Dental or vision plan which gives the choice of declining or electing and paying an additional premium

X

Health Flexible Spending Arrangement (FSA) funded solely by salary-reduction amounts

X

Health FSA value for the plan year in excess of employee’s cafeteria plan salary reductions for all qualified benefits

X

Health Reimbursement Arrangement (HRA) contributions

X

Health Savings Arrangement (HSA) contributions (employer or employee)

X

Archer Medical Savings Account (Archer MSA) contributions (employer or employee)

X

Hospital indemnity or specified illness (insured or self-funded), paid on after-tax basis

X

Hospital indemnity or specified illness (insured or self-funded), paid through salary reduction (pre-tax) or by employer

X

Employee Assistance Plan (EAP) providing applicable employer-sponsored healthcare coverage

Required if employer charges a COBRA premium

Optional if employer does not charge a COBRA premium

On-site medical clinics providing applicable employer-sponsored healthcare coverage

Required if employer charges a COBRA premium

Optional if employer does not charge a COBRA premium

Wellness programs providing applicable employer-sponsored healthcare coverage

Required if employer charges a COBRA premium

Optional if employer does not charge a COBRA premium

Multi-employer plans

X

Domestic partner coverage included in gross income

X

Governmental plans providing coverage primarily for members of the military and their families

X

Federally recognized Indian tribal government plans and plans of tribally charted corporations wholly owned by a federally recognized Indian tribal government

X

Self-funded plans not subject to Federal COBRA

X

Accident or disability income

X

Long-term care

X

Liability insurance

X

Supplemental liability insurance

X

Workers’ compensation

X

Automobile medical payment insurance

X

Credit-only insurance

X

Excess reimbursement to highly compensated individual, included in gross income

X

Payment/reimbursement of health insurance premiums for 2% shareholder-employee, included in gross income

X

Other Situations

Report

Do Not Report

Optional

Employers required to file fewer than 250 Forms W-2 for the preceding calendar year (determined without application of any entity aggregation rules for related employers)

X

Forms W-2 furnished to employees who terminate before the end of a calendar year and request, in writing, a Form W-2 before the end of that year

X

Forms W-2 provided by third-party sick-pay provider to employees of other employers

X

The chart was created at the suggestion of and in collaboration with the IRS’ Information Reporting Program Advisory Committee (IRPAC). IRPAC’s members are representatives of industries responsible for providing information returns, such as Form W-2, to the IRS. IRPAC works with IRS to improve the information reporting process.

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Energy-Efficient Home Improvements Can Lower Your Taxes

Posted by William Byrnes on April 10, 2014


The IRS reported in Tax Tip 2014-47 that a taxpayer may be able to reduce taxes if making certain energy-efficient home improvements last year.

Key Tax Facts about home energy tax credits:

2014_tf_on_individuals_small_businesses-m_1Residential Energy Efficient Property Credit

  • This tax credit is 30 percent (30%) of the cost of alternative energy equipment installed on or in the home.
  • Qualified equipment includes solar hot water heaters, solar electric equipment and wind turbines.
  • There is no dollar limit on the credit for most types of property. If the credit is more than the tax owed for the year, then the  unused portion of this credit can be carried forward to next year’s tax return.
  • The home must be in the U.S BUT it does not have to be the main home.
  • This credit is available through 2016.

Non-Business Energy Property Credit no longer offered after 2013 tax return

  • This credit is worth 10 percent (10%) of the cost of certain qualified energy-saving items added to the main home last year. This includes items such as insulation, windows, doors and roofs.
  • Taxpayer may also be able to claim the credit for the actual cost of certain property. This may include items such as water heaters and heating and air conditioning systems. Each type of property has a different dollar limit.
  • This credit has a maximum lifetime limit of $500, but only $200 of this limit may be for windows.
  • Main home must be located in the U.S. to qualify for the credit.
  • Obtain a written certification from the manufacturer that their product qualifies for this tax credit. They usually post it on their website or include it with the product’s packaging. Taxpayer’s may rely on such certificate to claim the credit.
  • This credit expired at the end of 2013. You may still claim the credit on your 2013 tax return if you didn’t reach the lifetime limit in prior years.

Use Form 5695, Residential Energy Credits, to claim these credits.

For more than half a century, Tax Facts has been an essential resource designed to meet the real-world tax-guidance needs of professionals in both the insurance and investment industries.  Use coupon code: TAX15 and save 15%!

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4 Tax Facts for Trading Services With Other Persons Taxable?

Posted by William Byrnes on April 9, 2014


The IRS published Tax Tip 2014-26: Four Things You Should Know About “Barter”

“Bartering” is the trading of one product or service for another. Often there is no exchange of cash. Small businesses sometimes barter to get products or services they need.  For example, a plumber might trade plumbing work with a dentist for dental services. 

If a taxpayer trade services with another person, “bartering”, then the value of the products or the services received by the taxpayer is taxable income.

Here are four facts that the IRS has alerted taxpayers to about bartering:

1. Barter exchanges.  A barter exchange is an organized marketplace where members barter products or services. Some exchanges operate out of an office and others over the Internet. All barter exchanges are required to issue Form 1099-B, Proceeds from Broker and Barter Exchange Transactions. The exchange must give a copy of the form to its members who barter and file a copy with the IRS.

2. Bartering income.  Barter and trade dollars are the same as real dollars for tax purposes and must be reported on a tax return. Both parties must report as income the fair market value of the product or service each received.

3. Tax implications.  Bartering is taxable in the year it occurs. The tax rules may vary based on the type of bartering that takes place. Barterers may owe income taxes, self-employment taxes, employment taxes or excise taxes on their bartering income.

4. Reporting rules.  How you report bartering on a tax return varies. If the taxpayer has a trade or business, then normally the taxpayer reports it on Form 1040,Schedule C, Profit or Loss from Business.

For more information, see the Bartering Tax Center.

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10 Tax Facts: Do You Qualify for the Child and Dependent Care Tax Credit To Reduce Your Taxes?

Posted by William Byrnes on April 6, 2014


In Tax Tip 2014-37, the IRS provides ten tax tips for taxpayers that pay for the care of their child or other dependent while they’re at work.  The Child and Dependent Care Credit can reduce that cost of that child care.

10 tax facts from the IRS about this important tax credit

1. A taxpayer may qualify for the credit if the taxpayer paid someone to care for a child, dependent or spouse last year.

2. The care a taxpayer paid for must have been necessary so the taxpayer could work or look for work.  This also applies to the spouse if married and filing jointly.

3. The care must have been for ‘qualifying persons.’ A qualifying person can be a taxpayer’s child under age 13.  Qualifying persons may also be a spouse or dependent who is physically or mentally incapable of self-care. T hey must also have lived with the taxpayer for more than half the year.

4.  The taxpayer and the spouse if file jointly, must have earned income, such as wages from a job.  Special rules apply to a spouse who is a student or disabled.

5. The payments for care can not go to a spouse, the parent of your qualifying person or to someone claimed as a dependent on the taxpayer’s return. Care payments also can not go to a child under the age of 19, even if the child is not claimed as a dependent.

6. The credit is worth up to 35 percent of the qualifying costs for care, depending on a taxpayer’s income. The limit is $3,000 of the total cost for the care of one qualifying person. If the taxpayer pays for the care of two or more qualifying persons, the taxpayer can claim up to $6,000 of the costs.

7. If a taxpayer’s employer provides dependent care benefits, special rules apply.

8. A taxpayer must include the Social Security number of each qualifying person to claim the credit.

9. A taxpayer must include the name, address and identifying number of each care provider to claim the credit.  This is usually the Social Security number of an individual or the Employer Identification Number of a business.

10. To claim the credit, attach Form 2441 to the tax return.

tax-facts-online_medium

Due to a number of recent changes in the law, taxpayers are currently facing many questions connected to important issues such as healthcare, home office use, capital gains, investments, and whether an individual is considered an employee or a contractor. Financial advisors are continually looking for updated tax information that can help them provide the right answers to the right people at the right time. This brand-new resource provides fast, clear, and authoritative answers to pressing questions, and it does so in the convenient, timesaving, Q&A format for which Tax Facts is famous.

Our brand-new Tax Facts title is exciting in many ways,” says Rick Kravitz, Vice President & Managing Director of Summit Professional Network’s Professional Publishing Division. “First of all, it fills a huge gap in the resources available to today’s advisors. Small business is a big market, and this book enables advisors to get up-and-running right away, with proven guidance that will help them serve their clients’ needs. Secondly, it addresses the biggest questions facing all taxpayers and provides absolutely reliable answers that help advisors solve today’s biggest problems with confidence.”

Robert Bloink, Esq., LL.M., and William H. Byrnes, Esq., LL.M., CWM®—are delivering real-life guidance based on decades of experience.  The authors’ knowledge and experience in tax law and practice provides the expert guidance for National Underwriter to once again deliver a valuable resource for the financial advising community,” added Rick Kravitz.

Anyone interested can try Tax Facts on Individuals & Small Business, risk-free for 30 days, with a 100% guarantee of complete satisfaction.  For more information, please go to www.nationalunderwriter.com/TaxFactsIndividuals or call 1-800-543-0874.  Use coupon code TAX15 and save 15%!

Posted in Taxation | Tagged: , | Leave a Comment »

2013 Home Office Deduction Easier To Calculate

Posted by William Byrnes on April 5, 2014


In Tax Tip 2014-36, the IRS alerted taxpayers about the new, simple calculation for the Home Office deduction.

If a taxpayer works from home, then it may be possible for the taxpayer to claim the home office deduction.  However, in years past this home office deduction has been rather complicated to calculate.

Starting this year (and applying to the 2013 tax return die in just 10 days), the IRS has provided a simpler option to calculate the deduction for business use of your home. The new option will save taxpayers time because it simplifies how to calculate and claim the deduction.  It also makes it easier for a taxpayer to keep records.  However, this new option for simplified method of calculation does NOT change the rules for who may claim the home office deduction.

6 tax facts about the home office deduction

1. Generally, in order to claim a deduction for a home office, a taxpayer must use a part of your home exclusively and regularly for business purposes. Also, the part of your home used for business must be:

  • the principal place of business, or
  • a place where the taxpayer meets clients or customers in the normal course of business, or
  • a separate structure not attached to the home. Examples might include a studio, garage or barn.

What clearly does NOT qualify for a home office deduction?  By example, a taxpayer sets up a computer in her bedroom on a dresser that she uses for personal emails and for keeping her business records.  In the dresser drawers are pens, paperclips, some receipts, as well as hair clips and some pieces of jewelry.  The IRS isn’t going to allow a home office deduction based on that computer on that dresser.

2. If a taxpayer uses the actual expense method, the home office deduction includes certain costs that the taxpayer paid for your home. For example, if the taxpayer rents a home, part of the rent paid could qualify for the home office deduction.  If the taxpayer own a home, part of the mortgage interest, taxes and utilities paid could correspondingly qualify. The amount of the deduction usually depends on the percentage of the home used for business.

3. Beginning with 2013 tax returns, the taxpayer may be able to use the simplified option to claim the home office deduction instead of claiming actual expenses. Under this method, the taxpayer multiplies the allowable square footage of the office area by a prescribed rate of $5.  The maximum footage allowed by the IRS is 300 square feet. The deduction maximum limit using this method is thus $1,500 per year.

4. If the taxpayer’s gross income from the business use of your home is less than the expenses, the deduction for some expenses may be limited.

5. If the taxpayer is self-employed and chooses the actual expense method, then the taxpayer should use Form 8829, Expenses for Business Use of Your Home, to calculate the amount of the home office deduction.  The taxpayer claims the deduction on Schedule C, Profit or Loss From Business, whether using the simplified or actual expense method.

6. If the taxpayer is an employee, then additional rules apply to claim the deduction. For example, in addition to the above tests, the business use must also be for the employer’s convenience.  By example: a “work from home” arrangement.

tax-facts-online_medium

Due to a number of recent changes in the law, taxpayers are currently facing many questions connected to important issues such as healthcare, home office use, capital gains, investments, and whether an individual is considered an employee or a contractor. Financial advisors are continually looking for updated tax information that can help them provide the right answers to the right people at the right time. This brand-new resource provides fast, clear, and authoritative answers to pressing questions, and it does so in the convenient, timesaving, Q&A format for which Tax Facts is famous.

“Our brand-new Tax Facts title is exciting in many ways,” says Rick Kravitz, Vice President & Managing Director of Summit Professional Network’s Professional Publishing Division. “First of all, it fills a huge gap in the resources available to today’s advisors. Small business is a big market, and this book enables advisors to get up-and-running right away, with proven guidance that will help them serve their clients’ needs. Secondly, it addresses the biggest questions facing all taxpayers and provides absolutely reliable answers that help advisors solve today’s biggest problems with confidence.”

Robert Bloink, Esq., LL.M., and William H. Byrnes, Esq., LL.M., CWM®—are delivering real-life guidance based on decades of experience.  The authors’ knowledge and experience in tax law and practice provides the expert guidance for National Underwriter to once again deliver a valuable resource for the financial advising community,” added Rick Kravitz.

Anyone interested can try Tax Facts on Individuals & Small Business, risk-free for 30 days, with a 100% guarantee of complete satisfaction.  For more information, please go to www.nationalunderwriter.com/TaxFactsIndividuals or call 1-800-543-0874.

Posted in Taxation | Tagged: , , | Leave a Comment »

Employers Face Stiff Obama Care Excise Taxes (aka Penalties)

Posted by William Byrnes on April 4, 2014


The Affordable Health Care Act (ACA) (“Obama Care”) may lead to stiff excise taxes for midsize and larger employers that misclassify employees as independent contractors (see §4980H Shared responsibility for employers regarding health coverage).  The term “applicable large employer” means, with respect to a calendar year, an employer who employed an average of at least 50 full-time employees on business days during the preceding calendar year.  The term “full-time employee” means, with respect to any month, an employee who is employed on average at least 30 hours of service per week.  However, employers with less than a 100 employees have a transition period until 2016 for the application of §4980H.

Employers that misclassify employees as independent contractors already face potential tax liability and tax penalties for each misclassified employee.  In addition to these current potential liabilities and penalties for misclassification, employers will now face excise tax assessments under the ACA.   This new excise tax is $2,000 per employee not covered by a qualifying employer medical plan.  However, to encourage compliance with the ACA, if less than 95% of the employees of an employer are covered by a qualified medical employer plan, then a stiffer penalty of $2,000 for every employee of the company may be imposed, albeit with an exemption of the excise tax applying to the first 30 employees.

By example, an employer has 50 workers of which the employer has classified 80% (40) as employees and the remaining 20% (10) as independent contractors.  The employer provides a medical insurance plan for the 40 employees that qualifies for purposes of the ACA.  The §4980H issue is moot, meaning it does not need to be considered, because the employer does not reach the minimum 50 employee threshold.  But now the problem …

The IRS audits the employer and determines that the employer has misclassified the 10 independent contractors, and re-classifies them as employees.  The employer has employment tax issues, and penalties to contend with, regarding the 10 employees.  But also, §4980H now applies because the employer has reached 50 employees.  Worse yet, the employer has not covered 95% of its employees with qualified medical coverage.  Instead of 40 employees covered out of 40 covered for 100% coverage, after audit the employer is determined to have only covered 80% of employees (40 out of 50), missing the minimum 95% threshold.   Thus, the excise tax does not apply to just the 10 employees but instead applies to all employees, with an allowance for the first 30.  How much excise tax will be owed then?  50 employees, subtracting the allowance for the first 30, leaves 20 employees multiplied by the excise  tax of $2,000, thus $40,000 for the year (on top of normal employment taxes and penalties for the 10 misclassified employees).

Classification of a worker as either an “employee” or an “independent contractor” is based on the common law standard of an examination of the facts and circumstances of the relationship between the employer and the worker to assess whether the employer has the right to direct and control the performance of services.  Substantial case law has developed from disputes between employers and the IRS, and between workers, who may want to be classified as independent contractors to better leverage tax deductions, and the IRS.

tax-facts-online_medium

Due to a number of recent changes in the law, taxpayers are currently facing many questions connected to important issues such as healthcare, home office use, capital gains, investments, and whether an individual is considered an employee or a contractor. Financial advisors are continually looking for updated tax information that can help them provide the right answers to the right people at the right time. This brand-new resource provides fast, clear, and authoritative answers to pressing questions, and it does so in the convenient, timesaving, Q&A format for which Tax Facts is famous.

“Our brand-new Tax Facts title is exciting in many ways,” says Rick Kravitz, Vice President & Managing Director of Summit Professional Network’s Professional Publishing Division. “First of all, it fills a huge gap in the resources available to today’s advisors. Small business is a big market, and this book enables advisors to get up-and-running right away, with proven guidance that will help them serve their clients’ needs. Secondly, it addresses the biggest questions facing all taxpayers and provides absolutely reliable answers that help advisors solve today’s biggest problems with confidence.”

Robert Bloink, Esq., LL.M., and William H. Byrnes, Esq., LL.M., CWM®—are delivering real-life guidance based on decades of experience.  The authors’ knowledge and experience in tax law and practice provides the expert guidance for National Underwriter to once again deliver a valuable resource for the financial advising community,” added Rick Kravitz.

Anyone interested can try Tax Facts on Individuals & Small Business, risk-free for 30 days, with a 100% guarantee of complete satisfaction.  For more information, please go to www.nationalunderwriter.com/TaxFactsIndividuals or call 1-800-543-0874.

Posted in Compliance, Taxation | Tagged: , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Ten Tax Facts about Capital Gains and Losses

Posted by William Byrnes on April 4, 2014


In Tax Tip 2014-27, the IRS discussed capital gains and losses.  The IRS stated that when a taxpayer sells a ’capital asset,’ the sale usually results in a capital gain or loss. A ‘capital asset’ includes most property owned and used for personal or investment purposes.

10 tax facts about capital gains and losses:

1. Capital assets include property such as a home or a car. They also include investment property such as stocks and bonds.

2. A capital gain or loss is the difference between the “basis” and the amount earned upon the sale of the asset.  The basis is usually what the taxpayer paid for the asset.

3. A taxpayer must include all capital gains in income.  Beginning in 2013, a taxpayer may be subject to the Obama Care “Net Investment Income Tax”.  The NIIT applies at a rate of 3.8% to certain net investment income of individuals, estates, and trusts that have income above statutory threshold amounts.

4. A taxpayer can deduct capital losses on the sale of investment property (such as an apartment building) but can not deduct losses on the sale of personal-use property (such as the family home).

5. Capital gains and losses are either long-term or short-term, depending on how long the property is owned.  If a taxpayer owns the property for more than one year, the gain or loss is long-term.  If owned one year or less, the gain or loss is short-term.

6. If long-term gains are more than long-term losses, the difference between the two is a “net long-term capital gain”.  If net long-term capital gain is more than net short-term capital loss, then the taxpayer has a ‘net capital gain.’

7. The tax rates that apply to net capital gains will usually depend on a taxpayer’s income.  For lower-income individuals, the rate may be zero percent on some or all of their net capital gains.  In 2013, the maximum net capital gain tax rate increased from 15 to 20 percent. A 25 or 28 percent tax rate can also apply to special types of net capital gains.

8. If capital losses are more than capital gains, the taxpayer can deduct the difference as a loss on the tax return. This loss is limited to $3,000 per year, or $1,500 if filing married but separate returns.

9. If total net capital loss is more than the deduction limit above, the losses above the allowable deduction can be carried over to next year’s tax return.  The carried over losses will be treated as if they happened next year.

10. File Form 8949, Sales and Other Dispositions of Capital Assets, with the federal tax return to report your gains and losses.   Also file Schedule D, Capital Gains and Losses with the federal tax return.

2014_tf_on_investments-m2014 Tax Facts on Investments provides clear, concise answers to often complex tax questions concerning investments.  Pertinent planning points are provided throughout.

Organized in a convenient Q&A format to speed you to the information you need, 2014 Tax Facts on Investments delivers the latest guidance on:

  • Mutual Funds, Unit Trusts, REITs
  • Incentive Stock Options
  • Options & Futures
  • Real Estate
  • Stocks, Bonds
  • Oil & Gas
  • Precious Metals & Collectibles
  • And much more!

Key updates for 2014:

  • Important federal income and estate tax developments impacting investments, including changes from the American Taxpayer Relief Act of 2012
  • Expanded coverage of Reverse Mortgages
  • Expanded coverage of Real Estate Investment Trusts (REITs)
  • More than 30 new Planning Points, written by practitioners for practitioners, in the following areas:
    • Limitations on Loss Deductions
    • Charitable Gifts
    • Reverse Mortgages
    • Deduction of Interest and Expenses
    • REITs

Plus, you’re kept up-to-date with online supplements for critical developments.  Written and reviewed by practicing professionals who are subject matter experts in their respective topics, Tax Facts is the practical resource you can rely on.

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Six Tax Tips When Deciding to Itemize or Take the Standard Deduction

Posted by William Byrnes on April 1, 2014


2014_tf_on_individuals_small_businesses-m_1The IRS published Tax Tip 2014-29 with 6 helpful tips for deciding whether to itemize deductions or to rely upon the standard deduction.  The IRS stated that a taxpayer should calculate the available deduction using both methods and then choose the deduction method that produces the greater deduction (thus lower amount of tax).

1. Figure the itemized deductions.  Add up deductible expenses paid during the year. These may include expenses such as:

  • Home mortgage interest
  • State and local income taxes or sales taxes (but not both)
  • Real estate and personal property taxes
  • Gifts to charities
  • Casualty or theft losses
  • Unreimbursed medical expenses
  • Unreimbursed employee business expenses

2. Know the standard deduction.  If a taxpayer does not itemize, the basic standard deduction for 2013 depends on your filing status:

  • Single $6,100
  • Married Filing Jointly $12,200
  • Head of Household $8,950
  • Married Filing Separately $6,100
  • Qualifying Widow(er) $12,200

The standard deduction is higher for persons when 65 or older or blind.

3. Check the exceptions.  Some taxpayers do not qualify for the standard deduction and therefore should itemize.  This includes married couples who file separate returns and one spouse itemizes.

4. Use the IRS’s ITA tool: Interactive Tax Assistant tool to help determine your standard deduction.

5. File the right forms.  To itemize deductions, use Form 1040 and Schedule A, Itemized Deductions. Standard deduction is on Forms 1040, 1040A or 1040EZ.

6. File Electronically.  Some taxpayers are eligible for free, brand-name software to prepare and e-file the tax return. IRS Free File will do the work for you.

tax-facts-online_medium

For more than half a century, Tax Facts has been an essential resource designed to meet the real-world tax-guidance needs of professionals in both the insurance and investment industries.  For over 110 years, National Underwriter has been the first in line with the targeted tax, insurance, and financial planning information you need to make critical business decisions.

Due to a number of recent changes in the law, taxpayers are currently facing many questions connected to important issues such as healthcare, home office use, capital gains, investments, and whether an individual is considered an employee or a contractor. Financial advisors are continually looking for updated tax information that can help them provide the right answers to the right people at the right time. This brand-new resource provides fast, clear, and authoritative answers to pressing questions, and it does so in the convenient, timesaving, Q&A format for which Tax Facts is famous.

“Our brand-new Tax Facts title is exciting in many ways,” says Rick Kravitz, Vice President & Managing Director of Summit Professional Network’s Professional Publishing Division. “First of all, it fills a huge gap in the resources available to today’s advisors. Small business is a big market, and this book enables advisors to get up-and-running right away, with proven guidance that will help them serve their clients’ needs. Secondly, it addresses the biggest questions facing all taxpayers and provides absolutely reliable answers that help advisors solve today’s biggest problems with confidence.”

 

Posted in Taxation, Uncategorized | Tagged: , , , | Leave a Comment »

Today is the deadline to sign up for health care (or face penalties)

Posted by William Byrnes on March 31, 2014


In Health Care Tax Tip 2014-11 the IRS reminds taxpayers that today, March 31, is the deadline to sign up for health care for 2014 – or face penalties.

Below are five tips about the Obama Care (ACA) health care law that the IRS wants taxpayers to consider.

• Currently Insured – No Change: If a taxpayer is already insured, do not need to do anything more than continue that insurance.

• Uninsured – Enroll by Today – March 31: The open enrollment period to purchase health care coverage through the Health Insurance Marketplace for 2014 runs through March 31, 2014. When a taxpayer chooses health insurance through the marketplace, the taxpayer may be able to receive advance payments of the premium tax credit that will immediately help lower the monthly premium.

• Premium Tax Credit To Lower the Monthly Premium: If a taxpayer chooses insurance through the Marketplace, the taxpayer may be eligible to claim the premium tax credit. The taxpayer may elect to have advance payments of the tax credit sent directly to the insurance company during 2014 so that the monthly premium the taxpayer must pay is lower, or the taxpayer can wait to claim the credit when filing the tax return in 2015.  If a taxpayer chooses to have advance payments sent to the insurance company, then the taxpayer must reconcile the payments on the 2014 tax return, which will be filed in 2015.

• Change in Circumstances: If a taxpayer receives advance payments of the premium tax credit to help pay for the insurance coverage, then the taxpayer must report “life changes”, such as income, marital status or family size changes, to the Marketplace. Reporting changes will help to make sure the taxpayer has the right coverage and is getting the proper amount of advance payments of the premium tax credit.

• Individual Shared Responsibility Payment: Starting January 2014, taxpayers and the family must have health care coverage or have an exemption from coverage.  Most people already have qualifying health care coverage.  These individuals will not need to do anything more than maintain that coverage throughout 2014.  If a taxpayer can afford coverage but decides not to buy it and remain uninsured throughout the year, that taxpayer may have to make an “individual shared responsibility payment” (a.k.a. the ACA penalty) when filing a 2014 tax return in 2015.

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Small Business Health Care Tax Credit

Posted by William Byrnes on March 30, 2014


2013_tf_insurance_emp_benefits_combo_covers-m_2In the IRS’ Health Care Tax Tip (HCTT-2014-08), it revealed that the “Small Business Health Care Tax Credit” helps small businesses and tax-exempt organizations pay for health care coverage they offer their employees.

A small employer is eligible for the credit if it has fewer than 25 employees who work full-time, or a combination of full-time and part-time. For example, two half-time employees equal one employee for purposes of the credit.

For 2013, the average annual wages of employees must be less than $50,000, and the employer must pay a uniform percentage for all employees that is equal to at least 50% of the premium cost of the insurance coverage.

The maximum credit is 35 percent of premiums paid for small business employers and 25 percent of premiums paid for small tax-exempt employers such as charities.

If no tax is owed during the year, then the tax credit may be carried back or forward to other tax years.

For small tax-exempt employers, the credit is refundable, so even if no taxable income is due, the credit may be refunded so long as it does not exceed the income tax withholding and Medicare tax liability.

Authoritative and easy-to-use, 2014 Tax Facts on Insurance & Employee Benefits shows you how the tax law and regulations are relevant to your insurance, employee benefits, and financial planning practices.  Often complex tax law and regulations are explained in clear, understandable language.  Pertinent planning points are provided throughout.

Organized in a convenient Q&A format to speed you to the information you need, 2014 Tax Facts on Insurance & Employee Benefits delivers the latest guidance on:

  • Estate & Gift Tax Planning
  • Roth IRAs
  • HSAs
  • Capital Gains, Qualifying Dividends
  • Non-qualified Deferred Compensation Under IRC Section 409A
  • And much more!

Key updates for 2014:

  • Important federal income and estate tax developments impacting insurance and employee benefits including changes from the American Taxpayer Relief Act of 2012
  • Concise updated explanation and highlights of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (PPACA)
  • Expanded coverage of Annuities
  • New section on Structured Settlements
  • New section on International Tax
  • More than thirty new Planning Points, written by practitioners for practitioners, in the following areas:
    • Life Insurance
    • Health Insurance
    • Estate and Gift Tax
    • Deferred Compensation
    • Individual Retirement Plans

Plus, you’re kept up-to-date with online supplements for critical developments.  Written and reviewed by practicing professionals who are subject matter experts in their respective topics, Tax Facts is the practical resource you can rely on.

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Simplified Option for Claiming Home Office Deduction Now Available – May Deduct up to $1,500!

Posted by William Byrnes on March 29, 2014


2014_tf_on_individuals_small_businesses-m_1The IRS reported in Newswire (IR-2014-24) that people with home-based businesses that this year for the first time they can choose a new simplified option for claiming the deduction for business use of a home.

In tax year 2011, the most recent year for which figures are available, some 3.3 million taxpayers claimed deductions for business use of a home (commonly referred to as the home office deduction) totaling nearly $10 billion.  The new optional deduction, capped at $1,500 per year based on $5 a square foot for up to 300 square feet, will reduce the paperwork and record keeping burden on small businesses by an estimated 1.6 million hours annually.

The new option is available starting with the 2013 return taxpayers are filing now.  Normally, home-based businesses are required to fill out a 43-line form (Form 8829) often with complex calculations of allocated expenses, depreciation and carryovers of unused deductions.  Instead, taxpayers claiming the optional deduction need only complete a short worksheet in the tax instructions and enter the result on their return.  Self-employed individuals claim the home office deduction on Schedule C Line 30, farmers claim it on Schedule F  Line 32 and eligible employees claim it on Schedule A Line 21.

Though homeowners using the new option cannot depreciate the portion of their home used in a trade or business, they can claim allowable mortgage interest, real estate taxes and casualty losses on the home as itemized deductions on Schedule A. These deductions need not be allocated between personal and business use, as is required under the regular method.

Business expenses unrelated to the home, such as advertising, supplies and wages paid to employees, are still fully deductible.  Long-standing restrictions on the home office deduction, such as the requirement that a home office be used regularly and exclusively for business and the limit tied to the income derived from the particular business, still apply under the new option.

IRS YouTube Video:
Simplified Home Office Deduction: English / Spanish / ASL

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Preventing Tax Preparer Fraud: IRS Initiatives and the Loving case

Posted by William Byrnes on March 28, 2014


by Dawna E. Snipes

Why the Increase in Tax Preparer Fraud?

Tax preparer fraud has become more paramount with taxpayers choosing to have their federal tax returns prepared by paid return providers.  When unadvised and vulnerable taxpayers choose unqualified and unscrupulous preparers, they potentially face IRS penalties for filing false returns.

26 U.S.C. §7701(a)(3) defines a tax return preparer as “any person who prepares tax returns for others for compensation.”[1]  The Internal Revenue Service (IRS) has estimated that approximately 60 percent of taxpayers use paid tax preparers to file their taxes.  However, between 2012 and 2013, the IRS successfully obtained permanent injunctions against over 30 preparers operating throughout the country.  Some reasons for the increase in tax preparer fraud are (1) lack of federal regulations, (2) an arduous tax code, and (3) overly-burdened enforcement agencies.

Read the full article at http://www.advisorfyi.com/2014/01/preventing-tax-preparer-fraud-irs-initiatives-and-the-loving-case/

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IRS Reminds Individuals of Health Care Choices for 2014

Posted by William Byrnes on March 28, 2014


In Issue Number HC-TT- 2014-01, the IRS released reminders for Individuals about the 2014 Health Care Choices.  In 3 days, on March 31, the Heath Care Market Exchange enrollment period will close.

Starting in 2014, each person must choose to either have basic health insurance coverage (known as minimum essential coverage) for everyone in the family for each month or go without health care coverage for some or all of the year.

If a person don’t maintain health insurance coverage, then that person will need to either seek an exemption or pay a penalty (called an “individual shared responsibility payment”) with the 2014 income tax return filed in 2015. 

What Qualifies as Health Insurance to Avoid the Penalty?

Qualifying coverage includes:

  • health insurance coverage provided by your employer (including COBRA and retiree coverage),
  • health insurance coverage purchase through a health care exchange Marketplace,
  • Medicare, Medicaid or other government-sponsored health coverage including programs for veterans, or
  • coverage you buy directly from an insurance company.

Qualifying coverage does not include certain coverage that may provide limited benefits, such as coverage only for vision care or dental care, workers’ compensation, or coverage only for a specific disease or condition. 

Premium Tax Credit May Help Pay for Health Insurance

If purchasing health insurance coverage through the Marketplace, the person may be eligible for financial assistance including the premium tax credit, which will help lower the out-of-pocket cost of your monthly insurance premiums (see yesterday’s blog article).

Exemptions

If a person chooses to go without coverage or experiences a gap in coverage, the person may still qualify for an exemption based upon (1) not having access to affordable coverage, (2) the gap is less than three consecutive months without coverage, or (3) qualifying for one of several other exemptions.  A special hardship exemption applies to individuals who purchase their insurance through the Marketplace during the initial enrollment period but due to the enrollment process have a coverage gap at the beginning of 2014.

Penalty for Not Having Health Insurance

If a person (or any of dependents) do not maintain coverage and do not qualify for an exemption, then the person will owe a penalty, called a “individual shared responsibility payment”, paid when filing the tax return in 2015.  In general, the payment amount is either a percentage of household income or a flat dollar amount, whichever is greater.

The person will owe 1/12th of the annual payment for each month you (or your dependents) do not have coverage and are not exempt. The annual payment amount for 2014 is the greater of:

  • 1 percent of household income that is above the tax return filing threshold for the filing status, such as Married Filing Jointly or single, or
  • A family’s flat dollar amount, which is $95 per adult and $47.50 per child, limited to a maximum of $285.

The penalty is capped at the cost of the national average premium for the bronze level health plan available through the Marketplace in 2014.

For more than half a century, Tax Facts has been an essential resource designed to meet the real-world tax-guidance needs of professionals in both the insurance and investment industries.

2014_tf_on_individuals_small_businesses-m_1Due to a number of recent changes in the law, taxpayers are currently facing many questions connected to important issues such as healthcare, home office use, capital gains, investments, and whether an individual is considered an employee or a contractor. Financial advisors are continually looking for updated tax information that can help them provide the right answers to the right people at the right time. This brand-new resource provides fast, clear, and authoritative answers to pressing questions, and it does so in the convenient, timesaving, Q&A format for which Tax Facts is famous.

“Our brand-new Tax Facts title is exciting in many ways,” says Rick Kravitz, Vice President & Managing Director of Summit Professional Network’s Professional Publishing Division. “First of all, it fills a huge gap in the resources available to today’s advisors. Small business is a big market, and this book enables advisors to get up-and-running right away, with proven guidance that will help them serve their clients’ needs. Secondly, it addresses the biggest questions facing all taxpayers and provides absolutely reliable answers that help advisors solve today’s biggest problems with confidence.”

tax-facts-online_mediumThe company also points out that the expert authors—Robert Bloink, Esq., LL.M., and William H. Byrnes, Esq., LL.M., CWM®—are delivering real-life guidance based on decades of experience.

The authors’ knowledge and experience in tax law and practice provides the expert guidance for National Underwriter to once again deliver a valuable resource for the financial advising community,” added Kravitz.

Anyone interested can try Tax Facts on Individuals & Small Business, risk-free for 30 days, with a 100% guarantee of complete satisfaction.  For more information, please go to www.nationalunderwriter.com/TaxFactsIndividuals or call 1-800-543-0874.

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The Obama Care “Premium Tax Credit” – 4 days left to take advantage

Posted by William Byrnes on March 27, 2014


On February 25, the IRS released Health Care Tax Tip 2014-03 reminding taxpayers that time is running out – only 4 days left – to enroll for health insurance coverage through the Health Insurance Marketplace.

However, the premium tax credit can help make purchasing health insurance coverage more affordable for people with moderate incomes. To be eligible for the premium tax credit, a tax filer must satisfy three rules:  

1.  Sign up for health insurance coverage through the Health Insurance Marketplace.  The open enrollment period to purchase health insurance coverage for 2014 through the Health Insurance Marketplace ENDS in 4 days on March 31, 2014!

2. Household income between one and four times the federal poverty line.  For a family of four for tax year 2014, that means income from $23,550 to $94,200.

3. Not eligible for other medical coverage, such as Medicare, Medicaid, or sufficiently generous employer-sponsored coverage.

If a  Marketplace determines the taxpayer is likely to qualify for the tax credit at the time of signup on the Health Insurance Marketplace, then the taxpayer has two choices:

1. Choose to have some or all of the estimated credit paid in advance directly to the medical insurance company to lower the pay out-of-pocket for the monthly premiums during 2014, or

2. Wait to receive the premium tax credit when the 2014 tax return is filed in 2015.  Waiting to receive the premium tax credit will either increase the tax refund or lower the balance due to the IRS.

For taxpayers choosing to receive the premium tax credit in advance, changes to income or family size will affect the credit eligible to receive.  If the credit on the 2014 tax return (filed in 2015) does not match the amount received in advance, the taxpayer will have to repay any excess advance payment, or you may get a larger refund if you are entitled to more. It is important to tell your Marketplace about changes in your income or family size as they happen during 2014 because these changes will affect the amount of your credit.

For more than half a century, Tax Facts has been an essential resource designed to meet the real-world tax-guidance needs of professionals in both the insurance and investment industries.

2014_tf_on_individuals_small_businesses-m_1Due to a number of recent changes in the law, taxpayers are currently facing many questions connected to important issues such as healthcare, home office use, capital gains, investments, and whether an individual is considered an employee or a contractor. Financial advisors are continually looking for updated tax information that can help them provide the right answers to the right people at the right time. This brand-new resource provides fast, clear, and authoritative answers to pressing questions, and it does so in the convenient, timesaving, Q&A format for which Tax Facts is famous.

“Our brand-new Tax Facts title is exciting in many ways,” says Rick Kravitz, Vice President & Managing Director of Summit Professional Network’s Professional Publishing Division. “First of all, it fills a huge gap in the resources available to today’s advisors. Small business is a big market, and this book enables advisors to get up-and-running right away, with proven guidance that will help them serve their clients’ needs. Secondly, it addresses the biggest questions facing all taxpayers and provides absolutely reliable answers that help advisors solve today’s biggest problems with confidence.”

tax-facts-online_mediumThe company also points out that the expert authors—Robert Bloink, Esq., LL.M., and William H. Byrnes, Esq., LL.M., CWM®—are delivering real-life guidance based on decades of experience.

The authors’ knowledge and experience in tax law and practice provides the expert guidance for National Underwriter to once again deliver a valuable resource for the financial advising community,” added Kravitz.

Anyone interested can try Tax Facts on Individuals & Small Business, risk-free for 30 days, with a 100% guarantee of complete satisfaction.  For more information, please go to www.nationalunderwriter.com/TaxFactsIndividuals or call 1-800-543-0874.

Posted in Taxation | Tagged: , , , , | 3 Comments »

Four Tax Facts about the Health Care Law for Individuals

Posted by William Byrnes on March 26, 2014


In Health Care Tax Tip 2014-06, the IRS alerted taxpayers to four basic tax tips about the new health care law.  The IRS stated that health insurance choices made now may affect the income tax return filed next year (2015).

1. Most people already have qualified health insurance coverage and will not need to do anything more than maintain qualified coverage throughout 2014.

2. If a taxpayer does not have health insurance through a job or a government plan, the taxpayer may be able to buy it through the Health Insurance Marketplace.  The open enrollment period to purchase health insurance coverage for 2014 through the Health Insurance Marketplace ENDS in 5 days on March 31, 2014!

3. If a taxpayer buy health insurance through the Marketplace, the taxpayer may be eligible for an advance premium tax credit to lower your out-of-pocket monthly premiums. (Tomorrow’s blog article will provide information about this advance premium tax credit.)

4. The 2014 tax return to be filed in 2015 will have a new tax question:  did you have insurance coverage or did you qualify for an exemption?  If not, the taxpayer may owe a shared responsibility payment.

What should you do now?

If a taxpayer or the family does not have health insurance, then talk to the employer about the employer’s health coverage offered, or visit the Marketplace online.

Find out more about the health care law and the Marketplace at www.HealthCare.gov.

Find out more about the premium tax credit and the shared responsibility payment at www.IRS.gov/aca.

For more than half a century, Tax Facts has been an essential resource designed to meet the real-world tax-guidance needs of professionals in both the insurance and investment industries.

tax-facts-online_medium

Due to a number of recent changes in the law, taxpayers are currently facing many questions connected to important issues such as healthcare, home office use, capital gains, investments, and whether an individual is considered an employee or a contractor. Financial advisors are continually looking for updated tax information that can help them provide the right answers to the right people at the right time. This brand-new resource provides fast, clear, and authoritative answers to pressing questions, and it does so in the convenient, timesaving, Q&A format for which Tax Facts is famous.

“Our brand-new Tax Facts title is exciting in many ways,” says Rick Kravitz, Vice President & Managing Director of Summit Professional Network’s Professional Publishing Division. “First of all, it fills a huge gap in the resources available to today’s advisors. Small business is a big market, and this book enables advisors to get up-and-running right away, with proven guidance that will help them serve their clients’ needs. Secondly, it addresses the biggest questions facing all taxpayers and provides absolutely reliable answers that help advisors solve today’s biggest problems with confidence.”

The company also points out that the expert authors—Robert Bloink, Esq., LL.M., and William H. Byrnes, Esq., LL.M., CWM®—are delivering real-life guidance based on decades of experience.

The authors’ knowledge and experience in tax law and practice provides the expert guidance for National Underwriter to once again deliver a valuable resource for the financial advising community,” added Kravitz.

Anyone interested can try Tax Facts on Individuals & Small Business, risk-free for 30 days, with a 100% guarantee of complete satisfaction.  For more information, please go to www.nationalunderwriter.com/TaxFactsIndividuals or call 1-800-543-0874.

Posted in Taxation | Tagged: , , , , | Leave a Comment »

EU to Adopt New Expanded Savings Directive

Posted by William Byrnes on March 25, 2014


EU Council Announces March 2014 Adoption of Expanded EU Savings Directive

On Saturday, March 22, 2014 the EU Council’s General Secretariat announced that it will adopt major amendments to the EU Directive on taxation of savings income at its next March 2014 meeting.  The amendments will address the current loopholes, such as application to trusts, to foundations, and to investment income that is comparable to interest income.

Brief Background on EU Savings Directive

The liberalization of capital markets and the free movement of capital within the EU borders revealed how important it was to establish cooperation with a view to preventing, in the direct taxation area, fraud and evasion linked to cross-border financial investments. The problem with taxpayers moving their investments to Member States which did not impose taxation at source while the taxpayers simultaneously under-reported to their respective State of residence (or not reporting at all) the income earned. The EU Savings Directive was adopted to address this situation, coming into effect in 2005.

The mechanism of the Directive works by imposing an obligation to any paying agent in an EU Member State which makes a payment to an individual resident in the other Member State which is the beneficial owner of the income, to report that payment of interest to the competent tax authorities of the Member State in which the paying agent is established. The competent tax authorities of that (source) State in turn transfer the information collected to the competent tax authority of the residence of the beneficial owner. Based on the information received it is possible for the State of residence of the beneficial owner to verify if the amount is declared for tax purposes and to tax the corresponding income.

Loopholes Reported in 2008

In his 2004 Report on the Regulatory, Competitive, Economic and Socio-Economic Impact of the European Union Code of Conduct on Business Taxation and Tax Savings Directive to the United Kingdom Foreign and Commonwealth Office and the Overseas Territories of The Virgin Islands (British), Turks & Caicos Islands, Anguilla and Montserrat, Professor William Byrnes undertook an in-depth analysis of the EU Savings Directive identifying several loopholes that would require later amendments for it to achieve its objectives.

The Savings Directive loopholes include:

• Territorial scope: It is limited to intra-community situations in which a paying agent from one Member State pays to an individual resident in another Member State. It does not apply to payments from outside the EU, i.e. when the paying agent is located in a third (non-EU) State or to payments to beneficial owners who reside in third States.

• Personal scope: it does not apply to persons other than individuals, in particular payments made to legal entities. This limitation provides individuals with opportunities to circumvent the Savings Directive by using an interposed legal person or arrangement.

• Material scope: it does not cover other forms of savings like insurance products, pensions, some tailored investment funds, return on derivative contracts, structured products, etc.

These and other loopholes have been formally reported by the European Commission since 2008. The main findings of a report produced by the Commission identified as a major problem lack of “consistent treatment of other comparable situations”.[1] Pursuing this aim of consistency requires that interest payments obtained by an individual through intermediate vehicles are consistently put on an equal footing with interest payments directly received by the individual. This consistency of coverage is required not only to ensure the effectiveness of the Directive, but also compliance with the rules of the internal market and fair competition between comparable financial products and structures.

A proposal was submitted to the Council which aimed at extending the scope of the Directive.[2] 

European Council Announces Amended Savings Directive Adoption in March 2014

On March 22, 2014 the European Council reported in a press release[3] that (emphasis added):

The European Council welcomes the Commission’s report on the state of play of negotiations on savings taxation with European third countries (Switzerland, Liechtenstein, Monaco, Andorra and San Marino) and calls on those countries to commit fully to implementing the new single global standard for automatic exchange of information, developed by the OECD and endorsed by the G20, and to the early adopters initiative.

The European Council calls on the Commission to carry forth the negotiations with those countries swiftly with a view to concluding them by the end of the year, and invites the Commission to report on the state of play at its December meeting. If sufficient progress is not made, the Commission’s report should explore possible options to ensure compliance with the new global standard.

In the light of this, the Council will adopt the Directive on taxation of savings income at its next March 2014 meeting.

The European Council invites the Council to ensure that, with the adoption of the Directive on Administrative Cooperation by the end of 2014, EU law is fully aligned with the new global standard.

What About the Withholding Exception for Austria and Luxembourg?

While most Member States adopted the exchange of information regime provided in the 2005 Savings Directive, three Member States with a tradition of bank secrecy—Belgium, Luxembourg and Austria—preferred to adopt, during a transitional period, a withholding tax regime. They were authorized to adopt a withholding tax (now 35%) on interest income that is paid to individual savers resident in other EU Member States. In the meantime Belgium decided to discontinue applying the transitional withholding tax as of 1 January 2010 and exchange information instead.

Therefore, only Luxembourg and Austria are currently entitled to levy a withholding tax. Luxembourg has notified the EU Commission that from next year, January 1, 2015 it will discontinue applying the transitional withholding tax and thus begin automatically exchanging information for applicable accounts from that date.

Thus, only Austria has expressed that it will maintain the withholding tax option. Austria’s finance minister is quoted in April 2013 stating: “All this data exchange will not put one red cent in my tax coffers, …. I want to have the money, not a data cemetery.”[4]  However, in light of the Council’s press release on Saturday, this position has probably changed.

The Austria’s Chancellor had also indicated that Austria may begin automatic exchange regarding the interest from savings accounts beginning 2014.[5] Although this statement is different from the Luxembourg commitment towards automatic exchange of information, it would not be surprising that Austria will soon also endorse this automatic exchange standard within the scope of applying the Savings Directive, in light of FATCA, GATCA, and the Council’s press release.

book coverPractical Compliance Aspects of Exchange of Information, FATCA and GATCA

For in-depth analysis of the practical compliance aspects of financial service business providing for exchange of information of information about foreign residents with their national competent authority or with the IRS (FATCA), see Lexis Guide to FATCA Compliance, 2nd Edition just published!

William H. Byrnes, author of six Lexis international tax titles, has achieved authoritative prominence with more than 20 books, 100 book chapters and supplements, and 1,000 media articles.  In 2008 he was appointed Associate Dean at Thomas Jefferson School of Law, previously obtaining Professor of Law with Tenure at St. Thomas University.   William Byrnes was a Senior Manager, then Associate Director of international tax for Coopers and Lybrand, and consulted for clients involved with Africa, Europe, Asia, the Indian sub-continent, and the Caribbean.   He has been commissioned by a number of governments on tax policy.

[1] See Commission Staff Working Document, “Refining the present coverage of Council Directive 2003/48/EC on taxation of income from savings”, SEC (2008), p. 559.

[2] See “Proposal for a Council Directive amending Council Directive 2003/48/EC on taxation of savings income in the form of interest payments”, COM (2008) 727 final, of November 13, 2008.

[3] Conclusions, European Council, Brussels, Euco 7/1/14, 21 March 2014.

[4]“All this data exchange will not put one red cent in my tax coffers,” finance minister Maria Fekter said on 13 April. “I want to have the money, not a data cemetery.”  Stamatoukou, Eleni, “EU Savings Directive to be modified”, New Europe Online, (April 15, 2013) Available at http://www.neurope.eu/article/eu-savings-directive-be-modified.

[5] Austria’s position regarding the extension of the EU Savings Directive requires that such extension be also imposed through international agreements with San Marino, Switzerland, Lichtenstein, Andorra, and Monaco.  However, it is unclear if Austria has since backtracked and made these five agreements a pre-condition for its own automatic information exchange on savings income for depository accounts.  See Bodoni, Stephanie, EU Push For Savings-Tax Deal Fought By Luxembourg, Austria, Bloomberg (Nov 14, 2013).  Available at http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2013-11-14/eu-set-to-fail-to-meet-savings-tax-goal-on-luxembourg-opposition.html.

 

Posted in FATCA, OECD, Taxation, Uncategorized | Tagged: , , , , | 2 Comments »

What do I need to know about the Health Care Law for my 2013 Tax Return?

Posted by William Byrnes on March 23, 2014


The IRS stated in Health Care Tax Tip 2014-10 that for most taxpayers, the Affordable Care Act has no effect on the 2013 federal income tax return. For example, for the 2013 tax return a taxpayer does not yet report health care coverage under the individual shared responsibility provision or claim the premium tax credit.  Reporting of these items start with the filing of the 2014 tax return (which will only happen between late January and April 15, 2015).

However, the IRS alerted that some taxpayers people will be affected by a few provisions, including two new medical taxes and a reduction in the ability to take a deduction for medical expenses incurred during 2013.  See (1) increases in the itemized medical deduction threshold, (2) additional Medicare tax and (3) net investment income tax.

The IRS reminded taxpayers that the employer’s reporting of a taxpayer’s value of health care coverage is not taxable (the new box 12 employer health care reporting requirement, identified by Code DD on an employee’s Form W-2) . 

Information available about other tax provisions in the health care law: More information is available regarding the following tax provisions: Premium Rebate for Medical Loss RatioHealth Flexible Spending Arrangements, and Health Saving Accounts.

tax-facts-online_medium

Due to a number of recent changes in the law, taxpayers are currently facing many questions connected to important issues such as healthcare, home office use, capital gains, investments, and whether an individual is considered an employee or a contractor. Financial advisors are continually looking for updated tax information that can help them provide the right answers to the right people at the right time. This brand-new resource provides fast, clear, and authoritative answers to pressing questions, and it does so in the convenient, timesaving, Q&A format for which Tax Facts is famous.

“Our brand-new Tax Facts title is exciting in many ways,” says Rick Kravitz, Vice President & Managing Director of Summit Professional Network’s Professional Publishing Division. “First of all, it fills a huge gap in the resources available to today’s advisors. Small business is a big market, and this book enables advisors to get up-and-running right away, with proven guidance that will help them serve their clients’ needs. Secondly, it addresses the biggest questions facing all taxpayers and provides absolutely reliable answers that help advisors solve today’s biggest problems with confidence.”

Robert Bloink, Esq., LL.M., and William H. Byrnes, Esq., LL.M., CWM®—are delivering real-life guidance based on decades of experience.  The authors’ knowledge and experience in tax law and practice provides the expert guidance for National Underwriter to once again deliver a valuable resource for the financial advising community,” added Rick Kravitz.

Anyone interested can try Tax Facts on Individuals & Small Business, risk-free for 30 days, with a 100% guarantee of complete satisfaction.  For more information, please go to www.nationalunderwriter.com/TaxFactsIndividuals or call 1-800-543-0874.

 

Posted in Taxation | Tagged: , , | Leave a Comment »

Almost half of tax returns still due in remaining 25 days to file!

Posted by William Byrnes on March 21, 2014


The IRS announced in Newswire 2014-32 that almost half of the tax returns expected to be filed for the year 2013 had yet to be filed by March 14, 2014. How many returns will be filed in this last 25 day period?  About 70 million tax returns of the total expected 149 million returns of 2013! If half of these outstanding tax returns are filed with the assistance of a tax preparer, that’s 35 million potential clients in the past 25 days of the tax season! Not a bad profession to be in!

Over the next 25 days this blog will contain many articles for small business owners on taking certain deductions and obtaining various tax credits that allow a small business owner or entrepreneur to minimize the tax imposed on the trade or business and thus maximize the business’ after-tax return.

The IRS reminds small business owners and entrepreneurs of three tax facts that may impact the outstanding 2013 return.

Tax Fact 1: Optional safe harbor method to determine the business use of a home deduction.  Also known as the simplified option for claiming the home office deduction, beginning in 2013, taxpayers can use the optional safe harbor method to determine the deduction for the business use of a home.

If a taxpayer works from home, then it may be possible for the taxpayer to claim the home office deduction.  However, in years past this home office deduction has been rather complicated to calculate.

1. Generally, in order to claim a deduction for a home office, a taxpayer must use a part of your home exclusively and regularly for business purposes. Also, the part of your home used for business must be:

  • the principal place of business, or
  • a place where the taxpayer meets clients or customers in the normal course of business, or
  • a separate structure not attached to the home. Examples might include a studio, garage or barn.

What clearly does NOT qualify for a home office deduction?  By example, a taxpayer sets up a computer in her bedroom on a dresser that she uses for personal emails and for keeping her business records.  In the dresser drawers are pens, paperclips, some receipts, as well as hair clips and some pieces of jewelry.  The IRS isn’t going to allow a home office deduction based on that computer on that dresser.

The taxpayer may be able to use the simplified option to claim the home office deduction instead of claiming actual expenses. Under this method, the taxpayer multiplies the allowable square footage of the office area by a prescribed rate of $5.  The maximum footage allowed by the IRS is 300 square feet. The deduction maximum limit using this method is thus $1,500 per year.

If the taxpayer is self-employed and chooses the actual expense method, then the taxpayer should use Form 8829Expenses for Business Use of Your Home, to calculate the amount of the home office deduction.  The taxpayer claims the deduction on Schedule CProfit or Loss From Business, whether using the simplified or actual expense method.

If the taxpayer is an employee, then additional rules apply to claim the deduction. For example, in addition to the above tests, the business use must also be for the employer’s convenience.  By example: a “work from home” arrangement.

Tax Fact 2: Standard mileage rate. Beginning in 2013, the standard mileage rate for the cost of operating a car, van, pickup, or panel truck for each mile of business use is 56.5 cents per mile.

Tax Fact 3: Additional Medicare Tax. Beginning in 2013, a 0.9% Additional Medicare Tax applies to Medicare wages, railroad retirement (RRTA) compensation, and self-employment income that are more than:

  • $125,000 if married filing separately,
  • $250,000 if married filing jointly, or
  • $200,000 if single, head of household, or qualifying widow(er) with dependent child.

Medicare wages and self-employment income are combined to determine if a taxpayer’s income exceeds the threshold. RRTA compensation should be separately compared to the threshold.

tax-facts-online_medium

Due to a number of recent changes in the law, taxpayers are currently facing many questions connected to important issues such as healthcare, home office use, capital gains, investments, and whether an individual is considered an employee or a contractor. Financial advisors are continually looking for updated tax information that can help them provide the right answers to the right people at the right time. This brand-new resource provides fast, clear, and authoritative answers to pressing questions, and it does so in the convenient, timesaving, Q&A format for which Tax Facts is famous.

“Our brand-new Tax Facts title is exciting in many ways,” says Rick Kravitz, Vice President & Managing Director of Summit Professional Network’s Professional Publishing Division. “First of all, it fills a huge gap in the resources available to today’s advisors. Small business is a big market, and this book enables advisors to get up-and-running right away, with proven guidance that will help them serve their clients’ needs. Secondly, it addresses the biggest questions facing all taxpayers and provides absolutely reliable answers that help advisors solve today’s biggest problems with confidence.”

Robert Bloink, Esq., LL.M., and William H. Byrnes, Esq., LL.M., CWM®—are delivering real-life guidance based on decades of experience.  The authors’ knowledge and experience in tax law and practice provides the expert guidance for National Underwriter to once again deliver a valuable resource for the financial advising community,” added Rick Kravitz.

Anyone interested can try Tax Facts on Individuals & Small Business, risk-free for 30 days, with a 100% guarantee of complete satisfaction.  For more information, please go to www.nationalunderwriter.com/TaxFactsIndividuals or call 1-800-543-0874.

Posted in Taxation | Tagged: , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

 
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